A practice survey on vasopressor and inotropic drug therapy in Scandinavian intensive care units

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2336/5512
Title:
A practice survey on vasopressor and inotropic drug therapy in Scandinavian intensive care units
Authors:
Oldner, A; Rossi, P; Karason, S; Aneman, A
Citation:
Acta Anaesthesiol Scand 2003, 47(6):693-701
Issue Date:
1-Jul-2003
Abstract:
BACKGROUND: This practice survey was performed to analyse the indications for use of vasopressor/inotropic drugs, preferred drugs and doses as well as concomitant monitoring and desired haemodynamic target values in Scandinavian ICUs. An internet-based reporting system was implemented. METHODS: A total of 223 ICUs were identified in the Scandinavian countries and invited to participate in a one-day point-prevalence study. An internet-based database was constructed and a practice survey protocol designed to identify haemodynamic monitoring, indications for vasopressor/inotropic drug-therapy, fluids used for volume loading, pretreatment circulatory state, actual and targeted haemodynamic variables. Patients were eligible for the study if on vasopressor/inotropic drug-therapy for more than 4 h. RESULTS: A total of 114 ICUs participated. A total of 114 adult patients matched the inclusion criteria. Sixty-seven per cent of the patients had received vasopressor/inotropic drug-treatment for >24 h and 32% received more than one drug. Arterial hypotension (92%) and oliguria (50%) were most common indications. Fluid loading prior to therapy was reported in 87% of patients. Dopamine (47%) and noradrenaline (44%) were the most commonly used drugs followed by dobutamine (24%). No other drug exceeded 6%. Non-catecholamine drugs were rarely used even in cardiac failure patients. Invasive arterial pressure was monitored in 95% of patients, pulmonary artery catheters were used in 19%. Other cardiac output monitoring techniques were used in 8.5% of the patients. CONCLUSION: Dopamine and noradrenaline seem to be the most commonly used inotropic/vasopressor drugs in Scandinavia. Traditional indications for inotropic/vasopressor support as hypotension and oliguria seem to be most common. Invasive monitoring was used in almost all patients, whereas a limited use of pulmonary artery catheters was noted. The internet-based reporting system proved to be an efficient tool for data collection.
Additional Links:
http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi/full/10.1034/j.1399-6576.2003.00129.x

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorOldner, A-
dc.contributor.authorRossi, P-
dc.contributor.authorKarason, S-
dc.contributor.authorAneman, A-
dc.date.accessioned2006-10-23T11:26:10Z-
dc.date.available2006-10-23T11:26:10Z-
dc.date.issued2003-07-01-
dc.identifier.citationActa Anaesthesiol Scand 2003, 47(6):693-701en
dc.identifier.issn0001-5172-
dc.identifier.pmid12803586-
dc.identifier.doi10.1034/j.1399-6576.2003.00129.x-
dc.identifier.otherAAA12-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/5512-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: This practice survey was performed to analyse the indications for use of vasopressor/inotropic drugs, preferred drugs and doses as well as concomitant monitoring and desired haemodynamic target values in Scandinavian ICUs. An internet-based reporting system was implemented. METHODS: A total of 223 ICUs were identified in the Scandinavian countries and invited to participate in a one-day point-prevalence study. An internet-based database was constructed and a practice survey protocol designed to identify haemodynamic monitoring, indications for vasopressor/inotropic drug-therapy, fluids used for volume loading, pretreatment circulatory state, actual and targeted haemodynamic variables. Patients were eligible for the study if on vasopressor/inotropic drug-therapy for more than 4 h. RESULTS: A total of 114 ICUs participated. A total of 114 adult patients matched the inclusion criteria. Sixty-seven per cent of the patients had received vasopressor/inotropic drug-treatment for >24 h and 32% received more than one drug. Arterial hypotension (92%) and oliguria (50%) were most common indications. Fluid loading prior to therapy was reported in 87% of patients. Dopamine (47%) and noradrenaline (44%) were the most commonly used drugs followed by dobutamine (24%). No other drug exceeded 6%. Non-catecholamine drugs were rarely used even in cardiac failure patients. Invasive arterial pressure was monitored in 95% of patients, pulmonary artery catheters were used in 19%. Other cardiac output monitoring techniques were used in 8.5% of the patients. CONCLUSION: Dopamine and noradrenaline seem to be the most commonly used inotropic/vasopressor drugs in Scandinavia. Traditional indications for inotropic/vasopressor support as hypotension and oliguria seem to be most common. Invasive monitoring was used in almost all patients, whereas a limited use of pulmonary artery catheters was noted. The internet-based reporting system proved to be an efficient tool for data collection.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBlackwell Munksgaarden
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi/full/10.1034/j.1399-6576.2003.00129.xen
dc.subject.meshCardiotonic Agentsen
dc.subject.meshCardiovascular Agentsen
dc.subject.meshData Collectionen
dc.subject.meshDatabases, Factualen
dc.subject.meshDrug Utilizationen
dc.subject.meshFluid Therapyen
dc.subject.meshHemodynamic Processesen
dc.subject.meshIntensive Care Unitsen
dc.subject.meshMonitoring, Physiologicen
dc.subject.meshPlasma Substitutesen
dc.subject.meshScandinaviaen
dc.titleA practice survey on vasopressor and inotropic drug therapy in Scandinavian intensive care unitsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalActa anaesthesiologica Scandinavicaen
dc.format.digYES-

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