Relationship between high consumption of marine fatty acids in early pregnancy and hypertensive disorders in pregnancy

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2336/6498
Title:
Relationship between high consumption of marine fatty acids in early pregnancy and hypertensive disorders in pregnancy
Authors:
Olafsdottir, A S; Skuladottir, G V; Thorsdottir, I; Hauksson, A; Thorgeirsdottir, H; Steingrimsdottir, L
Citation:
BJOG 2006, 113(3):301-9
Issue Date:
1-Mar-2006
Abstract:
OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether there is a relationship between maternal intake of cod-liver oil in early and late pregnancy and hypertensive disorders in pregnancy. DESIGN: An observational prospective study. SETTING: Free-living conditions in a community with traditional fish and cod-liver oil consumption. POPULATION: Four hundred and eighty-eight low-risk pregnant Icelandic women. METHODS: Maternal use of cod-liver oil, foods and other supplements was estimated with a semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire covering food intake together with lifestyle factors for the previous 3 months. Questionnaires were filled out twice, between 11 and 15 weeks of gestation and between 34 and 37 weeks of gestation. Supplements related to hypertensive disorders in pregnancy, i.e. gestational hypertension and pre-eclampsia, were presented, with logistic regression controlling for potential confounding. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Gestational hypertension, pre-eclampsia, cod-liver oil and multivitamins. RESULTS: The odds ratio for developing hypertensive disorders in pregnancy for women consuming liquid cod-liver oil was 4.7 (95% CI 1.8-12.6, P= 0.002), after adjusting for confounding factors. By dividing the amount of n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 LCPUFA) into centiles, the odds ratio for hypertensive disorders across groups for n-3 LCPUFA suggested a u-shaped curve (P = 0.008). Similar results were found for gestational hypertension alone. Further, the use of multivitamin supplements without vitamins A and D in late pregnancy doubled the odds of hypertensive disorders (OR 2.4, 95% CI 1.0-5.4, P= 0.044). CONCLUSIONS: Consumption of high doses of n-3 LCPUFA in early pregnancy, or other nutrients found in liquid cod-liver oil, may increase the risk of developing hypertensive disorders in pregnancy.
Description:
To access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links field
Additional Links:
http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi/full/10.1111/j.1471-0528.2006.00826.x

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorOlafsdottir, A S-
dc.contributor.authorSkuladottir, G V-
dc.contributor.authorThorsdottir, I-
dc.contributor.authorHauksson, A-
dc.contributor.authorThorgeirsdottir, H-
dc.contributor.authorSteingrimsdottir, L-
dc.date.accessioned2006-12-12T09:06:40Z-
dc.date.available2006-12-12T09:06:40Z-
dc.date.issued2006-03-01-
dc.date.submitted2006-12-12-
dc.identifier.citationBJOG 2006, 113(3):301-9en
dc.identifier.issn1470-0328-
dc.identifier.pmid16487202-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1471-0528.2006.00826.x-
dc.identifier.otherNUR12-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/6498-
dc.descriptionTo access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links fielden
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: To investigate whether there is a relationship between maternal intake of cod-liver oil in early and late pregnancy and hypertensive disorders in pregnancy. DESIGN: An observational prospective study. SETTING: Free-living conditions in a community with traditional fish and cod-liver oil consumption. POPULATION: Four hundred and eighty-eight low-risk pregnant Icelandic women. METHODS: Maternal use of cod-liver oil, foods and other supplements was estimated with a semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire covering food intake together with lifestyle factors for the previous 3 months. Questionnaires were filled out twice, between 11 and 15 weeks of gestation and between 34 and 37 weeks of gestation. Supplements related to hypertensive disorders in pregnancy, i.e. gestational hypertension and pre-eclampsia, were presented, with logistic regression controlling for potential confounding. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Gestational hypertension, pre-eclampsia, cod-liver oil and multivitamins. RESULTS: The odds ratio for developing hypertensive disorders in pregnancy for women consuming liquid cod-liver oil was 4.7 (95% CI 1.8-12.6, P= 0.002), after adjusting for confounding factors. By dividing the amount of n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 LCPUFA) into centiles, the odds ratio for hypertensive disorders across groups for n-3 LCPUFA suggested a u-shaped curve (P = 0.008). Similar results were found for gestational hypertension alone. Further, the use of multivitamin supplements without vitamins A and D in late pregnancy doubled the odds of hypertensive disorders (OR 2.4, 95% CI 1.0-5.4, P= 0.044). CONCLUSIONS: Consumption of high doses of n-3 LCPUFA in early pregnancy, or other nutrients found in liquid cod-liver oil, may increase the risk of developing hypertensive disorders in pregnancy.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBlackwell Pub.en
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi/full/10.1111/j.1471-0528.2006.00826.xen
dc.subject.meshAdulten
dc.subject.meshCod Liver Oilen
dc.subject.meshCohort Studiesen
dc.subject.meshDiet Surveysen
dc.subject.meshDietary Supplementsen
dc.subject.meshFatty Acids, Omega-3en
dc.subject.meshFatty Acids, Unsaturateden
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshFish Productsen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshHypertension, Pregnancy-Induceden
dc.subject.meshIceland/epidemiologyen
dc.subject.meshLife Styleen
dc.subject.meshOdds Ratioen
dc.subject.meshPre-Eclampsiaen
dc.subject.meshPregnancyen
dc.subject.meshPregnancy Trimester, Firsten
dc.subject.meshVitaminsen
dc.titleRelationship between high consumption of marine fatty acids in early pregnancy and hypertensive disorders in pregnancyen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalBJOG : an international journal of obstetrics and gynaecologyen
dc.format.digYES-

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