Anthropometric predictors of serum fasting insulin in 9- and 15-year-old children and adolescents

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2336/6445
Title:
Anthropometric predictors of serum fasting insulin in 9- and 15-year-old children and adolescents
Authors:
Thorsdottir, Inga; Gunnarsdottir, Ingibjorg; Palsson, Gestur I; Johannsson, Erlingur
Citation:
Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis. 2006, 16(4):263-71
Issue Date:
1-May-2006
Abstract:
BACKGROUND AND AIM: As the prevalence of overweight and obesity increases, the risk of insulin resistance rises. The aim was to study the association between anthropometric measurements and fasting insulin concentration in a population-based sample of 9- and 15-year-old children and adolescents. METHODS AND RESULTS: Subjects were randomly selected 9- and 15-year-old pupils (n=262) in a cross-sectional, population-based study. Weight and height, waist, hip and mid-arm-circumference and subcutaneous skinfolds were measured using standard procedures. Fasting insulin was measured. In general the mean anthropometric measurements increased across insulin quartiles. Higher fasting insulin concentration was seen in overweight children and adolescents than in those of normal weight (8.3+/-4.4 vs. 4.9+/-3.6 mmol/L and 11.0+/-4.4 vs. 9.0+/-4.2 mmol/L in 9- and 15 year-olds, respectively). The odds ratio for having insulin in the highest quartile (age and gender-specific) was, when compared with the lowest quartile, 7.2 (95% CI 3.0-17.2) for body mass index and 6.9 (2.8-16.7) for waist circumference. Other measurements of body fatness were less predictive. About 14-20% of children defined as being of normal weight had high fasting insulin values, i.e., were in the highest quartile of fasting insulin. CONCLUSIONS: Body fatness is positively related to fasting insulin concentration in 9- and 15-year-old children. A large number of normal-weight individuals with high fasting insulin concentration was observed, and these children could be at increased risk of weight gain, compared with normal-weight individuals with normal fasting insulin concentration.
Description:
To access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links field
Additional Links:
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.numecd.2005.09.003

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorThorsdottir, Inga-
dc.contributor.authorGunnarsdottir, Ingibjorg-
dc.contributor.authorPalsson, Gestur I-
dc.contributor.authorJohannsson, Erlingur-
dc.date.accessioned2006-12-07T09:46:20Z-
dc.date.available2006-12-07T09:46:20Z-
dc.date.issued2006-05-01-
dc.date.submitted2006-12-07-
dc.identifier.citationNutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis. 2006, 16(4):263-71en
dc.identifier.issn0939-4753-
dc.identifier.pmid16679218-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.numecd.2005.09.003-
dc.identifier.otherNUR12-
dc.identifier.otherPED12-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/6445-
dc.descriptionTo access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links fielden
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND AND AIM: As the prevalence of overweight and obesity increases, the risk of insulin resistance rises. The aim was to study the association between anthropometric measurements and fasting insulin concentration in a population-based sample of 9- and 15-year-old children and adolescents. METHODS AND RESULTS: Subjects were randomly selected 9- and 15-year-old pupils (n=262) in a cross-sectional, population-based study. Weight and height, waist, hip and mid-arm-circumference and subcutaneous skinfolds were measured using standard procedures. Fasting insulin was measured. In general the mean anthropometric measurements increased across insulin quartiles. Higher fasting insulin concentration was seen in overweight children and adolescents than in those of normal weight (8.3+/-4.4 vs. 4.9+/-3.6 mmol/L and 11.0+/-4.4 vs. 9.0+/-4.2 mmol/L in 9- and 15 year-olds, respectively). The odds ratio for having insulin in the highest quartile (age and gender-specific) was, when compared with the lowest quartile, 7.2 (95% CI 3.0-17.2) for body mass index and 6.9 (2.8-16.7) for waist circumference. Other measurements of body fatness were less predictive. About 14-20% of children defined as being of normal weight had high fasting insulin values, i.e., were in the highest quartile of fasting insulin. CONCLUSIONS: Body fatness is positively related to fasting insulin concentration in 9- and 15-year-old children. A large number of normal-weight individuals with high fasting insulin concentration was observed, and these children could be at increased risk of weight gain, compared with normal-weight individuals with normal fasting insulin concentration.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevieren
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.numecd.2005.09.003-
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten
dc.subject.meshAge Factorsen
dc.subject.meshAnthropometryen
dc.subject.meshBody Compositionen
dc.subject.meshBody Mass Indexen
dc.subject.meshChilden
dc.subject.meshCross-Sectional Studiesen
dc.subject.meshFastingen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshIceland/epidemiologyen
dc.subject.meshInsulinen
dc.subject.meshMaleen
dc.subject.meshObesityen
dc.subject.meshOdds Ratioen
dc.subject.meshPredictive Value of Testsen
dc.subject.meshResearch Support, Non-U.S. Gov'ten
dc.subject.meshSex Factorsen
dc.subject.meshWaist-Hip Ratioen
dc.titleAnthropometric predictors of serum fasting insulin in 9- and 15-year-old children and adolescentsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalNutrition, metabolism, and cardiovascular diseases : NMCDen
dc.format.digYES-

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