Polyunsaturated fatty acids in the diet and breast milk of lactating icelandic women with traditional fish and cod liver oil consumption

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2336/6481
Title:
Polyunsaturated fatty acids in the diet and breast milk of lactating icelandic women with traditional fish and cod liver oil consumption
Authors:
Olafsdottir, A S; Thorsdottir, I; Wagner, K H; Elmadfa, I
Citation:
Ann. Nutr. Metab. 2006, 50(3):270-6
Issue Date:
1-May-2006
Abstract:
BACKGROUND/AIMS: The proportion of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) in the diet and breast milk of lactating women with traditional fish and cod liver oil consumption was investigated under free-living conditions. METHODS: Dietary intake of 77 lactating women was investigated by 24-hour recalls and breast milk samples were taken at the same occasions. Maternal intake data was calculated and fatty acid pattern from breast milk samples analyzed with gas chromatography. RESULTS: Women using cod liver oil (n = 18) had a significantly higher total PUFA intake (14 +/- 10 vs. 9 +/- 7 g/day; 5.0 +/- 3.4 vs. 3.9 +/- 3.0 Energy%; p < 0.05) than women who did not use it (n = 59). In particular, mothers consuming cod liver oil had higher breast milk proportion of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 0.54 vs. 0.30%, p < 0.05). They also had higher breast milk proportions of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA; 0.16 vs.0.07%; p < 0.05) and docosapentaenoic acid (DPA; 0.22 vs. 0.17%; p < 0.05). CONCLUSION: The proportion of PUFA in the diet is significantly higher among women consuming cod liver oil. Its use also gives higher proportion of EPA,DPA and DHA in breast milk without decreasing other important fatty acids. As this may have an impact on the health and development of breast-fed infants in later life, regular maternal cod liver oil intake could be relevant for the infant as well as for the nutritional adequacy of the maternal diet.
Description:
To access Publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links field
Additional Links:
http://www.karger.com/DOI/10.1159/000091685

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorOlafsdottir, A S-
dc.contributor.authorThorsdottir, I-
dc.contributor.authorWagner, K H-
dc.contributor.authorElmadfa, I-
dc.date.accessioned2006-12-11T11:41:03Z-
dc.date.available2006-12-11T11:41:03Z-
dc.date.issued2006-05-01-
dc.date.submitted2006-12-11-
dc.identifier.citationAnn. Nutr. Metab. 2006, 50(3):270-6en
dc.identifier.issn0250-6807-
dc.identifier.pmid16508255-
dc.identifier.doi10.1159/000091685-
dc.identifier.otherNUR12-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/6481-
dc.descriptionTo access Publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links fielden
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND/AIMS: The proportion of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) in the diet and breast milk of lactating women with traditional fish and cod liver oil consumption was investigated under free-living conditions. METHODS: Dietary intake of 77 lactating women was investigated by 24-hour recalls and breast milk samples were taken at the same occasions. Maternal intake data was calculated and fatty acid pattern from breast milk samples analyzed with gas chromatography. RESULTS: Women using cod liver oil (n = 18) had a significantly higher total PUFA intake (14 +/- 10 vs. 9 +/- 7 g/day; 5.0 +/- 3.4 vs. 3.9 +/- 3.0 Energy%; p < 0.05) than women who did not use it (n = 59). In particular, mothers consuming cod liver oil had higher breast milk proportion of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 0.54 vs. 0.30%, p < 0.05). They also had higher breast milk proportions of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA; 0.16 vs.0.07%; p < 0.05) and docosapentaenoic acid (DPA; 0.22 vs. 0.17%; p < 0.05). CONCLUSION: The proportion of PUFA in the diet is significantly higher among women consuming cod liver oil. Its use also gives higher proportion of EPA,DPA and DHA in breast milk without decreasing other important fatty acids. As this may have an impact on the health and development of breast-fed infants in later life, regular maternal cod liver oil intake could be relevant for the infant as well as for the nutritional adequacy of the maternal diet.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherKargeren
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.karger.com/DOI/10.1159/000091685en
dc.subject.meshChromatography, Gasen
dc.subject.meshCod Liver Oilen
dc.subject.meshDieten
dc.subject.meshFatty Acids, Omega-3en
dc.subject.meshFatty Acids, Unsaturateden
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshIcelanden
dc.subject.meshInfanten
dc.subject.meshInfant Nutritionen
dc.subject.meshLactationen
dc.subject.meshMental Recallen
dc.subject.meshMilk, Humanen
dc.subject.meshResearch Support, Non-U.S. Gov'ten
dc.subject.meshSeafooden
dc.titlePolyunsaturated fatty acids in the diet and breast milk of lactating icelandic women with traditional fish and cod liver oil consumptionen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalAnnals of nutrition & metabolismen
dc.format.digYES-

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