Temporal and geographic stability of the serogroup-specific invasive disease potential of Streptococcus pneumoniae in children.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2336/68522
Title:
Temporal and geographic stability of the serogroup-specific invasive disease potential of Streptococcus pneumoniae in children.
Authors:
Brueggemann, Angela B; Peto, Timothy E A; Crook, Derrick W; Butler, Jay C; Kristinsson, Karl G; Spratt, Brian G
Citation:
J. Infect. Dis. 2004, 190(7):1203-11
Issue Date:
1-Oct-2004
Abstract:
A meta-analysis study design was used to analyze 7 data sets of invasive and carriage pneumococcal isolates recovered from children, to determine whether invasive disease potential differs for each serotype and, if so, whether it has changed over time or differs geographically. Serotype- and serogroup-specific odds ratios (ORs) were calculated for each study and as a pooled estimate, with use of serotype 14 as the reference group. ORs varied widely: the serotypes with the highest ORs (1, 5, and 7) were 60-fold more invasive than those with the lowest ORs (3, 6A, and 15). There was a significant inverse correlation between invasive disease and carriage prevalence for the serotypes that we considered, which implies that the most invasive serotypes and serogroups were the least commonly carried and that the most frequently carried were the least likely to cause invasive disease. There was no evidence of any temporal change or major geographical differences in serotype- or serogroup-specific invasive disease potential.
Description:
To access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links field
Additional Links:
http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/doi/abs/10.1086/423820

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBrueggemann, Angela B-
dc.contributor.authorPeto, Timothy E A-
dc.contributor.authorCrook, Derrick W-
dc.contributor.authorButler, Jay C-
dc.contributor.authorKristinsson, Karl G-
dc.contributor.authorSpratt, Brian G-
dc.date.accessioned2009-05-19T09:00:12Z-
dc.date.available2009-05-19T09:00:12Z-
dc.date.issued2004-10-01-
dc.date.submitted2009-05-19-
dc.identifier.citationJ. Infect. Dis. 2004, 190(7):1203-11en
dc.identifier.issn0022-1899-
dc.identifier.pmid15346329-
dc.identifier.doi10.1086/423820-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/68522-
dc.descriptionTo access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links fielden
dc.description.abstractA meta-analysis study design was used to analyze 7 data sets of invasive and carriage pneumococcal isolates recovered from children, to determine whether invasive disease potential differs for each serotype and, if so, whether it has changed over time or differs geographically. Serotype- and serogroup-specific odds ratios (ORs) were calculated for each study and as a pooled estimate, with use of serotype 14 as the reference group. ORs varied widely: the serotypes with the highest ORs (1, 5, and 7) were 60-fold more invasive than those with the lowest ORs (3, 6A, and 15). There was a significant inverse correlation between invasive disease and carriage prevalence for the serotypes that we considered, which implies that the most invasive serotypes and serogroups were the least commonly carried and that the most frequently carried were the least likely to cause invasive disease. There was no evidence of any temporal change or major geographical differences in serotype- or serogroup-specific invasive disease potential.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherUniversity of Chicago Pressen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.journals.uchicago.edu/doi/abs/10.1086/423820en
dc.subject.meshChilden
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshOdds Ratioen
dc.subject.meshPneumococcal Infectionsen
dc.subject.meshPneumococcal Vaccinesen
dc.subject.meshSerotypingen
dc.subject.meshStreptococcus pneumoniaeen
dc.titleTemporal and geographic stability of the serogroup-specific invasive disease potential of Streptococcus pneumoniae in children.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentAcademic Department of Microbiology and Infectious Disease, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom. angela.brueggemann@ndcls.ox.ac.uk.en
dc.identifier.journalJournal of infectious diseasesen
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