Recognizable clinical subtypes of obstructive sleep apnea across international sleep centers: a cluster analysis

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2336/620554
Title:
Recognizable clinical subtypes of obstructive sleep apnea across international sleep centers: a cluster analysis
Authors:
Keenan, Brendan T; Kim, Jinyoung; Singh, Bhajan; Bittencourt, Lia; Chen, Ning-Hung; Cistulli, Peter A ( 0000-0002-7920-4924 ) ; Magalang, Ulysses J; McArdle, Nigel; Mindel, Jesse W; Benediktsdottir, Bryndis; Arnardottir, Erna Sif; Prochnow, Lisa Kristin; Penzel, Thomas; Sanner, Bernd; Schwab, Richard J; Shin, Chol; Sutherland, Kate; Tufik, Sergio; Maislin, Greg; Gislason, Thorarinn; Pack, Allan I ( 0000-0002-2879-0484 )
Citation:
Recognizable clinical subtypes of obstructive sleep apnea across international sleep centers: a cluster analysis 2018, 41 (3) Sleep
Issue Date:
Mar-2018
Abstract:
STUDY OBJECTIVES: A recent study of patients with moderate-severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in Iceland identified three clinical clusters based on symptoms and comorbidities. We sought to verify this finding in a new cohort in Iceland and examine the generalizability of OSA clusters in an international ethnically diverse cohort. METHODS: Using data on 972 patients with moderate-severe OSA (apnea-hypopnea index [AHI] ≥ 15 events per hour) recruited from the Sleep Apnea Global Interdisciplinary Consortium (SAGIC), we performed a latent class analysis of 18 self-reported symptom variables, hypertension, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes. RESULTS: The original OSA clusters of disturbed sleep, minimally symptomatic, and excessively sleepy replicated among 215 SAGIC patients from Iceland. These clusters also generalized to 757 patients from five other countries. The three clusters had similar average AHI values in both Iceland and the international samples, suggesting clusters are not driven by OSA severity; differences in age, gender, and body mass index were also generally small. Within the international sample, the three original clusters were expanded to five optimal clusters: three were similar to those in Iceland (labeled disturbed sleep, minimal symptoms, and upper airway symptoms with sleepiness) and two were new, less symptomatic clusters (labeled upper airway symptoms dominant and sleepiness dominant). The five clusters showed differences in demographics and AHI, although all were middle-aged (44.6-54.5 years), obese (30.6-35.9 kg/m2), and had severe OSA (42.0-51.4 events per hour) on average. CONCLUSIONS: Results confirm and extend previously identified clinical clusters in OSA. These clusters provide an opportunity for a more personalized approach to the management of OSA.
Description:
To access publisher's full text version of this article, please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links field or click on the hyperlink at the top of the page marked Files
Additional Links:
https://academic.oup.com/sleep/article/doi/10.1093/sleep/zsx214/4791307
Rights:
Archived with thanks to Sleep

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorKeenan, Brendan Ten
dc.contributor.authorKim, Jinyoungen
dc.contributor.authorSingh, Bhajanen
dc.contributor.authorBittencourt, Liaen
dc.contributor.authorChen, Ning-Hungen
dc.contributor.authorCistulli, Peter Aen
dc.contributor.authorMagalang, Ulysses Jen
dc.contributor.authorMcArdle, Nigelen
dc.contributor.authorMindel, Jesse Wen
dc.contributor.authorBenediktsdottir, Bryndisen
dc.contributor.authorArnardottir, Erna Sifen
dc.contributor.authorProchnow, Lisa Kristinen
dc.contributor.authorPenzel, Thomasen
dc.contributor.authorSanner, Bernden
dc.contributor.authorSchwab, Richard Jen
dc.contributor.authorShin, Cholen
dc.contributor.authorSutherland, Kateen
dc.contributor.authorTufik, Sergioen
dc.contributor.authorMaislin, Gregen
dc.contributor.authorGislason, Thorarinnen
dc.contributor.authorPack, Allan Ien
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-07T11:44:43Z-
dc.date.available2018-05-07T11:44:43Z-
dc.date.issued2018-03-
dc.date.submitted2018-
dc.identifier.citationRecognizable clinical subtypes of obstructive sleep apnea across international sleep centers: a cluster analysis 2018, 41 (3) Sleepen
dc.identifier.issn0161-8105-
dc.identifier.issn1550-9109-
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/sleep/zsx214-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/620554-
dc.descriptionTo access publisher's full text version of this article, please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links field or click on the hyperlink at the top of the page marked Filesen
dc.description.abstractSTUDY OBJECTIVES: A recent study of patients with moderate-severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in Iceland identified three clinical clusters based on symptoms and comorbidities. We sought to verify this finding in a new cohort in Iceland and examine the generalizability of OSA clusters in an international ethnically diverse cohort. METHODS: Using data on 972 patients with moderate-severe OSA (apnea-hypopnea index [AHI] ≥ 15 events per hour) recruited from the Sleep Apnea Global Interdisciplinary Consortium (SAGIC), we performed a latent class analysis of 18 self-reported symptom variables, hypertension, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes. RESULTS: The original OSA clusters of disturbed sleep, minimally symptomatic, and excessively sleepy replicated among 215 SAGIC patients from Iceland. These clusters also generalized to 757 patients from five other countries. The three clusters had similar average AHI values in both Iceland and the international samples, suggesting clusters are not driven by OSA severity; differences in age, gender, and body mass index were also generally small. Within the international sample, the three original clusters were expanded to five optimal clusters: three were similar to those in Iceland (labeled disturbed sleep, minimal symptoms, and upper airway symptoms with sleepiness) and two were new, less symptomatic clusters (labeled upper airway symptoms dominant and sleepiness dominant). The five clusters showed differences in demographics and AHI, although all were middle-aged (44.6-54.5 years), obese (30.6-35.9 kg/m2), and had severe OSA (42.0-51.4 events per hour) on average. CONCLUSIONS: Results confirm and extend previously identified clinical clusters in OSA. These clusters provide an opportunity for a more personalized approach to the management of OSA.en
