Familial risk of colon and rectal cancer in Iceland: evidence for different etiologic factors?

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2336/6169
Title:
Familial risk of colon and rectal cancer in Iceland: evidence for different etiologic factors?
Authors:
Stefansson, Tryggvi; Moller, Pall H; Sigurdsson, Fridbjorn; Steingrimsson, Eirikur; Eldon, Bjarki Jonsson
Citation:
Int J Cancer 2006, 119(2):304-8
Issue Date:
15-Jul-2006
Abstract:
The aim of this study was to characterize the familial risk of colon and rectal cancer using 2 population-based registries in Iceland, the Icelandic Cancer Registry and a genealogy database. The standardized incidence ratio (SIR) was used to estimate the risk among relatives of colorectal cancer index cases diagnosed in Iceland over a 46-year period (1955-2000). The 2,770 colorectal cancer patients had 23,272 first-degree relatives. Among first-degree relatives, there was an increased risk of both colon (SIR 1.47, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.34-1.62) and rectal cancer (SIR 1.24, 95% CI 1.04-1.47). An increased risk of colon cancer was observed among siblings of colon cancer patients (SIR 2.03, 95% CI 1.76-2.33), whereas no such increase was observed for parents or offspring. Furthermore, the risk of rectal cancer was only increased among brothers (SIR 2.46 95% CI 1.46-3.89) of rectal cancer patients and not among their sisters (SIR 1.0 95% CI 0.40-2.06). The added risk of colon cancer among first-degree relatives was independent of site of colon cancer in the proband. Our results confirm that family history of colorectal cancer is a risk factor for the disease. However, family history has a different association with colon cancer than with rectal cancer, suggesting that the 2 cancer types may have different etiologic factors. Our results have implications for colon and rectal cancer screening programs.
Description:
To access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links field
Additional Links:
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ijc.21835

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorStefansson, Tryggvi-
dc.contributor.authorMoller, Pall H-
dc.contributor.authorSigurdsson, Fridbjorn-
dc.contributor.authorSteingrimsson, Eirikur-
dc.contributor.authorEldon, Bjarki Jonsson-
dc.date.accessioned2006-11-22T09:01:48Z-
dc.date.available2006-11-22T09:01:48Z-
dc.date.issued2006-07-15-
dc.date.submitted2006-11-22-
dc.identifier.citationInt J Cancer 2006, 119(2):304-8en
dc.identifier.pmid16477631-
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/ijc.21835-
dc.identifier.otherMAO12en
dc.identifier.otherSAG12en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/6169-
dc.descriptionTo access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links fielden
dc.description.abstractThe aim of this study was to characterize the familial risk of colon and rectal cancer using 2 population-based registries in Iceland, the Icelandic Cancer Registry and a genealogy database. The standardized incidence ratio (SIR) was used to estimate the risk among relatives of colorectal cancer index cases diagnosed in Iceland over a 46-year period (1955-2000). The 2,770 colorectal cancer patients had 23,272 first-degree relatives. Among first-degree relatives, there was an increased risk of both colon (SIR 1.47, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.34-1.62) and rectal cancer (SIR 1.24, 95% CI 1.04-1.47). An increased risk of colon cancer was observed among siblings of colon cancer patients (SIR 2.03, 95% CI 1.76-2.33), whereas no such increase was observed for parents or offspring. Furthermore, the risk of rectal cancer was only increased among brothers (SIR 2.46 95% CI 1.46-3.89) of rectal cancer patients and not among their sisters (SIR 1.0 95% CI 0.40-2.06). The added risk of colon cancer among first-degree relatives was independent of site of colon cancer in the proband. Our results confirm that family history of colorectal cancer is a risk factor for the disease. However, family history has a different association with colon cancer than with rectal cancer, suggesting that the 2 cancer types may have different etiologic factors. Our results have implications for colon and rectal cancer screening programs.en
dc.format.extent148283 bytes-
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ijc.21835en
dc.subject.meshAgeden
dc.subject.meshAged, 80 and overen
dc.subject.meshColonic Neoplasmsen
dc.subject.meshFamilyen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshIceland/epidemiologyen
dc.subject.meshIncidenceen
dc.subject.meshMaleen
dc.subject.meshRectal Neoplasmsen
dc.subject.meshRegistriesen
dc.subject.meshRisk Assessmenten
dc.subject.meshRisk Factorsen
dc.subject.meshSex Factorsen
dc.subject.meshColonic Neoplasmsen
dc.titleFamilial risk of colon and rectal cancer in Iceland: evidence for different etiologic factors?en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.format.digYES-

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