Prevalence and incidence of respiratory symptoms in relation to indoor dampness: the RHINE study

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2336/6533
Title:
Prevalence and incidence of respiratory symptoms in relation to indoor dampness: the RHINE study
Authors:
Gunnbjornsdottir, M I; Franklin, K A; Norbäck, D; Bjornsson, E; Gislason, D; Lindberg, E; Svanes, C; Omenaas, E; Norrman, E; Jõgi, R; Jensen, E J; Dahlman-Höglund, A; Janson, C
Citation:
Thorax 2006, 61(3):221-5
Issue Date:
1-Mar-2006
Abstract:
BACKGROUND: An association between indoor dampness and respiratory symptoms has been reported, but dampness as a risk factor for the onset or remission of respiratory symptoms and asthma is not well documented. METHOD: This follow up study included 16 190 subjects from Iceland, Norway, Sweden, Denmark, and Estonia who had participated in the European Community Respiratory Health Survey (ECRHS I). Eight years later the same subjects answered a postal questionnaire that included questions on respiratory symptoms and indicators of indoor dampness. RESULTS: Subjects living in damp housing (18%) had a significantly (p<0.001) higher prevalence of wheeze (19.1% v 26.0%), nocturnal breathlessness (4.4% v 8.4%), nocturnal cough (27.2% v 36.5%), productive cough (16.6% v 22.3%) and asthma (6.0% v 7.7%). These associations remained significant after adjusting for possible confounders. Indoor dampness was a risk factor for onset of respiratory symptoms but not for asthma onset in the longitudinal analysis (OR 1.13, 95% CI 0.92 to 1.40). Remission of nocturnal symptoms was less common in damp homes (OR 0.84, 95% CI 0.73 to 0.97). CONCLUSIONS: Subjects living in damp housing had a higher prevalence of respiratory symptoms and asthma. Onset of respiratory symptoms was more common and remission of nocturnal respiratory symptoms was less common in subjects living in damp housing.
Description:
To access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links field
Additional Links:
http://thorax.bmj.com/cgi/content/full/61/3/221

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorGunnbjornsdottir, M I-
dc.contributor.authorFranklin, K A-
dc.contributor.authorNorbäck, D-
dc.contributor.authorBjornsson, E-
dc.contributor.authorGislason, D-
dc.contributor.authorLindberg, E-
dc.contributor.authorSvanes, C-
dc.contributor.authorOmenaas, E-
dc.contributor.authorNorrman, E-
dc.contributor.authorJõgi, R-
dc.contributor.authorJensen, E J-
dc.contributor.authorDahlman-Höglund, A-
dc.contributor.authorJanson, C-
dc.date.accessioned2006-12-13T11:47:58Z-
dc.date.available2006-12-13T11:47:58Z-
dc.date.issued2006-03-01-
dc.date.submitted2006-12-13-
dc.identifier.citationThorax 2006, 61(3):221-5en
dc.identifier.issn0040-6376-
dc.identifier.pmid16396946-
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/thx.2005.057430-
dc.identifier.otherPAD12-
dc.identifier.otherAAI12-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/6533-
dc.descriptionTo access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links fielden
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: An association between indoor dampness and respiratory symptoms has been reported, but dampness as a risk factor for the onset or remission of respiratory symptoms and asthma is not well documented. METHOD: This follow up study included 16 190 subjects from Iceland, Norway, Sweden, Denmark, and Estonia who had participated in the European Community Respiratory Health Survey (ECRHS I). Eight years later the same subjects answered a postal questionnaire that included questions on respiratory symptoms and indicators of indoor dampness. RESULTS: Subjects living in damp housing (18%) had a significantly (p<0.001) higher prevalence of wheeze (19.1% v 26.0%), nocturnal breathlessness (4.4% v 8.4%), nocturnal cough (27.2% v 36.5%), productive cough (16.6% v 22.3%) and asthma (6.0% v 7.7%). These associations remained significant after adjusting for possible confounders. Indoor dampness was a risk factor for onset of respiratory symptoms but not for asthma onset in the longitudinal analysis (OR 1.13, 95% CI 0.92 to 1.40). Remission of nocturnal symptoms was less common in damp homes (OR 0.84, 95% CI 0.73 to 0.97). CONCLUSIONS: Subjects living in damp housing had a higher prevalence of respiratory symptoms and asthma. Onset of respiratory symptoms was more common and remission of nocturnal respiratory symptoms was less common in subjects living in damp housing.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBritish Medical Assn.en
dc.relation.urlhttp://thorax.bmj.com/cgi/content/full/61/3/221en
dc.subject.meshAdulten
dc.subject.meshAsthmaen
dc.subject.meshEuropeen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshHousingen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshIncidenceen
dc.subject.meshLongitudinal Studiesen
dc.subject.meshMaleen
dc.subject.meshOdds Ratioen
dc.subject.meshPrevalenceen
dc.subject.meshRespiration Disordersen
dc.subject.meshRisk Factorsen
dc.titlePrevalence and incidence of respiratory symptoms in relation to indoor dampness: the RHINE studyen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalThoraxen
dc.format.digYES-

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