2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2336/46767
Title:
Early life environment and snoring in adulthood.
Authors:
Franklin, Karl A; Janson, Christer; Gislason, Thorarinn; Gulsvik, Amund; Gunnbjörnsdottir, Maria; Laerum, Birger N; Lindberg, Eva; Norrman, Eva; Nyström, Lennarth; Omenaas, Ernst; Torén, Kjell; Svanes, Cecilie
Citation:
Respir. Res. 2008, 9:63
Issue Date:
1-Aug-2008
Abstract:
BACKGROUND: To our knowledge, no studies of the possible association of early life environment with snoring in adulthood have been published. We aimed to investigate whether early life environment is associated with snoring later in life. METHODS: A questionnaire including snoring frequency in adulthood and environmental factors in early life was obtained from 16,190 randomly selected men and women, aged 25-54 years, in Sweden, Norway, Iceland, Denmark and Estonia (response rate 74%). RESULTS: A total of 15,556 subjects answered the questions on snoring. Habitual snoring, defined as loud and disturbing snoring at least 3 nights a week, was reported by 18%. Being hospitalized for a respiratory infection before the age of two years (adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 1.27; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.01-1.59), suffering from recurrent otitis as a child (OR = 1.18; 95%CI 1.05-1.33), growing up in a large family (OR = 1.04; 95%CI 1.002-1.07) and being exposed to a dog at home as a newborn (OR = 1.26; 95%CI 1.12-1.42) were independently related to snoring later in life and independent of a number of possible confounders in adulthood. The same childhood environmental factors except household size were also related with snoring and daytime sleepiness combined. CONCLUSION: The predisposition for adult snoring may be partly established early in life. Having had severe airway infections or recurrent otitis in childhood, being exposed to a dog as a newborn and growing up in a large family are environmental factors associated with snoring in adulthood.
Description:
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Additional Links:
http://respiratory-research.com/content/9/1/63

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorFranklin, Karl A-
dc.contributor.authorJanson, Christer-
dc.contributor.authorGislason, Thorarinn-
dc.contributor.authorGulsvik, Amund-
dc.contributor.authorGunnbjörnsdottir, Maria-
dc.contributor.authorLaerum, Birger N-
dc.contributor.authorLindberg, Eva-
dc.contributor.authorNorrman, Eva-
dc.contributor.authorNyström, Lennarth-
dc.contributor.authorOmenaas, Ernst-
dc.contributor.authorTorén, Kjell-
dc.contributor.authorSvanes, Cecilie-
dc.date.accessioned2008-12-19T15:33:29Z-
dc.date.available2008-12-19T15:33:29Z-
dc.date.issued2008-08-01-
dc.date.submitted2008-12-19-
dc.identifier.citationRespir. Res. 2008, 9:63en
dc.identifier.pmid18721453-
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1465-9921-9-63-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/46767-
dc.descriptionTo access full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink "View/Open" at the bottom of this pageen
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: To our knowledge, no studies of the possible association of early life environment with snoring in adulthood have been published. We aimed to investigate whether early life environment is associated with snoring later in life. METHODS: A questionnaire including snoring frequency in adulthood and environmental factors in early life was obtained from 16,190 randomly selected men and women, aged 25-54 years, in Sweden, Norway, Iceland, Denmark and Estonia (response rate 74%). RESULTS: A total of 15,556 subjects answered the questions on snoring. Habitual snoring, defined as loud and disturbing snoring at least 3 nights a week, was reported by 18%. Being hospitalized for a respiratory infection before the age of two years (adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 1.27; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.01-1.59), suffering from recurrent otitis as a child (OR = 1.18; 95%CI 1.05-1.33), growing up in a large family (OR = 1.04; 95%CI 1.002-1.07) and being exposed to a dog at home as a newborn (OR = 1.26; 95%CI 1.12-1.42) were independently related to snoring later in life and independent of a number of possible confounders in adulthood. The same childhood environmental factors except household size were also related with snoring and daytime sleepiness combined. CONCLUSION: The predisposition for adult snoring may be partly established early in life. Having had severe airway infections or recurrent otitis in childhood, being exposed to a dog as a newborn and growing up in a large family are environmental factors associated with snoring in adulthood.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBioMed Central Ltd.en
dc.relation.urlhttp://respiratory-research.com/content/9/1/63en
dc.subject.meshAdulten
dc.subject.meshAge Factorsen
dc.subject.meshCausalityen
dc.subject.meshComorbidityen
dc.subject.meshEnvironmental Exposureen
dc.subject.meshEstoniaen
dc.subject.meshFamily Characteristicsen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshHealth Surveysen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshMaleen
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden
dc.subject.meshOtitis Mediaen
dc.subject.meshQuestionnairesen
dc.subject.meshRespiratory Tract Infectionsen
dc.subject.meshScandinaviaen
dc.subject.meshSnoringen
dc.titleEarly life environment and snoring in adulthood.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn1465-993X-
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Respiratory Medicine and Allergology, University Hospital, Umeå, Sweden. karl.franklin@lung.umu.seen
dc.identifier.journalRespiratory researchen

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