Is smoking an independent risk factor for invasive cervical cancer? A nested case-control study within Nordic biobanks

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2336/54453
Title:
Is smoking an independent risk factor for invasive cervical cancer? A nested case-control study within Nordic biobanks
Authors:
Kapeu, Aline Simen; Luostarinen, Tapio; Jellum, Egil; Dillner, Joakim; Hakama, Matti; Koskela, Pentti; Lenner, Per; Löve, Arthur; Mahlamaki, Eija; Thoresen, Steinar; Tryggvadottir, Laufey; Wadell, Göran; Youngman, Linda; Lehtinen, Matti
Citation:
Am. J. Epidemiol. 2009, 169(4):480-8
Issue Date:
15-Feb-2009
Abstract:
The strong correlation between smoking and exposure to oncogenic human papillomaviruses (HPVs) has made it difficult to verify the independent role of smoking in cervical carcinogenesis. Thus, the authors evaluated this role. Five large Nordic serum banks containing samples from more than 1,000,000 subjects were linked with nationwide cancer registries (1973-2003). Serum samples were retrieved from 588 women who developed invasive cervical cancer and 2,861 matched controls. The samples were analyzed for cotinine (a biomarker of tobacco exposure) and antibodies to HPV types 16 and 18, herpes simplex virus type 2, and Chlamydia trachomatis. Smoking was associated with the risk of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) among HPV16- and/or HPV18-seropositive heavy smokers (odds ratio=2.7, 95% confidence interval: 1.7, 4.3). A similar risk of SCC (odds ratio=3.2, 95% confidence interval: 2.6, 4.0) was found in heavy smokers after adjustment for HPV16/18 antibodies. The point estimates increased with increasing age at diagnosis and increasing cotinine level. This study confirms that smoking is an independent risk factor for cervical cancer/SCC in women infected with oncogenic HPVs. These findings emphasize the importance of cervical cancer prevention among women exposed to tobacco smoke.
Description:
To access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links field
Additional Links:
http://aje.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/169/4/480

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorKapeu, Aline Simen-
dc.contributor.authorLuostarinen, Tapio-
dc.contributor.authorJellum, Egil-
dc.contributor.authorDillner, Joakim-
dc.contributor.authorHakama, Matti-
dc.contributor.authorKoskela, Pentti-
dc.contributor.authorLenner, Per-
dc.contributor.authorLöve, Arthur-
dc.contributor.authorMahlamaki, Eija-
dc.contributor.authorThoresen, Steinar-
dc.contributor.authorTryggvadottir, Laufey-
dc.contributor.authorWadell, Göran-
dc.contributor.authorYoungman, Linda-
dc.contributor.authorLehtinen, Matti-
dc.date.accessioned2009-03-12T09:28:18Z-
dc.date.available2009-03-12T09:28:18Z-
dc.date.issued2009-02-15-
dc.date.submitted2009-03-12-
dc.identifier.citationAm. J. Epidemiol. 2009, 169(4):480-8en
dc.identifier.issn1476-6256-
dc.identifier.pmid19074773-
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/aje/kwn354-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/54453-
dc.descriptionTo access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links fielden
dc.description.abstractThe strong correlation between smoking and exposure to oncogenic human papillomaviruses (HPVs) has made it difficult to verify the independent role of smoking in cervical carcinogenesis. Thus, the authors evaluated this role. Five large Nordic serum banks containing samples from more than 1,000,000 subjects were linked with nationwide cancer registries (1973-2003). Serum samples were retrieved from 588 women who developed invasive cervical cancer and 2,861 matched controls. The samples were analyzed for cotinine (a biomarker of tobacco exposure) and antibodies to HPV types 16 and 18, herpes simplex virus type 2, and Chlamydia trachomatis. Smoking was associated with the risk of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) among HPV16- and/or HPV18-seropositive heavy smokers (odds ratio=2.7, 95% confidence interval: 1.7, 4.3). A similar risk of SCC (odds ratio=3.2, 95% confidence interval: 2.6, 4.0) was found in heavy smokers after adjustment for HPV16/18 antibodies. The point estimates increased with increasing age at diagnosis and increasing cotinine level. This study confirms that smoking is an independent risk factor for cervical cancer/SCC in women infected with oncogenic HPVs. These findings emphasize the importance of cervical cancer prevention among women exposed to tobacco smoke.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherOxford University Pressen
dc.relation.urlhttp://aje.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/169/4/480en
dc.subject.meshAdenocarcinomaen
dc.subject.meshAdulten
dc.subject.meshAgeden
dc.subject.meshBiological Markersen
dc.subject.meshCase-Control Studiesen
dc.subject.meshChlamydia trachomatisen
dc.subject.meshConfounding Factors (Epidemiology)en
dc.subject.meshCotinineen
dc.subject.meshEuropeen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshHerpesvirus 2, Humanen
dc.subject.meshHuman papillomavirus 16en
dc.subject.meshHuman papillomavirus 18en
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshImmunoglobulin Gen
dc.subject.meshLogistic Modelsen
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden
dc.subject.meshNeoplasms, Squamous Cellen
dc.subject.meshOncogenesen
dc.subject.meshPregnancyen
dc.subject.meshRegistriesen
dc.subject.meshRisk Factorsen
dc.subject.meshSmokingen
dc.subject.meshTumor Virus Infectionsen
dc.subject.meshUterine Cervical Neoplasmsen
dc.titleIs smoking an independent risk factor for invasive cervical cancer? A nested case-control study within Nordic biobanksen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentNational Public Health Institute, P.O. Box 310, 90101 Oulu, Finland. kapeu_aline@yahoo.fren
dc.identifier.journalAmerican journal of epidemiologyen

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