Intranasal immunization with pneumococcal polysaccharide conjugate vaccines protects mice against invasive pneumococcal infections.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2336/47305
Title:
Intranasal immunization with pneumococcal polysaccharide conjugate vaccines protects mice against invasive pneumococcal infections.
Authors:
Jakobsen, H; Saeland, E; Gizurarson, S; Schulz, D; Jonsdottir, I
Citation:
Infect. Immun. 1999, 67(8):4128-33
Issue Date:
1-Aug-1999
Abstract:
Host defenses against Streptococcus pneumoniae depend largely on opsonophagocytosis mediated by antibodies and complement. Since pneumococcus is a respiratory pathogen, mucosal immune responses may play a significant role in the defense against pneumococcal infections. Thus, mucosal vaccination may be an alternative approach to current immunization strategies, but effective adjuvants are required. Protein antigens induce significant mucosal immunoglobulin A (IgA) and systemic IgG responses when administered intranasally (i. n.) with the glyceride-polysorbate based adjuvant RhinoVax (RV) both in experimental animals and humans. The immunogenicity and efficacy of pneumococcal polysaccharide conjugate vaccines (PNC) of serotypes 1 and 3 was studied in mice after i.n. immunization with RV. Antibodies were measured in serum (IgM, IgG, and IgA) and saliva (IgA) and compared to antibody titers induced by parenteral immunization. The PNCs induced significant systemic IgG and IgA antibodies after i.n. immunization only when given with RV and, for serotype 1, serum IgG titers were comparable to titers induced by subcutaneous immunization. In addition, i.n. immunization with PNC-1 in RV elicited detectable mucosal IgA. These results demonstrate that RV is a potent mucosal adjuvant for polysaccharides conjugated to proteins. A majority of the PNC-1-immunized mice were protected against both bacteremia and pneumonia after i.n. challenge with a lethal dose of serotype 1 pneumococci, and protection correlated significantly with the serum IgG titers. Similarly, the survival of mice immunized i.n. with PNC-3 in RV was significantly prolonged. These results indicate that mucosal vaccination with PNC and adjuvants may be an alternative strategy for prevention against pneumococcal infections.
Description:
To access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links field
Additional Links:
http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?artid=96716

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorJakobsen, H-
dc.contributor.authorSaeland, E-
dc.contributor.authorGizurarson, S-
dc.contributor.authorSchulz, D-
dc.contributor.authorJonsdottir, I-
dc.date.accessioned2009-01-12T16:01:09Z-
dc.date.available2009-01-12T16:01:09Z-
dc.date.issued1999-08-01-
dc.date.submitted2009-01-12-
dc.identifier.citationInfect. Immun. 1999, 67(8):4128-33en
dc.identifier.issn0019-9567-
dc.identifier.pmid10417183-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/47305-
dc.descriptionTo access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links fielden
dc.description.abstractHost defenses against Streptococcus pneumoniae depend largely on opsonophagocytosis mediated by antibodies and complement. Since pneumococcus is a respiratory pathogen, mucosal immune responses may play a significant role in the defense against pneumococcal infections. Thus, mucosal vaccination may be an alternative approach to current immunization strategies, but effective adjuvants are required. Protein antigens induce significant mucosal immunoglobulin A (IgA) and systemic IgG responses when administered intranasally (i. n.) with the glyceride-polysorbate based adjuvant RhinoVax (RV) both in experimental animals and humans. The immunogenicity and efficacy of pneumococcal polysaccharide conjugate vaccines (PNC) of serotypes 1 and 3 was studied in mice after i.n. immunization with RV. Antibodies were measured in serum (IgM, IgG, and IgA) and saliva (IgA) and compared to antibody titers induced by parenteral immunization. The PNCs induced significant systemic IgG and IgA antibodies after i.n. immunization only when given with RV and, for serotype 1, serum IgG titers were comparable to titers induced by subcutaneous immunization. In addition, i.n. immunization with PNC-1 in RV elicited detectable mucosal IgA. These results demonstrate that RV is a potent mucosal adjuvant for polysaccharides conjugated to proteins. A majority of the PNC-1-immunized mice were protected against both bacteremia and pneumonia after i.n. challenge with a lethal dose of serotype 1 pneumococci, and protection correlated significantly with the serum IgG titers. Similarly, the survival of mice immunized i.n. with PNC-3 in RV was significantly prolonged. These results indicate that mucosal vaccination with PNC and adjuvants may be an alternative strategy for prevention against pneumococcal infections.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherAmerican Society For Microbiologyen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?artid=96716en
dc.subject.meshAdministration, Intranasalen
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen
dc.subject.meshAntibodies, Bacterialen
dc.subject.meshBacterial Vaccinesen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshImmunizationen
dc.subject.meshImmunoglobulin A, Secretoryen
dc.subject.meshMiceen
dc.subject.meshPneumococcal Infectionsen
dc.subject.meshPneumococcal Vaccinesen
dc.subject.meshSerotypingen
dc.subject.meshStreptococcus pneumoniaeen
dc.subject.meshVaccines, Conjugateen
dc.titleIntranasal immunization with pneumococcal polysaccharide conjugate vaccines protects mice against invasive pneumococcal infections.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Immunology, National University Hospital, 101 Reykjavík, Iceland.en
dc.identifier.journalInfection and immunityen
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