Low back pain, smoking and employment during pregnancy and after delivery - a 3-month follow-up study

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2336/47293
Title:
Low back pain, smoking and employment during pregnancy and after delivery - a 3-month follow-up study
Authors:
Lindal, E; Hauksson, A; Arnardottir, S; Hallgrimsson, J P
Citation:
J Obstet Gynaecol. 2000, 20(3):263-6
Issue Date:
1-May-2000
Abstract:
Low back pain (LBP.), smoking and employment was studied among 111 consecutive women admitted to a maternity ward over a 6-week period, 40 were primiparas and 71 multiparas. LBP was defined as any pain in the low back, irrespective of the specific cause of the pain. Two specially constructed questionnaires were utilised. The first was a, 14-item questionnaire which all participants answered before leaving the maternity ward. It included questions on employment and smoking and self-rating Visual Analogue Scales used for rating LBP. LBP was rated during the pregnancy and 3 days after delivery. The second questionnaire was used in a 90-day follow-up interview. The mean age of participants was 28 years. The prevalence of LBP during pregnancy was 58.5% among the 111 participants. Of the 111, 75% continued to have LBP postpartum and at the 90-day post-delivery follow-up, 54% of those with LBP during pregnancy were still experiencing LBP. Previous births and birth weight were not found to correlate positively with LBP. LBP during pregnancy did not affect the length of employment during pregnancy. Smokers had LBP more frequently during pregnancy and also after (P <0.002). It is concluded that smoking does seem to contribute to LBP during and after pregnancy. Birth weight does not affect LBP and LBP does not affect the length of employment during pregnancy.
Description:
To access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links field
Additional Links:
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&AN=3228962&site=ehost-live

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorLindal, E-
dc.contributor.authorHauksson, A-
dc.contributor.authorArnardottir, S-
dc.contributor.authorHallgrimsson, J P-
dc.date.accessioned2009-01-12T09:41:29Z-
dc.date.available2009-01-12T09:41:29Z-
dc.date.issued2000-05-01-
dc.date.submitted2009-01-12-
dc.identifier.citationJ Obstet Gynaecol. 2000, 20(3):263-6en
dc.identifier.issn0144-3615-
dc.identifier.pmid15512548-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/01443610050009575-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/47293-
dc.descriptionTo access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links fielden
dc.description.abstractLow back pain (LBP.), smoking and employment was studied among 111 consecutive women admitted to a maternity ward over a 6-week period, 40 were primiparas and 71 multiparas. LBP was defined as any pain in the low back, irrespective of the specific cause of the pain. Two specially constructed questionnaires were utilised. The first was a, 14-item questionnaire which all participants answered before leaving the maternity ward. It included questions on employment and smoking and self-rating Visual Analogue Scales used for rating LBP. LBP was rated during the pregnancy and 3 days after delivery. The second questionnaire was used in a 90-day follow-up interview. The mean age of participants was 28 years. The prevalence of LBP during pregnancy was 58.5% among the 111 participants. Of the 111, 75% continued to have LBP postpartum and at the 90-day post-delivery follow-up, 54% of those with LBP during pregnancy were still experiencing LBP. Previous births and birth weight were not found to correlate positively with LBP. LBP during pregnancy did not affect the length of employment during pregnancy. Smokers had LBP more frequently during pregnancy and also after (P <0.002). It is concluded that smoking does seem to contribute to LBP during and after pregnancy. Birth weight does not affect LBP and LBP does not affect the length of employment during pregnancy.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor & Francis Health Sciencesen
dc.relation.urlhttp://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&AN=3228962&site=ehost-liveen
dc.subject.meshLow Back Painen
dc.subject.meshPregnancyen
dc.titleLow back pain, smoking and employment during pregnancy and after delivery - a 3-month follow-up studyen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn1364-6893-
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Psychiatry, National Univeristy Hospital and Maternity Division, Primary Health Care Centre, Reykjavik, Iceland. elindal@rsp.isen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of obstetrics and gynaecology : the journal of the Institute of Obstetrics and Gynaecologyen
All Items in Hirsla are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.