Combined effects of maternal smoking status and dietary intake related to weight gain and birth size parameters

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2336/6265
Title:
Combined effects of maternal smoking status and dietary intake related to weight gain and birth size parameters
Authors:
Olafsdottir, A S; Skuladottir, G V; Thorsdottir, I; Hauksson, A; Steingrimsdottir, L
Citation:
BJOG 2006, 113(11):1296-302
Issue Date:
1-Nov-2006
Abstract:
OBJECTIVE: To investigate the interaction of smoking status and dietary intake during pregnancy and its relationship to maternal weight gain and birth size parameters. DESIGN: An observational prospective study. SETTING: Free-living conditions. POPULATION: Four hundred and eight healthy pregnant Icelandic women. METHODS: Maternal smoking status, lifestyle factors and dietary habits were evaluated with questionnaires. Intake of foods and supplements was also estimated with a semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire for the previous 3 months. All questionnaires were filled out between 11 and 15 weeks and between 34 and 37 weeks of gestation. Smoking status in relation to optimal and/or excessive weight gain during pregnancy was represented with logistic regression controlling for potential confounding factors. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Maternal weight gain, smoking status, dietary intake and birthweight. RESULTS: Women who smoked throughout pregnancy were unlikely to gain optimal weight or more (OR 0.51, 95% CI 0.27-0.97), whereas smoking cessation in connection with pregnancy ('former smokers') doubled the risk of excessive weight gain (OR 2.03, 95% CI 1.24-3.35). The latter association was no longer significant after adjustment for dietary factors and other confounding factors. Former smokers ate the least amount of fruit and vegetables (fruit: 129 versus 180 and 144 g/day (median), P= 0.038; vegetables: 53 versus 76 and 72 g/day, P= 0.026 for former smokers, nonsmokers and smokers, respectively). Birthweight was lowest among infants born to smokers, but birthweight was similar for former smokers and nonsmokers (3583 +/- 491 g versus 3791 +/- 461 g and 3826 +/- 466 g, respectively; P= 0.003). CONCLUSIONS: Smoking cessation in early pregnancy or pre-pregnancy is not associated with low birthweight. It is, however, associated with excessive maternal weight gain and a low fruit and vegetable intake.
Description:
To access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links field
Additional Links:
http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi/full/10.1111/j.1471-0528.2006.01077.x

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorOlafsdottir, A S-
dc.contributor.authorSkuladottir, G V-
dc.contributor.authorThorsdottir, I-
dc.contributor.authorHauksson, A-
dc.contributor.authorSteingrimsdottir, L-
dc.date.accessioned2006-11-29T13:49:57Z-
dc.date.available2006-11-29T13:49:57Z-
dc.date.issued2006-11-01-
dc.date.submitted2006-11-29-
dc.identifier.citationBJOG 2006, 113(11):1296-302en
dc.identifier.issn1470-0328-
dc.identifier.pmid17004979-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1471-0528.2006.01077.x-
dc.identifier.otherNUR12-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/6265-
dc.descriptionTo access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links fielden
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: To investigate the interaction of smoking status and dietary intake during pregnancy and its relationship to maternal weight gain and birth size parameters. DESIGN: An observational prospective study. SETTING: Free-living conditions. POPULATION: Four hundred and eight healthy pregnant Icelandic women. METHODS: Maternal smoking status, lifestyle factors and dietary habits were evaluated with questionnaires. Intake of foods and supplements was also estimated with a semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire for the previous 3 months. All questionnaires were filled out between 11 and 15 weeks and between 34 and 37 weeks of gestation. Smoking status in relation to optimal and/or excessive weight gain during pregnancy was represented with logistic regression controlling for potential confounding factors. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Maternal weight gain, smoking status, dietary intake and birthweight. RESULTS: Women who smoked throughout pregnancy were unlikely to gain optimal weight or more (OR 0.51, 95% CI 0.27-0.97), whereas smoking cessation in connection with pregnancy ('former smokers') doubled the risk of excessive weight gain (OR 2.03, 95% CI 1.24-3.35). The latter association was no longer significant after adjustment for dietary factors and other confounding factors. Former smokers ate the least amount of fruit and vegetables (fruit: 129 versus 180 and 144 g/day (median), P= 0.038; vegetables: 53 versus 76 and 72 g/day, P= 0.026 for former smokers, nonsmokers and smokers, respectively). Birthweight was lowest among infants born to smokers, but birthweight was similar for former smokers and nonsmokers (3583 +/- 491 g versus 3791 +/- 461 g and 3826 +/- 466 g, respectively; P= 0.003). CONCLUSIONS: Smoking cessation in early pregnancy or pre-pregnancy is not associated with low birthweight. It is, however, associated with excessive maternal weight gain and a low fruit and vegetable intake.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBlackwell Puben
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi/full/10.1111/j.1471-0528.2006.01077.xen
dc.subject.meshBirth Weighten
dc.subject.meshDiet Recordsen
dc.subject.meshPregnancyen
dc.subject.meshSmokingen
dc.subject.meshWeight Gainen
dc.subject.meshIcelanden
dc.subject.meshPregnancy Outcomeen
dc.subject.meshDieten
dc.subject.meshEnergy Intakeen
dc.subject.meshFood Habitsen
dc.subject.meshWeight Gainen
dc.titleCombined effects of maternal smoking status and dietary intake related to weight gain and birth size parametersen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.format.digYES-

Related articles on PubMed

All Items in Hirsla are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.