2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2336/49078
Title:
Fertility in patients with epilepsy: a population-based study
Authors:
Olafsson, E; Hauser, W A; Gudmundsson, G
Citation:
Neurology. 1998, 51(1):71-3
Issue Date:
1-Jul-1998
Abstract:
OBJECTIVE: Several studies have suggested that people with epilepsy have altered fertility, but comparison groups have been imperfect. METHOD: A retrospective cohort study of all live births to 209 incident patients with epilepsy in Iceland from 1960 to 1964 and live births to 418 age- (to the closest day of birth) and gender-matched residents without epilepsy. RESULTS: Incident patients with epilepsy had an average of 2.0 children; the controls also had an average of 2.0 children. When people with idiopathic/cryptogenic epilepsy were compared with controls, there was no difference in number of children or number of partners overall, nor were there differences when stratified by seizure type or age at diagnosis. There was a deficit in the number of children among patients with remote symptomatic epilepsy. This was attributed to a reduced number of offspring of patients with mental retardation (MR) or cerebral palsy (CP) when compared with their controls. CONCLUSION: There is no evidence of altered fertility among people with idiopathic/cryptogenic epilepsy or remote symptomatic epilepsy (other than MR or CP) within this population-based incidence cohort.
Description:
Neðst á síðunni er hægt að nálgast greinina í heild sinni með því að smella á hlekkinn View/Open
Additional Links:
http://ovidsp.ovid.com/ovidweb.cgi?T=JS&NEWS=N&PAGE=fulltext&AN=00006114-199807000-00020&LSLINK=80&D=ovft

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorOlafsson, E-
dc.contributor.authorHauser, W A-
dc.contributor.authorGudmundsson, G-
dc.date.accessioned2009-02-13T15:39:04Z-
dc.date.available2009-02-13T15:39:04Z-
dc.date.issued1998-07-01-
dc.date.submitted2009-02-13-
dc.identifier.citationNeurology. 1998, 51(1):71-3en
dc.identifier.issn0028-3878-
dc.identifier.pmid9674781-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/49078-
dc.descriptionNeðst á síðunni er hægt að nálgast greinina í heild sinni með því að smella á hlekkinn View/Openen
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: Several studies have suggested that people with epilepsy have altered fertility, but comparison groups have been imperfect. METHOD: A retrospective cohort study of all live births to 209 incident patients with epilepsy in Iceland from 1960 to 1964 and live births to 418 age- (to the closest day of birth) and gender-matched residents without epilepsy. RESULTS: Incident patients with epilepsy had an average of 2.0 children; the controls also had an average of 2.0 children. When people with idiopathic/cryptogenic epilepsy were compared with controls, there was no difference in number of children or number of partners overall, nor were there differences when stratified by seizure type or age at diagnosis. There was a deficit in the number of children among patients with remote symptomatic epilepsy. This was attributed to a reduced number of offspring of patients with mental retardation (MR) or cerebral palsy (CP) when compared with their controls. CONCLUSION: There is no evidence of altered fertility among people with idiopathic/cryptogenic epilepsy or remote symptomatic epilepsy (other than MR or CP) within this population-based incidence cohort.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLippincott Williams & Wilkinsen
dc.relation.urlhttp://ovidsp.ovid.com/ovidweb.cgi?T=JS&NEWS=N&PAGE=fulltext&AN=00006114-199807000-00020&LSLINK=80&D=ovften
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten
dc.subject.meshAdulten
dc.subject.meshCohort Studiesen
dc.subject.meshEpilepsies, Partialen
dc.subject.meshEpilepsy, Generalizeden
dc.subject.meshFamily Healthen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshFertilityen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshIcelanden
dc.subject.meshInfertilityen
dc.subject.meshMaleen
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden
dc.subject.meshRetrospective Studiesen
dc.subject.meshSexual Behavioren
dc.titleFertility in patients with epilepsy: a population-based studyen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Neurology, National University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland.en
dc.identifier.journalNeurologyen
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