2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2336/620431
Title:
Fundus imaging in newborn children with wide-field scanning laser ophthalmoscope
Authors:
Magnusdottir, Vigdis; Vehmeijer, Wouter B. ( 0000-0002-2616-6397 ) ; Eliasdottir, Thorunn S.; Hardarson, Sveinn H.; Schalij-Delfos, Nicoline E.; Stefánsson, Einar
Citation:
Fundus imaging in newborn children with wide-field scanning laser ophthalmoscope 2017, 95 (8):842 Acta Ophthalmologica
Issue Date:
Dec-2017
Abstract:
PURPOSE: Current fundus imaging in newborn babies requires mydriatics, eye specula and corneal contact. We propose that a scanning laser ophthalmoscope (SLO) allows ultra wide-field imaging with reduced stress for the child. METHODS: This prospective observational single centre study was conducted in Landspítali, University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland. In this study, a noncontact wide-field SLO (Optomap 200Tx) was used to image the retina in healthy full-term newborns without the use of mydriatics or eye specula. The child was held by one of the parents, while one of the researchers supported the child's head in front of the SLO camera for alignment and opened the eye with either a finger or a cotton tip. RESULTS: Fifty-nine participants were recruited (34 females). The mean age was 16 days, and the mean gestational age was 40 ± 1 weeks at the time of imaging. Ultra-wide-field (200°) images were obtained of 44 participants. Twenty-seven participants (61%) had at least one ultra wide-field image with the optic disc and vessel segments in all quadrants of the fundus visible and in focus. No retinal pathology was found in the participants with the exception of one participant with small retinal haemorrhages. CONCLUSION: Scanning laser ophthalmoscope (SLO) ultra-wide-field fundus imaging is feasible in healthy full-term newborns without corneal contact, eye speculum or mydriatics. This approach could be an improvement for retinal imaging in newborn infants. Eye movement of the infant, whether asleep or awake, influenced which part of the fundus was captured, but focus and image quality were generally good.
Description:
To access publisher's full text version of this article click on the hyperlink below
Additional Links:
http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/aos.13453
Rights:
Archived with thanks to Acta Ophthalmologica

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMagnusdottir, Vigdisen
dc.contributor.authorVehmeijer, Wouter B.en
dc.contributor.authorEliasdottir, Thorunn S.en
dc.contributor.authorHardarson, Sveinn H.en
dc.contributor.authorSchalij-Delfos, Nicoline E.en
dc.contributor.authorStefánsson, Einaren
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-11T17:15:40Z-
dc.date.available2018-01-11T17:15:40Z-
dc.date.issued2017-12-
dc.date.submitted2018-
dc.identifier.citationFundus imaging in newborn children with wide-field scanning laser ophthalmoscope 2017, 95 (8):842 Acta Ophthalmologicaen
dc.identifier.issn1755375X-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/aos.13453-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/620431-
dc.descriptionTo access publisher's full text version of this article click on the hyperlink belowen
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: Current fundus imaging in newborn babies requires mydriatics, eye specula and corneal contact. We propose that a scanning laser ophthalmoscope (SLO) allows ultra wide-field imaging with reduced stress for the child. METHODS: This prospective observational single centre study was conducted in Landspítali, University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland. In this study, a noncontact wide-field SLO (Optomap 200Tx) was used to image the retina in healthy full-term newborns without the use of mydriatics or eye specula. The child was held by one of the parents, while one of the researchers supported the child's head in front of the SLO camera for alignment and opened the eye with either a finger or a cotton tip. RESULTS: Fifty-nine participants were recruited (34 females). The mean age was 16 days, and the mean gestational age was 40 ± 1 weeks at the time of imaging. Ultra-wide-field (200°) images were obtained of 44 participants. Twenty-seven participants (61%) had at least one ultra wide-field image with the optic disc and vessel segments in all quadrants of the fundus visible and in focus. No retinal pathology was found in the participants with the exception of one participant with small retinal haemorrhages. CONCLUSION: Scanning laser ophthalmoscope (SLO) ultra-wide-field fundus imaging is feasible in healthy full-term newborns without corneal contact, eye speculum or mydriatics. This approach could be an improvement for retinal imaging in newborn infants. Eye movement of the infant, whether asleep or awake, influenced which part of the fundus was captured, but focus and image quality were generally good.en
dc.description.sponsorshipODAS foundation (Den Hoorn, The Netherlands) Icelandic Center for Research (Rannis) University of Iceland Research Fund Landspitali University Hospital Research Fund Helga Jonsdottir and Sigurlidi Kristjansson Memorial Funden
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWileyen
dc.relation.urlhttp://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/aos.13453en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Acta Ophthalmologicaen
dc.subjectAugnbotnaren
dc.subjectNýburaren
dc.subjectMyndgreining (læknisfræði)en
dc.subjectOPH12en
dc.subjectPTT12en
dc.subjectPER12en
dc.subject.meshFundus Oculien
dc.subject.meshInfant, Newbornen
dc.subject.meshOphthalmoscopesen
dc.subject.meshdiagnostic imagingen
dc.subject.meshMacula Luteaen
dc.titleFundus imaging in newborn children with wide-field scanning laser ophthalmoscopeen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.department[ 1 ] Univ Iceland, Landspitali Univ Hosp, Dept Ophthalmol, Reykjavik, Iceland Show more [ 2 ] Oslo Univ Hosp, Dept Ophthalmol, Oslo, Norway Show more [ 3 ] Leiden Univ, Leiden Univ Med Ctr, Dept Ophthalmol, Leiden, Netherlandsen
dc.identifier.journalActa Ophthalmologicaen
dc.rights.accessNational Consortium - Landsaðganguren
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Ophthalmology; Landspítali University Hospital; University of Iceland; Reykjavik Iceland-
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Ophthalmology; Leiden University Medical Center; University of Leiden; Leiden Netherlands-
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Ophthalmology; Landspítali University Hospital; University of Iceland; Reykjavik Iceland-
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Ophthalmology; Landspítali University Hospital; University of Iceland; Reykjavik Iceland-
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Ophthalmology; Leiden University Medical Center; University of Leiden; Leiden Netherlands-
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Ophthalmology; Landspítali University Hospital; University of Iceland; Reykjavik Iceland-
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