2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2336/49275
Title:
Information policy disputes in Iceland
Authors:
Olafsson, Sveinn
Citation:
Int Inform & Libr Rev. 2002, 34(1):79-95
Issue Date:
1-Mar-2002
Abstract:
This article discusses disputes in Iceland in the last years. Information policy in Iceland has three main strands. The first is the policy laid out by the government in 1995 and 1996, mainly defining the public sector as a buyer of information services. This policy gave the new information industries wide berth to make them better suited to create new jobs. Within that broad policy, individual ministries had scope to form their own policies. The Ministry for Education, Culture and Science has used the opportunity to subscribe nationally to a host of databases. The second strand is the Health Sector Database which sprang from a business idea and has been controversial ever since. The third strand is personal data protection and privacy, where Iceland follows Europe closely. Since the main field of dispute has been the formation of the Health Sector Database, a great part of the article discusses legal, ethical and social questions concerning that database.
Description:
To access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links field
Additional Links:
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/B6WGP-460370W-5/2/97ed6d549d75fe30f648ee95e1870ed4

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorOlafsson, Sveinn-
dc.date.accessioned2009-02-17T11:15:11Z-
dc.date.available2009-02-17T11:15:11Z-
dc.date.issued2002-03-01-
dc.date.submitted2009-02-17-
dc.identifier.citationInt Inform & Libr Rev. 2002, 34(1):79-95en
dc.identifier.issn10572317-
dc.identifier.issn1095-9297-
dc.identifier.doi10.1006/iilr.2002.0185-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/49275-
dc.descriptionTo access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links fielden
dc.description.abstractThis article discusses disputes in Iceland in the last years. Information policy in Iceland has three main strands. The first is the policy laid out by the government in 1995 and 1996, mainly defining the public sector as a buyer of information services. This policy gave the new information industries wide berth to make them better suited to create new jobs. Within that broad policy, individual ministries had scope to form their own policies. The Ministry for Education, Culture and Science has used the opportunity to subscribe nationally to a host of databases. The second strand is the Health Sector Database which sprang from a business idea and has been controversial ever since. The third strand is personal data protection and privacy, where Iceland follows Europe closely. Since the main field of dispute has been the formation of the Health Sector Database, a great part of the article discusses legal, ethical and social questions concerning that database.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherAcademic Pressen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/B6WGP-460370W-5/2/97ed6d549d75fe30f648ee95e1870ed4en
dc.subject.meshIcelanden
dc.subject.meshDatabases, Geneticen
dc.subject.meshPublic Policyen
dc.subject.meshDatabases as Topicen
dc.subject.meshEthicsen
dc.titleInformation policy disputes in Icelanden
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentNational and University Library of Iceland, Arngrimsgata 3, 107 Reykjavik, Icelanden
dc.identifier.journalInternational information and library reviewen
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