Different weight gain in women of normal weight before pregnancy: postpartum weight and birth weight.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2336/47999
Title:
Different weight gain in women of normal weight before pregnancy: postpartum weight and birth weight.
Authors:
Thorsdottir, I; Birgisdottir, B E
Citation:
Obstet Gynecol. 1998, 92(3):377-83
Issue Date:
1-Sep-1998
Abstract:
OBJECTIVE: To identify the effect of different gestational weight gains among women of normal weight before pregnancy on babies' birth weights, and women's weights 18-24 months postpartum. METHODS: Two groups of women of normal weight before pregnancy (body mass index [BMI] 19.6-25.4 kg/m2) took part in the study (n = 200). They gained either moderate weight (9-15 kg) or high weight (18-24 kg) during pregnancy. From maternity records and telephone interviews, information on age, height, prepregnancy and postpartum weight, gestational weight gain, babies' birth weights, lactation, parity, and smoking habits was collected. RESULTS: High maternal weight gain during pregnancy resulted in mean birth weight 286 g higher than that of babies of mothers who gained moderate weight. The correlation coefficient between birth weight and gestational weight gain was 0.3 (P < .001). The postpartum weight of women with high weight gain during pregnancy was 2.6+/-0.38 kg (mean +/- standard error of the mean [SEM]) more than before pregnancy but the group of moderate weight gain weighed 0.1+/-0.47 kg less than before pregnancy (P < .001). However, most women in both groups (88.6%) regained normal weight, and prepregnant weight correlated strongly with the weight 18-24 months postpartum (r = 0.79, P < .001). There was not a significant correlation between the duration of lactation and postpartum weight loss (r = 0.04, P > .05). CONCLUSION: High gestational weight gain among women of normal weight before pregnancy increases birth weight and women's weight postpartum, compared with moderate weight gain. Prepregnant weight is more indicative of postpartum weight, and women reach normal weight again irrespective of gestational weight gain.
Description:
To access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links field
Additional Links:
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/B6TB2-3V3HSKP-D/2/c2eda0344060ef5a5d5249c544e33555

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorThorsdottir, I-
dc.contributor.authorBirgisdottir, B E-
dc.date.accessioned2009-01-26T11:36:06Z-
dc.date.available2009-01-26T11:36:06Z-
dc.date.issued1998-09-01-
dc.date.submitted2009-01-26-
dc.identifier.citationObstet Gynecol. 1998, 92(3):377-83en
dc.identifier.issn0029-7844-
dc.identifier.pmid9721774-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/47999-
dc.descriptionTo access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links fielden
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: To identify the effect of different gestational weight gains among women of normal weight before pregnancy on babies' birth weights, and women's weights 18-24 months postpartum. METHODS: Two groups of women of normal weight before pregnancy (body mass index [BMI] 19.6-25.4 kg/m2) took part in the study (n = 200). They gained either moderate weight (9-15 kg) or high weight (18-24 kg) during pregnancy. From maternity records and telephone interviews, information on age, height, prepregnancy and postpartum weight, gestational weight gain, babies' birth weights, lactation, parity, and smoking habits was collected. RESULTS: High maternal weight gain during pregnancy resulted in mean birth weight 286 g higher than that of babies of mothers who gained moderate weight. The correlation coefficient between birth weight and gestational weight gain was 0.3 (P < .001). The postpartum weight of women with high weight gain during pregnancy was 2.6+/-0.38 kg (mean +/- standard error of the mean [SEM]) more than before pregnancy but the group of moderate weight gain weighed 0.1+/-0.47 kg less than before pregnancy (P < .001). However, most women in both groups (88.6%) regained normal weight, and prepregnant weight correlated strongly with the weight 18-24 months postpartum (r = 0.79, P < .001). There was not a significant correlation between the duration of lactation and postpartum weight loss (r = 0.04, P > .05). CONCLUSION: High gestational weight gain among women of normal weight before pregnancy increases birth weight and women's weight postpartum, compared with moderate weight gain. Prepregnant weight is more indicative of postpartum weight, and women reach normal weight again irrespective of gestational weight gain.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLippincott Williams & Wilkinsen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/B6TB2-3V3HSKP-D/2/c2eda0344060ef5a5d5249c544e33555en
dc.subject.meshAdulten
dc.subject.meshBirth Weighten
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshInfant, Newbornen
dc.subject.meshPostpartum Perioden
dc.subject.meshPregnancyen
dc.subject.meshWeight Gainen
dc.titleDifferent weight gain in women of normal weight before pregnancy: postpartum weight and birth weight.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentNational University Hospital, Department of Food Science, University of Iceland, Reykjavik. ingathor@rsp.isen
dc.identifier.journalObstetrics and gynecologyen

Related articles on PubMed

All Items in Hirsla are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.