Iodine intake and the pattern of thyroid disorders: a comparative epidemiological study of thyroid abnormalities in the elderly in Iceland and in Jutland, Denmark

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2336/49713
Title:
Iodine intake and the pattern of thyroid disorders: a comparative epidemiological study of thyroid abnormalities in the elderly in Iceland and in Jutland, Denmark
Authors:
Laurberg, P; Pedersen, K M; Hreidarsson, A; Sigfusson, N; Iversen, E; Knudsen, P R
Citation:
J. Clin. Endocrinol. Metab. 1998, 83(3):765-9
Issue Date:
1-Mar-1998
Abstract:
Thyroid abnormalities are common in all populations, but it is difficult to compare results of epidemiological studies, because different methods have been used for evaluation. We studied the importance of the population iodine intake level for the prevalence rate of various thyroid abnormalities in elderly subjects. Random samples of elderly subjects (68 yr) were selected from the central person registers in Jutland, Denmark, with low (n = 423) and, in Iceland, with longstanding relatively high (n = 100) iodine intake. Females from Jutland had a high prevalence of goiter or previous goiter surgery (12.2%), compared with males from Jutland (3.2%) and females (1.9%) and males (2.2%) from Iceland. Abnormal thyroid function was very common in both areas, with serum TSH outside the reference range in 13.5% of subjects from Jutland and 19% of those from Iceland. In Jutland, it was mainly thyroid hyperfunction (9.7% had low, 3.8% had high serum TSH), whereas in Iceland, it was impaired thyroid function (1% had low, 18% had high serum TSH). All subjects with serum TSH more than 10 mU/L had autoantibodies in serum, but antibodies were, in general, more common in Jutland than in Iceland. Thus, thyroid abnormalities in populations with low iodine intake and those with high iodine intake develop in opposite directions: goiter and thyroid hyperfunction when iodine intake is relatively low, and impaired thyroid function when iodine intake is relatively high. Probably, mild iodine deficiency partly protects against autoimmune thyroid disease. Thyroid autoantibodies may be markers of an autoimmune process in the thyroid or secondary to the development of goiter.
Description:
To access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links field
Additional Links:
http://jcem.endojournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/83/3/765

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorLaurberg, P-
dc.contributor.authorPedersen, K M-
dc.contributor.authorHreidarsson, A-
dc.contributor.authorSigfusson, N-
dc.contributor.authorIversen, E-
dc.contributor.authorKnudsen, P R-
dc.date.accessioned2009-02-20T13:39:44Z-
dc.date.available2009-02-20T13:39:44Z-
dc.date.issued1998-03-01-
dc.date.submitted2009-02-20-
dc.identifier.citationJ. Clin. Endocrinol. Metab. 1998, 83(3):765-9en
dc.identifier.issn0021-972X-
dc.identifier.pmid9506723-
dc.identifier.doi10.1210/jc.83.3.765-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/49713-
dc.descriptionTo access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links fielden
dc.description.abstractThyroid abnormalities are common in all populations, but it is difficult to compare results of epidemiological studies, because different methods have been used for evaluation. We studied the importance of the population iodine intake level for the prevalence rate of various thyroid abnormalities in elderly subjects. Random samples of elderly subjects (68 yr) were selected from the central person registers in Jutland, Denmark, with low (n = 423) and, in Iceland, with longstanding relatively high (n = 100) iodine intake. Females from Jutland had a high prevalence of goiter or previous goiter surgery (12.2%), compared with males from Jutland (3.2%) and females (1.9%) and males (2.2%) from Iceland. Abnormal thyroid function was very common in both areas, with serum TSH outside the reference range in 13.5% of subjects from Jutland and 19% of those from Iceland. In Jutland, it was mainly thyroid hyperfunction (9.7% had low, 3.8% had high serum TSH), whereas in Iceland, it was impaired thyroid function (1% had low, 18% had high serum TSH). All subjects with serum TSH more than 10 mU/L had autoantibodies in serum, but antibodies were, in general, more common in Jutland than in Iceland. Thus, thyroid abnormalities in populations with low iodine intake and those with high iodine intake develop in opposite directions: goiter and thyroid hyperfunction when iodine intake is relatively low, and impaired thyroid function when iodine intake is relatively high. Probably, mild iodine deficiency partly protects against autoimmune thyroid disease. Thyroid autoantibodies may be markers of an autoimmune process in the thyroid or secondary to the development of goiter.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherEndocrine Societyen
dc.relation.urlhttp://jcem.endojournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/83/3/765en
dc.subject.meshAgeden
dc.subject.meshAgingen
dc.subject.meshAntibodiesen
dc.subject.meshDenmarken
dc.subject.meshDieten
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshGoiteren
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshIcelanden
dc.subject.meshIodineen
dc.subject.meshMaleen
dc.subject.meshPrevalenceen
dc.subject.meshThyroglobulinen
dc.subject.meshThyroid Diseasesen
dc.subject.meshThyroid Glanden
dc.subject.meshThyrotropinen
dc.titleIodine intake and the pattern of thyroid disorders: a comparative epidemiological study of thyroid abnormalities in the elderly in Iceland and in Jutland, Denmarken
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Endocrinology and Internal Medicine, Aalborg Hospital, Denmark.en
dc.identifier.journalJournal of clinical endocrinology and metabolismen

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