Comparison of women's diet assessed by FFQs and 24-hour recalls with and without underreporters: associations with biomarkers

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2336/6340
Title:
Comparison of women's diet assessed by FFQs and 24-hour recalls with and without underreporters: associations with biomarkers
Authors:
Olafsdottir, Anna S; Thorsdottir, Inga; Gunnarsdottir, Ingibjörg; Thorgeirsdottir, Holmfridur; Steingrimsdottir, Laufey
Citation:
Ann. Nutr. Metab. 2006, 50(5):450-60
Issue Date:
1-Sep-2006
Abstract:
BACKGROUND/AIMS: Women's diet can be especially difficult to assess, as women tend to underreport their intakes more often than men and are more likely to do so if they think they are overweight or obese. The aim was to compare two methods to assess women's diet and how well they associate with biomarkers. The influence and frequency of underreporting was also investigated. METHODS: Diet of 53 women was assessed by two 24-hour recalls and a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ). Blood was analyzed for retinol, beta-carotene, vitamin C and serum ferritin, and 24-hour urine for nitrogen, potassium and sodium. Underreporting was evaluated with nitrogen excretion vs. intake, and energy intake vs. basal metabolic rate. RESULTS: Energy percent (E%) from macronutrients was similar from FFQ and 24-hour recalls, but total intake was higher from 24-hour recalls (9,516 +/- 2,080 vs. 8,183 +/- 2,893 kJ, p < 0.01). Intakes of vitamin C and potassium from both methods correlated with their respective biomarkers (r = 0.316-0.393). Underreporters had higher body mass index (BMI) than others (27.7 +/- 5.5 vs. 23.8 +/- 3.7 kg/m2, p < 0.05). They reported lower E% total fat (32 +/- 5 vs. 38 +/- 6 E%, p < 0.01) and higher E% carbohydrate (49 +/- 4 vs. 45 +/- 7 E%, p < 0.05). Correlation between intake and biomarkers increased after exclusion of underreporters. CONCLUSION: For women, FFQ and 24-hour recalls give similar E% and most nutrients correlate, but FFQ gives lower intake. Underreporters have higher BMI and diminish the correlation between calculated intake and biomarkers. This has to be considered when intake data are associated with weight management, disease and lifestyle factors.
Description:
To access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links field
Additional Links:
http://www.karger.com/DOI/10.1159/000094781

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorOlafsdottir, Anna S-
dc.contributor.authorThorsdottir, Inga-
dc.contributor.authorGunnarsdottir, Ingibjörg-
dc.contributor.authorThorgeirsdottir, Holmfridur-
dc.contributor.authorSteingrimsdottir, Laufey-
dc.date.accessioned2006-12-04T09:51:17Z-
dc.date.available2006-12-04T09:51:17Z-
dc.date.issued2006-09-01-
dc.date.submitted2006-12-04-
dc.identifier.citationAnn. Nutr. Metab. 2006, 50(5):450-60en
dc.identifier.issn0250-6807-
dc.identifier.pmid16877864-
dc.identifier.doi10.1159/000094781-
dc.identifier.otherNUR12-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/6340-
dc.descriptionTo access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links fielden
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND/AIMS: Women's diet can be especially difficult to assess, as women tend to underreport their intakes more often than men and are more likely to do so if they think they are overweight or obese. The aim was to compare two methods to assess women's diet and how well they associate with biomarkers. The influence and frequency of underreporting was also investigated. METHODS: Diet of 53 women was assessed by two 24-hour recalls and a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ). Blood was analyzed for retinol, beta-carotene, vitamin C and serum ferritin, and 24-hour urine for nitrogen, potassium and sodium. Underreporting was evaluated with nitrogen excretion vs. intake, and energy intake vs. basal metabolic rate. RESULTS: Energy percent (E%) from macronutrients was similar from FFQ and 24-hour recalls, but total intake was higher from 24-hour recalls (9,516 +/- 2,080 vs. 8,183 +/- 2,893 kJ, p < 0.01). Intakes of vitamin C and potassium from both methods correlated with their respective biomarkers (r = 0.316-0.393). Underreporters had higher body mass index (BMI) than others (27.7 +/- 5.5 vs. 23.8 +/- 3.7 kg/m2, p < 0.05). They reported lower E% total fat (32 +/- 5 vs. 38 +/- 6 E%, p < 0.01) and higher E% carbohydrate (49 +/- 4 vs. 45 +/- 7 E%, p < 0.05). Correlation between intake and biomarkers increased after exclusion of underreporters. CONCLUSION: For women, FFQ and 24-hour recalls give similar E% and most nutrients correlate, but FFQ gives lower intake. Underreporters have higher BMI and diminish the correlation between calculated intake and biomarkers. This has to be considered when intake data are associated with weight management, disease and lifestyle factors.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherKargeren
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.karger.com/DOI/10.1159/000094781en
dc.subject.meshBiological Markersen
dc.subject.meshNitrogenen
dc.subject.meshNutrition Assessmenten
dc.subject.meshOverweighten
dc.subject.meshWomen's Healthen
dc.subject.meshDieten
dc.subject.meshDiet Recordsen
dc.subject.meshDiet Surveysen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshIcelanden
dc.subject.meshAdulten
dc.subject.meshDietary Carbohydratesen
dc.subject.meshSelf Disclosureen
dc.subject.meshIcelanden
dc.subject.meshQuestionnairesen
dc.titleComparison of women's diet assessed by FFQs and 24-hour recalls with and without underreporters: associations with biomarkersen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalAnnals of nutrition & metabolismen
dc.format.digYES-

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