Cesarean section trends in the Nordic Countries - a comparative analysis with the Robson classification.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2336/620224
Title:
Cesarean section trends in the Nordic Countries - a comparative analysis with the Robson classification.
Authors:
Pyykönen, Aura; Gissler, Mika; Løkkegaard, Ellen; Bergholt, Thomas; Rasmussen, Steen C; Smárason, Alexander; Bjarnadóttir, Ragnheiður I; Másdóttir, Birna B; Källén, Karin; Klungsoyr, Kari; Albrechtsen, Susanne; Skjeldestad, Finn E; Tapper, Anna-Maija
Citation:
Cesarean section trends in the Nordic Countries - a comparative analysis with the Robson classification. 2017, 96 (5):607-616 Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand
Issue Date:
May-2017
Abstract:
The cesarean rates are low but increasing in most Nordic countries. Using the Robson classification, we analyzed which obstetric groups have contributed to the changes in the cesarean rates.; Retrospective population-based registry study including all deliveries (3 398 586) between 2000 and 2011 in Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden. The Robson group distribution, cesarean rate and contribution of each Robson group were analyzed nationally for four 3-year time periods. For each country, we analyzed which groups contributed to the change in the total cesarean rate.; Between the first and the last time period studied, the total cesarean rates increased in Denmark (16.4 to 20.7%), Norway (14.4 to 16.5%) and Sweden (15.5 to 17.1%), but towards the end of our study, the cesarean rates stabilized or even decreased. The increase was explained mainly by increases in the absolute contribution from R5 (women with previous cesarean) and R2a (induced labor on nulliparous). In Finland, the cesarean rate decreased slightly (16.5 to 16.2%) mainly due to decrease among R5 and R6-R7 (breech presentation, nulliparous/multiparous). In Iceland, the cesarean rate decreased in all parturient groups (17.6 to 15.3%), most essentially among nulliparous women despite the increased induction rates.; The increased total cesarean rates in the Nordic countries are explained by increased cesarean rates among nulliparous women, and by an increased percentage of women with previous cesarean. Meanwhile, induction rates on nulliparous increased significantly, but the impact on the total cesarean rate was unclear. The Robson classification facilitates benchmarking and targeting efforts for lowering the cesarean rates.
Description:
To access publisher's full text version of this article click on the hyperlink below
Additional Links:
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/aogs.13108/epdf
Rights:
Archived with thanks to Acta obstetricia et gynecologica Scandinavica

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorPyykönen, Auraen
dc.contributor.authorGissler, Mikaen
dc.contributor.authorLøkkegaard, Ellenen
dc.contributor.authorBergholt, Thomasen
dc.contributor.authorRasmussen, Steen Cen
dc.contributor.authorSmárason, Alexanderen
dc.contributor.authorBjarnadóttir, Ragnheiður Ien
dc.contributor.authorMásdóttir, Birna Ben
dc.contributor.authorKällén, Karinen
dc.contributor.authorKlungsoyr, Karien
dc.contributor.authorAlbrechtsen, Susanneen
dc.contributor.authorSkjeldestad, Finn Een
dc.contributor.authorTapper, Anna-Maijaen
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-14T14:19:26Z-
dc.date.available2017-06-14T14:19:26Z-
dc.date.issued2017-05-
dc.date.submitted2017-
dc.identifier.citationCesarean section trends in the Nordic Countries - a comparative analysis with the Robson classification. 2017, 96 (5):607-616 Acta Obstet Gynecol Scanden
dc.identifier.issn1600-0412-
dc.identifier.pmid28176334-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/aogs.13108-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/620224-
dc.descriptionTo access publisher's full text version of this article click on the hyperlink belowen
dc.description.abstractThe cesarean rates are low but increasing in most Nordic countries. Using the Robson classification, we analyzed which obstetric groups have contributed to the changes in the cesarean rates.en
dc.description.abstractRetrospective population-based registry study including all deliveries (3 398 586) between 2000 and 2011 in Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden. The Robson group distribution, cesarean rate and contribution of each Robson group were analyzed nationally for four 3-year time periods. For each country, we analyzed which groups contributed to the change in the total cesarean rate.en
dc.description.abstractBetween the first and the last time period studied, the total cesarean rates increased in Denmark (16.4 to 20.7%), Norway (14.4 to 16.5%) and Sweden (15.5 to 17.1%), but towards the end of our study, the cesarean rates stabilized or even decreased. The increase was explained mainly by increases in the absolute contribution from R5 (women with previous cesarean) and R2a (induced labor on nulliparous). In Finland, the cesarean rate decreased slightly (16.5 to 16.2%) mainly due to decrease among R5 and R6-R7 (breech presentation, nulliparous/multiparous). In Iceland, the cesarean rate decreased in all parturient groups (17.6 to 15.3%), most essentially among nulliparous women despite the increased induction rates.en
dc.description.abstractThe increased total cesarean rates in the Nordic countries are explained by increased cesarean rates among nulliparous women, and by an increased percentage of women with previous cesarean. Meanwhile, induction rates on nulliparous increased significantly, but the impact on the total cesarean rate was unclear. The Robson classification facilitates benchmarking and targeting efforts for lowering the cesarean rates.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWileyen
dc.relation.urlhttp://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/aogs.13108/epdfen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Acta obstetricia et gynecologica Scandinavicaen
dc.subjectKeisaraskurðiren
dc.subjectNorðurlandabúaren
dc.subjectNorðurlönden
dc.subjectOAGen
dc.subject.meshCesarean Sectionen
dc.subject.meshScandinavian and Nordic Countriesen
dc.titleCesarean section trends in the Nordic Countries - a comparative analysis with the Robson classification.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.department[ 1 ] Univ Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland Show the Organization-Enhanced name(s) [ 2 ] Helsinki Univ Hosp, Dept Obstet & Gynecol, Helsinki, Finland Show the Organization-Enhanced name(s) [ 3 ] Natl Inst Hlth & Welf THL, Helsinki, Finland Show the Organization-Enhanced name(s) [ 4 ] Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Div Family Med, Stockholm, Sweden Show the Organization-Enhanced name(s) [ 5 ] Univ Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark [ 6 ] Nordsjaelland Hosp, Dept Obstet & Gynecol, Hillerod, Denmark Show the Organization-Enhanced name(s) [ 7 ] Rigshosp, Dept Obstet, Copenhagen, Denmark [ 8 ] Iceland Birth Registry, Akureyri, Iceland [ 9 ] Univ Akureyri, Inst Hlth Sci Res, Akureyri, Iceland [ 10 ] Landspitali Univ Hosp, Reykajvik, Iceland [ 11 ] Swedish Natl Board Hlth & Welf, Stockholm, Sweden Show the Organization-Enhanced name(s) [ 12 ] Lund Univ, Lund, Sweden [ 13 ] Norwegian Inst Publ Hlth, Dept Hlth Registries, Bergen, Norway Show the Organization-Enhanced name(s) [ 14 ] Univ Bergen, Dept Clin Sci, Bergen, Norway [ 15 ] Haukeland Hosp, Bergen, Norway Show the Organization-Enhanced name(s) [ 16 ] UiT Arctic Univ Norway, Dept Community Med, Fac Hlth Sci, Tromso, Norway [ 17 ] Hyvinkaa Hosp, Hyvinkaa, Finlanden
dc.identifier.journalActa obstetricia et gynecologica Scandinavicaen
dc.rights.accessNational Consortium - Landsaðganguren

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