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Institutes of Health Conselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Cientifico e Tecnologico (CNPq) National Center For Advancing Translational Sciencesen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherOxford University Pressen
dc.relation.urlhttps://academic.oup.com/sleep/article/doi/10.1093/sleep/zsx214/4791307en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Sleepen
dc.subjectKæfisvefnen
dc.subjectPAD12en
dc.subjectNAF12en
dc.subject.meshSleep Apnea, Obstructiveen
dc.titleRecognizable clinical subtypes of obstructive sleep apnea across international sleep centers: a cluster analysisen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.department1 ] Univ Penn, Ctr Sleep & Circadian Neurobiol, Philadelphia, PA USA Show more [ 2 ] Univ Penn, Sch Nursing, Philadelphia, PA 19104 USA Show more [ 3 ] Sir Charles Gairdner Hosp, Western Australian Sleep Disorders Res Inst, Nedlands, WA, Australia Show more [ 4 ] Univ Fed Sao Paulo, Dept Psychobiol, Sao Paulo, Brazil Show more [ 5 ] Chang Gung Mem Hosp, Div Pulm Crit Care & Sleep Med, Taoyuan, Taiwan Show more [ 6 ] Univ Sydney, Northern Clin Sch, Royal North Shore Hosp, Sydney, NSW, Australia Show more [ 7 ] Univ Sydney, Charles Perkins Ctr, Sydney, NSW, Australia Show more [ 8 ] Ohio State Univ, Wexner Med Ctr, Div Pulm Allergy Crit Care & Sleep Med, Columbus, OH 43210 USA Show more [ 9 ] Landspitali Univ Hosp, Dept Sleep, Reykjavik, Iceland Show more [ 10 ] Univ Iceland, Fac Med, Reykjavik, Iceland Show more [ 11 ] Charite, Interdisciplinary Ctr Sleep Med, Berlin, Germany [ 12 ] Agaples Bethesda Krankenhaus Wuppertal, Dept Pulm Med, Wuppertal, Germany Show more [ 13 ] Korea Univ, Med Ctr, Ansan Hosp, Pulm Crit Care & Sleep Disorder Ctr, Seoul, South Koreaen
dc.identifier.journalSleepen
dc.rights.accessOpen Access - Opinn aðganguren
dc.contributor.institutionCenter for Sleep and Circadian Neurobiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA-
dc.contributor.institutionCenter for Sleep and Circadian Neurobiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA-
dc.contributor.institutionSir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Western Australian Sleep Disorders Research Institute, Nedlands, Western Australia, Australia-
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Psychobiology, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil-
dc.contributor.institutionDivision of Pulmonary, Critical Care, and Sleep Medicine, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taoyuan, Taiwan-
dc.contributor.institutionRoyal North Shore Hospital, Northern Clinical School, and Charles Perkins Centre University of Sydney, Australia-
dc.contributor.institutionDivision of Pulmonary, Allergy, Critical Care, and Sleep Medicine, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, OH-
dc.contributor.institutionSir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Western Australian Sleep Disorders Research Institute, Nedlands, Western Australia, Australia-
dc.contributor.institutionDivision of Pulmonary, Allergy, Critical Care, and Sleep Medicine, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, OH-
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Sleep, Landspitali University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland-
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Sleep, Landspitali University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland-
dc.contributor.institutionInterdisciplinary Center of Sleep Medicine, Charité University Hospital, Berlin, Germany-
dc.contributor.institutionInterdisciplinary Center of Sleep Medicine, Charité University Hospital, Berlin, Germany-
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Pulmonary Medicine, Agaplesion Bethesda Krankenhaus Wuppertal, Wuppertal, Germany-
dc.contributor.institutionCenter for Sleep and Circadian Neurobiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA-
dc.contributor.institutionPulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Disorder Center, Korea University Medical Center Ansan Hospital, Seoul, South Korea-
dc.contributor.institutionRoyal North Shore Hospital, Northern Clinical School, and Charles Perkins Centre University of Sydney, Australia-
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Psychobiology, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil-
dc.contributor.institutionCenter for Sleep and Circadian Neurobiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA-
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Sleep, Landspitali University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland-
dc.contributor.institutionCenter for Sleep and Circadian Neurobiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA-
dc.departmentcodePAD12, NAF12-
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