Fruit and vegetable intake: vitamin C and β-carotene intake and serum concentrations in six-year-old children and their parents

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2336/6355
Title:
Fruit and vegetable intake: vitamin C and β-carotene intake and serum concentrations in six-year-old children and their parents
Authors:
Thorsdottir, I; Gunnarsdottir, I; Ingolfsdottir, S.E; Palsson, G
Citation:
Scandinavian Journal of Food and Nutrition 2006, 50(2):71-76
Issue Date:
1-Jun-2006
Abstract:
Background: Intake of fruit and vegetables, which are important sources of antioxidant nutrients, has frequently been inversely related to the risk of chronic diseases. Objective: To investigate the serum concentration of vitamin C and β-carotene in relation to fruit and vegetable intake in 6-year-old children and their parents. Design: An observational study on families of healthy 6-year-old children in the Greater Reykjavik area. Serum vitamin C and β-carotene were analysed. Fruit and vegetable intake of children and their parents was assessed by 3 day weighed food records and by a food frequency questionnaire. Results: A positive correlation was seen in serum vitamin C concentration (r=0.454–0.570, p<0.005) and serum β-carotene concentration (r=0.385–0.497, p<0.02) between family members. The total intake of fruit, vegetables and fruit juice was 164±124g (mean±SD), 302±181g and 238±175g for children, mothers and fathers, respectively. Family members’ intake of fresh fruit, fruit juice and green leafy vegetables was positively related (r=0.227, p<0.02 and r=0.313, p<0.01 between children and their mother and father, respectively, and r=0.247, p<0.05 between parents). Conclusions: The relationship between children's and their parents’ fruit and vegetable intake is supported in the present study by an even stronger correlation of serum vitamin C and β-carotene between family members. Interventions aimed at increasing fruit and vegetable consumption by children should focus on the whole family.
Description:
To access Publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Link
Additional Links:
http://www.foodandnutritionresearch.net/index.php/fnr/article/view/1561

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorThorsdottir, I-
dc.contributor.authorGunnarsdottir, I-
dc.contributor.authorIngolfsdottir, S.E-
dc.contributor.authorPalsson, G-
dc.date.accessioned2006-12-05T12:37:14Z-
dc.date.available2006-12-05T12:37:14Z-
dc.date.issued2006-06-01-
dc.date.submitted2006-12-05-
dc.identifier.citationScandinavian Journal of Food and Nutrition 2006, 50(2):71-76en
dc.identifier.issn1748-2976-
dc.identifier.pmid###-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/17482970600774702-
dc.identifier.otherNUR12-
dc.identifier.otherPED12-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/6355-
dc.descriptionTo access Publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Linken
dc.description.abstractBackground: Intake of fruit and vegetables, which are important sources of antioxidant nutrients, has frequently been inversely related to the risk of chronic diseases. Objective: To investigate the serum concentration of vitamin C and β-carotene in relation to fruit and vegetable intake in 6-year-old children and their parents. Design: An observational study on families of healthy 6-year-old children in the Greater Reykjavik area. Serum vitamin C and β-carotene were analysed. Fruit and vegetable intake of children and their parents was assessed by 3 day weighed food records and by a food frequency questionnaire. Results: A positive correlation was seen in serum vitamin C concentration (r=0.454–0.570, p<0.005) and serum β-carotene concentration (r=0.385–0.497, p<0.02) between family members. The total intake of fruit, vegetables and fruit juice was 164±124g (mean±SD), 302±181g and 238±175g for children, mothers and fathers, respectively. Family members’ intake of fresh fruit, fruit juice and green leafy vegetables was positively related (r=0.227, p<0.02 and r=0.313, p<0.01 between children and their mother and father, respectively, and r=0.247, p<0.05 between parents). Conclusions: The relationship between children's and their parents’ fruit and vegetable intake is supported in the present study by an even stronger correlation of serum vitamin C and β-carotene between family members. Interventions aimed at increasing fruit and vegetable consumption by children should focus on the whole family.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor & Francisen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.foodandnutritionresearch.net/index.php/fnr/article/view/1561en
dc.subject.meshAntioxidantsen
dc.subject.meshIcelanden
dc.subject.meshChilden
dc.subject.meshFruiten
dc.subject.meshNutritionen
dc.subject.meshNutrition Surveysen
dc.subject.meshVegetablesen
dc.subject.meshParent-Child Relationsen
dc.subject.meshVitaminsen
dc.titleFruit and vegetable intake: vitamin C and β-carotene intake and serum concentrations in six-year-old children and their parentsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn1748-2984-
dc.format.digYES-
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