Reflex interaction between the proximal urethra and the bladder. A clinical experimental study

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2336/47464
Title:
Reflex interaction between the proximal urethra and the bladder. A clinical experimental study
Authors:
Geirsson, G; Fall, M
Citation:
Scand. J. Urol. Nephrol. 1999, 33(1):24-6
Issue Date:
1-Feb-1999
Abstract:
OBJECTIVE: Animal experiments have shown that the bladder-cooling reflex is activated by cold stimulation of the bladder and urethra, causing a reflex bladder contraction. In this clinical experimental study, the bladder reflex responses to distension and cooling of the bladder neck and the proximal urethra were investigated. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Twenty-one patients with overactive bladders and documented positive ice water tests were studied. RESULTS: Three patients (14%) responded with reflex bladder contraction by urethral infusion of ice water only, and another 4 patients responded to urethral distension with both warm and cold water. In 4 patients, bladder contraction was induced by a catheter pulling on the bladder neck. CONCLUSION: This study supports the existence of a cold-sensitive reflex system in the human urethra. However, in the experimental situation, both cold and tension-mediated reflexes were more difficult to evoke from the urethra than from the bladder.
Description:
To access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links field
Additional Links:
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&AN=4041587&site=ehost-live

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorGeirsson, G-
dc.contributor.authorFall, M-
dc.date.accessioned2009-01-15T11:15:54Z-
dc.date.available2009-01-15T11:15:54Z-
dc.date.issued1999-02-01-
dc.date.submitted2008-01-15-
dc.identifier.citationScand. J. Urol. Nephrol. 1999, 33(1):24-6en
dc.identifier.issn0036-5599-
dc.identifier.pmid10100359-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/003655999750016221-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/47464-
dc.descriptionTo access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links fielden
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: Animal experiments have shown that the bladder-cooling reflex is activated by cold stimulation of the bladder and urethra, causing a reflex bladder contraction. In this clinical experimental study, the bladder reflex responses to distension and cooling of the bladder neck and the proximal urethra were investigated. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Twenty-one patients with overactive bladders and documented positive ice water tests were studied. RESULTS: Three patients (14%) responded with reflex bladder contraction by urethral infusion of ice water only, and another 4 patients responded to urethral distension with both warm and cold water. In 4 patients, bladder contraction was induced by a catheter pulling on the bladder neck. CONCLUSION: This study supports the existence of a cold-sensitive reflex system in the human urethra. However, in the experimental situation, both cold and tension-mediated reflexes were more difficult to evoke from the urethra than from the bladder.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor & Francisen
dc.relation.urlhttp://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&AN=4041587&site=ehost-liveen
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten
dc.subject.meshAdulten
dc.subject.meshAgeden
dc.subject.meshCold Temperatureen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshMaleen
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden
dc.subject.meshProspective Studiesen
dc.subject.meshReflexen
dc.subject.meshUrethraen
dc.subject.meshUrinary Bladderen
dc.subject.meshUrinary Catheterizationen
dc.subject.meshUrination Disordersen
dc.subject.meshUrodynamicsen
dc.titleReflex interaction between the proximal urethra and the bladder. A clinical experimental studyen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Urology, Reykjavik Hospital, Iceland.en
dc.identifier.journalScandinavian journal of urology and nephrologyen

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