The relationship of needs and quality of life in persons with schizophrenia living in the community. A Nordic multi-center study

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2336/4778
Title:
The relationship of needs and quality of life in persons with schizophrenia living in the community. A Nordic multi-center study
Authors:
Hansson, Lars; Sandlund, Mikael; Bengtsson-Tops, Anita; Bjarnason, Olafur; Karlsson, Hasse; Mackeprang, Torben; Merinder, Lars; Nilsson, Liselotte; Sørgaard, Knut; Vinding, Hanne; Middelboe, Thomas
Citation:
Nord J Psychiatry 2003, 57(1):5-11
Issue Date:
2003
Abstract:
The relationship between needs for care and support and subjective quality of life was investigated in a cross-sectional multi-center study including 418 individuals with schizophrenia from 10 centers in Nordic countries. Needs in 22 domains were investigated by interviews with key workers and their patients using the Camberwell Assessment of Need scale, and quality of life by the Lancashire Quality of Life Profile. The results showed that key workers rated slightly more needs than patients. To have more unmet needs, as rated by both key workers and patients, were correlated to a worse overall subjective quality of life, while met needs showed no such association. A regression analysis, controlling for clinical and social characteristics of the patients, showed more unmet needs to be associated with a worse quality of life, accounting for 6% out of a total of 41% explained variance in subjective quality of life. Regression analyses of the relationship of unmet needs in specific life domains and overall quality of life showed that unmet needs in five domains as perceived by patients accounted for 17% of the explained variance in overall quality of life. More than half of this variance was related to an unmet need in the domain of social relationships. It is concluded that unmet needs are of specific importance in needs assessment and that attention must be paid to separate met needs for care and services from unmet needs, since the latter seem more important to consider in order to improve outcome of interventions with regard to quality of life. Specific attention should in this context also be paid to unmet needs concerning social relationships and problems with accommodation.
Description:
To access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links field
Additional Links:
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&AN=10261511&site=ehost-live

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHansson, Lars-
dc.contributor.authorSandlund, Mikael-
dc.contributor.authorBengtsson-Tops, Anita-
dc.contributor.authorBjarnason, Olafur-
dc.contributor.authorKarlsson, Hasse-
dc.contributor.authorMackeprang, Torben-
dc.contributor.authorMerinder, Lars-
dc.contributor.authorNilsson, Liselotte-
dc.contributor.authorSørgaard, Knut-
dc.contributor.authorVinding, Hanne-
dc.contributor.authorMiddelboe, Thomas-
dc.date.accessioned2006-10-02T15:46:48Z-
dc.date.available2006-10-02T15:46:48Z-
dc.date.issued2003-
dc.identifier.citationNord J Psychiatry 2003, 57(1):5-11en
dc.identifier.issn0803-9488-
dc.identifier.pmid12745786-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/08039480310000194-
dc.identifier.otherPSY12-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/4778-
dc.descriptionTo access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links fielden
dc.description.abstractThe relationship between needs for care and support and subjective quality of life was investigated in a cross-sectional multi-center study including 418 individuals with schizophrenia from 10 centers in Nordic countries. Needs in 22 domains were investigated by interviews with key workers and their patients using the Camberwell Assessment of Need scale, and quality of life by the Lancashire Quality of Life Profile. The results showed that key workers rated slightly more needs than patients. To have more unmet needs, as rated by both key workers and patients, were correlated to a worse overall subjective quality of life, while met needs showed no such association. A regression analysis, controlling for clinical and social characteristics of the patients, showed more unmet needs to be associated with a worse quality of life, accounting for 6% out of a total of 41% explained variance in subjective quality of life. Regression analyses of the relationship of unmet needs in specific life domains and overall quality of life showed that unmet needs in five domains as perceived by patients accounted for 17% of the explained variance in overall quality of life. More than half of this variance was related to an unmet need in the domain of social relationships. It is concluded that unmet needs are of specific importance in needs assessment and that attention must be paid to separate met needs for care and services from unmet needs, since the latter seem more important to consider in order to improve outcome of interventions with regard to quality of life. Specific attention should in this context also be paid to unmet needs concerning social relationships and problems with accommodation.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor & Francis Health Sciencesen
dc.relation.urlhttp://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&AN=10261511&site=ehost-liveen
dc.subject.meshAdulten
dc.subject.meshAmbulatory Careen
dc.subject.meshCommunity Mental Health Servicesen
dc.subject.meshCross-Sectional Studiesen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshMaleen
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden
dc.subject.meshNeeds Assessmenten
dc.subject.meshSchizophreniaen
dc.subject.meshScandinaviaen
dc.titleThe relationship of needs and quality of life in persons with schizophrenia living in the community. A Nordic multi-center studyen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalNordic journal of psychiatryen
dc.format.digYES-

Related articles on PubMed

All Items in Hirsla are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.