Dietary intake of 10- to 16-year-old children and adolescents in central and northern Europe and association with the incidence of type 1 diabetes

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2336/5539
Title:
Dietary intake of 10- to 16-year-old children and adolescents in central and northern Europe and association with the incidence of type 1 diabetes
Authors:
Thorsdottir, I; Ramel, A
Citation:
Ann. Nutr. Metab. 2003, 47(6):267-75
Issue Date:
1-Nov-2003
Abstract:
BACKGROUND/AIMS: The highest incidence of type 1 diabetes is among 10- to 15-year-old adolescents. The aim of this study was to investigate a possible relationship between the dietary intake of this group and the incidence of type 1 diabetes. METHODS: Dietary intake data of 10- to 16-year-old adolescents (n = 4,701) from 11 European countries and the incidence rates of type 1 diabetes were used to examine the relation between food and the disease. RESULTS: The incidence of type 1 diabetes correlated with the consumption of total fat (r = 0.674; p = 0.023), saturated fatty acids (r = 0.714; p = 0.047) and the intake of fruits and vegetables (r = 0.786; p = 0.036). Fruit intake or vegetable intake alone did not correlate with the incidence. Cow's milk and animal product consumption correlated with the incidence when Icelandic data were excluded (r = 0.829; p = 0.042 and r = 0.999; p = 0.001). A negative correlation of borderline significance was found between sugar intake and the incidence of type 1 diabetes (r = -0.721; p = 0.068). CONCLUSION: The results indicate for the first time that an adolescent's diet high in fat and fruits and vegetables is associated with an increased risk of type 1 diabetes. Fruit or vegetable intake separately was not associated with type 1 diabetes. It is important to characterize and minimize diabetogenic factors in fruits and vegetables as the general health benefits of a diet rich in fruits and vegetables are well known and such a diet is therefore recommended. This study supports previous research about the importance of cow's milk and animal products in the aetiology of type 1 diabetes.
Additional Links:
http://www.karger.com/DOI/10.1159/000072399

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorThorsdottir, I-
dc.contributor.authorRamel, A-
dc.date.accessioned2006-10-24T08:55:01Z-
dc.date.available2006-10-24T08:55:01Z-
dc.date.issued2003-11-01-
dc.identifier.citationAnn. Nutr. Metab. 2003, 47(6):267-75en
dc.identifier.issn0250-6807-
dc.identifier.pmid14520022-
dc.identifier.doi10.1159/000072399-
dc.identifier.otherNUR12-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/5539-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND/AIMS: The highest incidence of type 1 diabetes is among 10- to 15-year-old adolescents. The aim of this study was to investigate a possible relationship between the dietary intake of this group and the incidence of type 1 diabetes. METHODS: Dietary intake data of 10- to 16-year-old adolescents (n = 4,701) from 11 European countries and the incidence rates of type 1 diabetes were used to examine the relation between food and the disease. RESULTS: The incidence of type 1 diabetes correlated with the consumption of total fat (r = 0.674; p = 0.023), saturated fatty acids (r = 0.714; p = 0.047) and the intake of fruits and vegetables (r = 0.786; p = 0.036). Fruit intake or vegetable intake alone did not correlate with the incidence. Cow's milk and animal product consumption correlated with the incidence when Icelandic data were excluded (r = 0.829; p = 0.042 and r = 0.999; p = 0.001). A negative correlation of borderline significance was found between sugar intake and the incidence of type 1 diabetes (r = -0.721; p = 0.068). CONCLUSION: The results indicate for the first time that an adolescent's diet high in fat and fruits and vegetables is associated with an increased risk of type 1 diabetes. Fruit or vegetable intake separately was not associated with type 1 diabetes. It is important to characterize and minimize diabetogenic factors in fruits and vegetables as the general health benefits of a diet rich in fruits and vegetables are well known and such a diet is therefore recommended. This study supports previous research about the importance of cow's milk and animal products in the aetiology of type 1 diabetes.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherKargeren
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.karger.com/DOI/10.1159/000072399en
dc.subject.meshAdolescent Nutritionen
dc.subject.meshChild Nutritionen
dc.subject.meshDairy Productsen
dc.subject.meshDiabetes Mellitus, Type 1en
dc.subject.meshDieten
dc.subject.meshDiet Surveysen
dc.subject.meshDietary Fatsen
dc.subject.meshMilken
dc.subject.meshVegetablesen
dc.titleDietary intake of 10- to 16-year-old children and adolescents in central and northern Europe and association with the incidence of type 1 diabetesen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalAnnals of nutrition & metabolismen
dc.format.digYES-

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