Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels and bone mineral density in 16-20 years-old girls: lack of association.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2336/49080
Title:
Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels and bone mineral density in 16-20 years-old girls: lack of association.
Authors:
Kristinsson, J O; Valdimarsson, O; Sigurdsson, G; Franzson, L; Olafsson, I; Steingrimsdottir, L
Citation:
J. Intern. Med. 1998, 243(5):381-8
Issue Date:
1-May-1998
Abstract:
OBJECTIVE: Hypovitaminosis D has been shown to be associated with low bone mineral density in middle-aged and elderly women. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether such an association might exist in adolescent and young adult girls, approaching peak bone mass. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study carried out in late winter. SETTING: Reykjavik area at latitude 64 degrees N. SUBJECTS: Two-hundred and fifty-nine Icelandic Caucasian girls, aged 16, 18 and 20 years, randomly selected from the registry of Reykjavik. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Bone mineral density in lumbar spine, hip, distal forearm and total skeleton was measured with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) and compared with 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels [25 (OH)D] in serum, measured by radioimmunoassay. Calcium and vitamin-D intake were also assessed by a questionnaire. RESULTS: 18.5% of the girls were below 25 nmol L-1 in serum 25 (OH)D which has been recognized as the lower normal limit for adults. No significant association was found between 25 (OH)D levels and bone mineral density. CONCLUSIONS: Normal calcium and phosphate concentrations in plasma and normal bone mineral density are maintained in adolescent and young adult girls at lower 25 (OH)D levels than published 'normal' levels for middle-aged and elderly.
Description:
To access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links field
Additional Links:
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/10.1046/j.1365-2796.1998.00302.x

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorKristinsson, J O-
dc.contributor.authorValdimarsson, O-
dc.contributor.authorSigurdsson, G-
dc.contributor.authorFranzson, L-
dc.contributor.authorOlafsson, I-
dc.contributor.authorSteingrimsdottir, L-
dc.date.accessioned2009-02-13T16:03:29Z-
dc.date.available2009-02-13T16:03:29Z-
dc.date.issued1998-05-01-
dc.date.submitted2009-02-13-
dc.identifier.citationJ. Intern. Med. 1998, 243(5):381-8en
dc.identifier.issn0954-6820-
dc.identifier.pmid9651561-
dc.identifier.doi10.1046/j.1365-2796.1998.00302.x-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/49080-
dc.descriptionTo access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links fielden
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: Hypovitaminosis D has been shown to be associated with low bone mineral density in middle-aged and elderly women. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether such an association might exist in adolescent and young adult girls, approaching peak bone mass. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study carried out in late winter. SETTING: Reykjavik area at latitude 64 degrees N. SUBJECTS: Two-hundred and fifty-nine Icelandic Caucasian girls, aged 16, 18 and 20 years, randomly selected from the registry of Reykjavik. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Bone mineral density in lumbar spine, hip, distal forearm and total skeleton was measured with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) and compared with 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels [25 (OH)D] in serum, measured by radioimmunoassay. Calcium and vitamin-D intake were also assessed by a questionnaire. RESULTS: 18.5% of the girls were below 25 nmol L-1 in serum 25 (OH)D which has been recognized as the lower normal limit for adults. No significant association was found between 25 (OH)D levels and bone mineral density. CONCLUSIONS: Normal calcium and phosphate concentrations in plasma and normal bone mineral density are maintained in adolescent and young adult girls at lower 25 (OH)D levels than published 'normal' levels for middle-aged and elderly.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBlackwell Scientific Publicationsen
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1038/10.1046/j.1365-2796.1998.00302.xen
dc.subject.meshAbsorptiometry, Photonen
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten
dc.subject.meshAdulten
dc.subject.meshBone Densityen
dc.subject.meshCalciumen
dc.subject.meshCalcium, Dietaryen
dc.subject.meshCross-Sectional Studiesen
dc.subject.meshEnergy Intakeen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshGenotypeen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshLife Styleen
dc.subject.meshPhosphatesen
dc.subject.meshPolymorphism, Geneticen
dc.subject.meshRadioimmunoassayen
dc.subject.meshReceptors, Calcitriolen
dc.subject.meshVitamin Den
dc.titleSerum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels and bone mineral density in 16-20 years-old girls: lack of association.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Internal Medicine, Reykjavik Hospital, Iceland.en
dc.identifier.journalJournal of internal medicineen

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