Nicotine nasal spray with nicotine patch for smoking cessation: randomised trial with six year follow up

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2336/47517
Title:
Nicotine nasal spray with nicotine patch for smoking cessation: randomised trial with six year follow up
Authors:
Blondal, T; Gudmundsson, L J; Olafsdottir, I; Gustavsson, G; Westin, A
Citation:
BMJ. 1999, 318(7179):285-8
Issue Date:
30-Jan-1999
Abstract:
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the efficacy of using a nicotine patch for 5 months with a nicotine nasal spray for 1 year. DESIGN: Placebo controlled, double blind trial. SETTING: Reykjavik health centre. SUBJECTS: 237 smokers aged 22-66 years living in or around Reykjavik. INTERVENTIONS: Nicotine patch for 5 months with nicotine nasal spray for 1 year (n=118) or nicotine patch with placebo spray (n=119). Treatment with patches included 15 mg of nicotine for 3 months, 10 mg for the fourth month, and 5 mg for the fifth month, whereas nicotine in the nasal spray was available for up to 1 year. Both groups received supportive treatment. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Sustained abstinence from smoking. RESULTS: Sustained abstinence rates for the patch and nasal spray group and patch only group were 51% v 35% after 6 weeks (odds ratio 1.97, 95% confidence interval 1.17% to 3.32; P=0.011(chi2), 37% v 25% after 3 months (1.76, 1.01 to 3.08; P=0.045), 31% v 16% after 6 months (2.40, 1.27 to 4.50; P=0.005), 27% v 11% after 12 months (3.03, 1.50 to 6.14; P=0.001), and 16% v 9% after 6 years (2.09, 0.93 to 4.72; P=0.08) [corrected]. CONCLUSIONS: Short and long term abstinence rates show that the combination of using a nicotine patch for 5 months with a nicotine nasal spray for 1 year is a more effective method of stopping smoking than using a patch only. The low percentage of participants using the nasal spray at 1 year, and the few relapses during the second year, suggest that it is not cost effective to use a nasal spray for longer than 7 months after stopping a patch.
Description:
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Additional Links:
http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?artid=27708

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBlondal, T-
dc.contributor.authorGudmundsson, L J-
dc.contributor.authorOlafsdottir, I-
dc.contributor.authorGustavsson, G-
dc.contributor.authorWestin, A-
dc.date.accessioned2009-01-15T12:52:36Z-
dc.date.available2009-01-15T12:52:36Z-
dc.date.issued1999-01-30-
dc.date.submitted2009-01-15-
dc.identifier.citationBMJ. 1999, 318(7179):285-8en
dc.identifier.issn0959-8138-
dc.identifier.pmid9924052-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/47517-
dc.descriptionTo access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links fielden
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: To evaluate the efficacy of using a nicotine patch for 5 months with a nicotine nasal spray for 1 year. DESIGN: Placebo controlled, double blind trial. SETTING: Reykjavik health centre. SUBJECTS: 237 smokers aged 22-66 years living in or around Reykjavik. INTERVENTIONS: Nicotine patch for 5 months with nicotine nasal spray for 1 year (n=118) or nicotine patch with placebo spray (n=119). Treatment with patches included 15 mg of nicotine for 3 months, 10 mg for the fourth month, and 5 mg for the fifth month, whereas nicotine in the nasal spray was available for up to 1 year. Both groups received supportive treatment. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Sustained abstinence from smoking. RESULTS: Sustained abstinence rates for the patch and nasal spray group and patch only group were 51% v 35% after 6 weeks (odds ratio 1.97, 95% confidence interval 1.17% to 3.32; P=0.011(chi2), 37% v 25% after 3 months (1.76, 1.01 to 3.08; P=0.045), 31% v 16% after 6 months (2.40, 1.27 to 4.50; P=0.005), 27% v 11% after 12 months (3.03, 1.50 to 6.14; P=0.001), and 16% v 9% after 6 years (2.09, 0.93 to 4.72; P=0.08) [corrected]. CONCLUSIONS: Short and long term abstinence rates show that the combination of using a nicotine patch for 5 months with a nicotine nasal spray for 1 year is a more effective method of stopping smoking than using a patch only. The low percentage of participants using the nasal spray at 1 year, and the few relapses during the second year, suggest that it is not cost effective to use a nasal spray for longer than 7 months after stopping a patch.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?artid=27708en
dc.subject.meshAdministration, Cutaneousen
dc.subject.meshAdministration, Intranasalen
dc.subject.meshAdulten
dc.subject.meshAgeden
dc.subject.meshDouble-Blind Methoden
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshFollow-Up Studiesen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshMaleen
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden
dc.subject.meshNicotineen
dc.subject.meshNicotinic Agonistsen
dc.subject.meshSmoking Cessationen
dc.subject.meshTreatment Outcomeen
dc.titleNicotine nasal spray with nicotine patch for smoking cessation: randomised trial with six year follow upen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentReykjavik Health Care Centre, Baronstigur 47, 101 Reykjavik and National University Hospital, Iceland. blondal@hr.isen
dc.identifier.journalBMJ (Clinical research ed.)en

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