An enzyme based assay for the measurement of complement mediated binding of immune complexes to red blood cells

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2336/49202
Title:
An enzyme based assay for the measurement of complement mediated binding of immune complexes to red blood cells
Authors:
Rafnar, B O; Traustadottir, K H; Sigfusson, A; Arason, G J; Valdimarsson, H; Erlendsson, K
Citation:
J. Immunol. Methods. 1998, 211(1-2):171-81
Issue Date:
1-Feb-1998
Abstract:
A new in vitro method is presented for measuring directly the ability of sera to induce binding of immune complexes (ICs) to erythrocytes (ICRB assay). The assay measures the binding of alkaline phosphatase (AP)-anti-alkaline phosphatase (anti-AP) complexes formed in the presence of the test sera to the complement receptor 1 (CR1) on normal human red blood cells (RBCs). By using a standard serum source, the assay can also be used to measure the IC binding ability of RBCs from different donors. As compared to the traditional CH50 method, the ICRB assay generally showed more pronounced abnormality in 10 individuals tested, of whom 5 had primary deficiency of classical pathway components. Seven out of ten individuals had systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and 2/10 had other rheumatic diseases without primary complement deficiency. The ICRB measured in samples from 9 other patients with SLE was significantly decreased when compared to values from 80 normal individuals. ICRB in serum samples from a C2 deficient SLE patient collected during plasma infusion treatment reflected closely the rising amount of C2 in the serum. Using RBCs from different donors ICRB activity correlated well with the numbers of CR1 as measured by a flow cytometric assay (FCA). These methods should be valuable for measuring the overall IC clearance capacity of the blood and have the advantage that the use of radioactive isotopes is avoided.
Description:
To access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links field
Additional Links:
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/B6T2Y-3V2N172-X/2/eb175bf07c488a08b86beb9043abbedc

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorRafnar, B O-
dc.contributor.authorTraustadottir, K H-
dc.contributor.authorSigfusson, A-
dc.contributor.authorArason, G J-
dc.contributor.authorValdimarsson, H-
dc.contributor.authorErlendsson, K-
dc.date.accessioned2009-02-16T12:42:30Z-
dc.date.available2009-02-16T12:42:30Z-
dc.date.issued1998-02-01-
dc.date.submitted2009-02-16-
dc.identifier.citationJ. Immunol. Methods. 1998, 211(1-2):171-81en
dc.identifier.issn0022-1759-
dc.identifier.pmid9617841-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/S0022-1759(97)00198-1-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/49202-
dc.descriptionTo access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links fielden
dc.description.abstractA new in vitro method is presented for measuring directly the ability of sera to induce binding of immune complexes (ICs) to erythrocytes (ICRB assay). The assay measures the binding of alkaline phosphatase (AP)-anti-alkaline phosphatase (anti-AP) complexes formed in the presence of the test sera to the complement receptor 1 (CR1) on normal human red blood cells (RBCs). By using a standard serum source, the assay can also be used to measure the IC binding ability of RBCs from different donors. As compared to the traditional CH50 method, the ICRB assay generally showed more pronounced abnormality in 10 individuals tested, of whom 5 had primary deficiency of classical pathway components. Seven out of ten individuals had systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and 2/10 had other rheumatic diseases without primary complement deficiency. The ICRB measured in samples from 9 other patients with SLE was significantly decreased when compared to values from 80 normal individuals. ICRB in serum samples from a C2 deficient SLE patient collected during plasma infusion treatment reflected closely the rising amount of C2 in the serum. Using RBCs from different donors ICRB activity correlated well with the numbers of CR1 as measured by a flow cytometric assay (FCA). These methods should be valuable for measuring the overall IC clearance capacity of the blood and have the advantage that the use of radioactive isotopes is avoided.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherNorth-Holland Pub. Co.en
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/B6T2Y-3V2N172-X/2/eb175bf07c488a08b86beb9043abbedcen
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen
dc.subject.meshAntigen-Antibody Complexen
dc.subject.meshComplement System Proteinsen
dc.subject.meshEnzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assayen
dc.subject.meshErythrocytesen
dc.subject.meshGuinea Pigsen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshKineticsen
dc.subject.meshLupus Erythematosus, Systemicen
dc.subject.meshReceptors, Complement 3ben
dc.subject.meshRh-Hr Blood-Group Systemen
dc.subject.meshRheumatic Diseasesen
dc.subject.meshRheumatoid Factoren
dc.titleAn enzyme based assay for the measurement of complement mediated binding of immune complexes to red blood cellsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Immunology, The National University Hospital, Reyjavík, Iceland.en
dc.identifier.journalJournal of immunological methodsen
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