2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2336/6273
Title:
Ocular powder: dry topical formulations of timolol are well tolerated in rabbits.
Authors:
Hardarson, Sveinn Hákon; Sigurdsson, Hákon Hrafn; Níelsdóttir, Gudrún Eva; Valgeirsson, Jón; Loftsson, Thorsteinn; Stefánsson, Einar
Citation:
J Ocul Pharmacol Ther 2006, 22(5):340-6
Issue Date:
1-Oct-2006
Abstract:
Purpose: Although eye drops are the most common form of ocular drugs, they have several limitations. Drug absorption into the eye is, in general, less than 5%, addition of preservatives is often necessary, and many drugs cannot be formulated as eye drops. Formulating ocular drugs as powder may solve these problems. The aim of this study was to investigate ocular irritation in rabbits following powder administration. Methods: Timolol maleate (TM) powder was administered to pigmented lop rabbits. Both pure TM powder and freeze-dried with PVP-polymer (2.4% of mass) were tested in 1.0- and 0.1-mg doses. Additionally, 4 rabbits received 0.1 mg of the pure powder 3 times a day for 8 d. Redness of the bulbar conjunctiva and the amount of discharge was rated from photographs (0-3 points, randomized and masked evaluation). The 8-d experiment additionally included examination with a slit lamp and examination of hematoxylin-eosin stained sections of eyes with light microscopy. Results: No serious or irreversible signs of irritation were noted. Doses of 1.0 mg were more irritating than 0.1-mg doses. There was no detectable difference in irritation between pure or freeze-dried powder. Slit-lamp examination, surface photographs and histology showed a negligible difference between drug and control eyes following the 8-d experiment. Conclusions: The results suggest that 0.1 mg of timolol powder does not irritate the eye and that testing topical timolol powder in humans is feasible.
Description:
To access Publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Link
Additional Links:
http://www.liebertonline.com/doi/pdf/10.1089/jop.2006.22.340?cookieSet=1

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHardarson, Sveinn Hákon-
dc.contributor.authorSigurdsson, Hákon Hrafn-
dc.contributor.authorNíelsdóttir, Gudrún Eva-
dc.contributor.authorValgeirsson, Jón-
dc.contributor.authorLoftsson, Thorsteinn-
dc.contributor.authorStefánsson, Einar-
dc.date.accessioned2006-11-29T16:08:40Z-
dc.date.available2006-11-29T16:08:40Z-
dc.date.issued2006-10-01-
dc.date.submitted2006-11-29-
dc.identifier.citationJ Ocul Pharmacol Ther 2006, 22(5):340-6en
dc.identifier.issn1080-7683-
dc.identifier.pmid17076628-
dc.identifier.doi10.1089/jop.2006.22.340-
dc.identifier.otherOPH12-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/6273-
dc.descriptionTo access Publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Linken
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Although eye drops are the most common form of ocular drugs, they have several limitations. Drug absorption into the eye is, in general, less than 5%, addition of preservatives is often necessary, and many drugs cannot be formulated as eye drops. Formulating ocular drugs as powder may solve these problems. The aim of this study was to investigate ocular irritation in rabbits following powder administration. Methods: Timolol maleate (TM) powder was administered to pigmented lop rabbits. Both pure TM powder and freeze-dried with PVP-polymer (2.4% of mass) were tested in 1.0- and 0.1-mg doses. Additionally, 4 rabbits received 0.1 mg of the pure powder 3 times a day for 8 d. Redness of the bulbar conjunctiva and the amount of discharge was rated from photographs (0-3 points, randomized and masked evaluation). The 8-d experiment additionally included examination with a slit lamp and examination of hematoxylin-eosin stained sections of eyes with light microscopy. Results: No serious or irreversible signs of irritation were noted. Doses of 1.0 mg were more irritating than 0.1-mg doses. There was no detectable difference in irritation between pure or freeze-dried powder. Slit-lamp examination, surface photographs and histology showed a negligible difference between drug and control eyes following the 8-d experiment. Conclusions: The results suggest that 0.1 mg of timolol powder does not irritate the eye and that testing topical timolol powder in humans is feasible.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherAssociation For Ocular Pharmacology And Therapeuticsen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.liebertonline.com/doi/pdf/10.1089/jop.2006.22.340?cookieSet=1en
dc.subject.meshOphthalmic Solutionsen
dc.subject.meshTimololen
dc.subject.meshEye Diseasesen
dc.titleOcular powder: dry topical formulations of timolol are well tolerated in rabbits.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.format.digYES-

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