Effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) on cognition, behavior, and the rest-activity rhythm in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, combined type

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2336/5130
Title:
Effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) on cognition, behavior, and the rest-activity rhythm in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, combined type
Authors:
Jonsdottir, Solveig; Bouma, Anke; Sergeant, Joseph A; Scherder, Erik J A
Citation:
Neurorehabil Neural Repair 2004, 18(4):212-21
Issue Date:
1-Dec-2004
Abstract:
OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to examine the effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) on cognition, behavior, and the rest-activity rhythm in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, combined type (ADHD-CT). METHODS: Twenty-two children diagnosed with ADHD-CT received TENS treatment during 6 weeks, 2 times 30 min a day. Neuropsychological tests were administered to assess cognition, parent/teacher behavioral rating scales were used to measure behavior, and actigraphy was used to assess the rest-activity rhythm. RESULTS: TENS appeared to have a moderate beneficial influence on cognitive functions that load particularly on executive function. There was also improvement in behavior as measured by parent/teacher behavioral rating scales. Moreover, motor restlessness during sleep and motor activity during the day decreased by TENS. CONCLUSIONS: The effects of TENS in children with ADHD are modest but encouraging and warrant further research.
Description:
To access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links field
Additional Links:
http://nnr.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/18/4/212

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorJonsdottir, Solveig-
dc.contributor.authorBouma, Anke-
dc.contributor.authorSergeant, Joseph A-
dc.contributor.authorScherder, Erik J A-
dc.date.accessioned2006-10-11T12:25:14Z-
dc.date.available2006-10-11T12:25:14Z-
dc.date.issued2004-12-01-
dc.identifier.citationNeurorehabil Neural Repair 2004, 18(4):212-21en
dc.identifier.issn1545-9683-
dc.identifier.pmid15537992-
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/1545968304270759-
dc.identifier.otherPSD12-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/5130-
dc.descriptionTo access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links fielden
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to examine the effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) on cognition, behavior, and the rest-activity rhythm in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, combined type (ADHD-CT). METHODS: Twenty-two children diagnosed with ADHD-CT received TENS treatment during 6 weeks, 2 times 30 min a day. Neuropsychological tests were administered to assess cognition, parent/teacher behavioral rating scales were used to measure behavior, and actigraphy was used to assess the rest-activity rhythm. RESULTS: TENS appeared to have a moderate beneficial influence on cognitive functions that load particularly on executive function. There was also improvement in behavior as measured by parent/teacher behavioral rating scales. Moreover, motor restlessness during sleep and motor activity during the day decreased by TENS. CONCLUSIONS: The effects of TENS in children with ADHD are modest but encouraging and warrant further research.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSage Publicationsen
dc.relation.urlhttp://nnr.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/18/4/212en
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten
dc.subject.meshAttention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivityen
dc.subject.meshChilden
dc.subject.meshChild Behavioren
dc.subject.meshCircadian Rhythmen
dc.subject.meshCognitionen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshMotor Activityen
dc.subject.meshTranscutaneous Electric Nerve Stimulationen
dc.subject.otherMaleen
dc.titleEffects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) on cognition, behavior, and the rest-activity rhythm in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, combined typeen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalNeurorehabilitation and neural repairen
dc.format.digYES-
All Items in Hirsla are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.