2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2336/4824
Title:
Induced abortion in the Nordic countries: special emphasis on young women
Authors:
Knudsen, Lisbeth B; Gissler, Mika; Bender, Soley S; Hedberg, Clas; Ollendorff, Ulla; Sundström, Kajsa; Totlandsdal, Kristina; Vilhjalmsdottir, Sigridur
Citation:
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand 2003, 82(3):257-68
Issue Date:
1-Mar-2003
Abstract:
BACKGROUND: To analyze the trends in legally induced abortions among women younger than 30 years in the five Nordic countries, Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden, since the liberalized abortion laws came into force. METHODS: Data stem from national registrations of vital events. Some have been published in the national vital statistics while others have been retrieved for this study. General and age-specific abortion rates are used to analyze the trends. Further, an index has been calculated by dividing the age-specific abortion rates by the Nordic average. RESULTS: The analysis reveals an overall reduction in the general abortion rates in the Nordic countries, apart from Iceland. The rates have been highest in Denmark and Sweden and lowest in Finland since the early 1980s. In the mid-1980s, the abortion rates increased among 15-19-year-old women in Sweden and among 20-24-year-old women in Denmark, Norway and Sweden, followed by a reduction. In Iceland the very low age-specific abortion rates for all age groups under 30 years at the beginning of the study period increased and Iceland had the highest rate for 15-19-year-old women in the late-1990s. CONCLUSIONS: The relatively low abortion rates in Finland demonstrate effective preventive efforts, although the recent increase challenges further studies on the relationship between abortion rates and counseling activities. The rise in abortion rates in Iceland indicate a need for improved sex education, contraceptive services and availability of contraceptive methods for young people.
Additional Links:
http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi/full/10.1034/j.1600-0412.2003.00006.x

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorKnudsen, Lisbeth B-
dc.contributor.authorGissler, Mika-
dc.contributor.authorBender, Soley S-
dc.contributor.authorHedberg, Clas-
dc.contributor.authorOllendorff, Ulla-
dc.contributor.authorSundström, Kajsa-
dc.contributor.authorTotlandsdal, Kristina-
dc.contributor.authorVilhjalmsdottir, Sigridur-
dc.date.accessioned2006-10-04T09:32:51Z-
dc.date.available2006-10-04T09:32:51Z-
dc.date.issued2003-03-01-
dc.identifier.citationActa Obstet Gynecol Scand 2003, 82(3):257-68en
dc.identifier.issn0001-6349-
dc.identifier.pmid12694123-
dc.identifier.doi10.1034/j.1600-0412.2003.00006.x-
dc.identifier.otherSAR12-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/4824-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: To analyze the trends in legally induced abortions among women younger than 30 years in the five Nordic countries, Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden, since the liberalized abortion laws came into force. METHODS: Data stem from national registrations of vital events. Some have been published in the national vital statistics while others have been retrieved for this study. General and age-specific abortion rates are used to analyze the trends. Further, an index has been calculated by dividing the age-specific abortion rates by the Nordic average. RESULTS: The analysis reveals an overall reduction in the general abortion rates in the Nordic countries, apart from Iceland. The rates have been highest in Denmark and Sweden and lowest in Finland since the early 1980s. In the mid-1980s, the abortion rates increased among 15-19-year-old women in Sweden and among 20-24-year-old women in Denmark, Norway and Sweden, followed by a reduction. In Iceland the very low age-specific abortion rates for all age groups under 30 years at the beginning of the study period increased and Iceland had the highest rate for 15-19-year-old women in the late-1990s. CONCLUSIONS: The relatively low abortion rates in Finland demonstrate effective preventive efforts, although the recent increase challenges further studies on the relationship between abortion rates and counseling activities. The rise in abortion rates in Iceland indicate a need for improved sex education, contraceptive services and availability of contraceptive methods for young people.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBlackwell Munksgaarden
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi/full/10.1034/j.1600-0412.2003.00006.xen
dc.subject.meshAbortion, Induceden
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten
dc.subject.meshAdulten
dc.subject.meshAge Factorsen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshFinlanden
dc.subject.meshIcelanden
dc.subject.meshLegislationen
dc.subject.meshPregnancyen
dc.subject.meshResearch Support, Non-U.S. Gov'ten
dc.subject.meshScandinaviaen
dc.titleInduced abortion in the Nordic countries: special emphasis on young womenen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalActa obstetricia et gynecologica Scandinavicaen
dc.format.digYES-
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