Contamination of cooked peeled shrimp (Pandalus borealis) by Listeria monocytogenes during processing at two processing plants

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2336/7167
Title:
Contamination of cooked peeled shrimp (Pandalus borealis) by Listeria monocytogenes during processing at two processing plants
Authors:
Gudmundsdóttir, Sigrún; Gudbjörnsdóttir, Birna; Einarsson, Hjörleifur; Kristinsson, Karl G; Kristjansson, Már
Citation:
J. Food Prot. 2006, 69(6):1304-11
Issue Date:
1-Jun-2006
Abstract:
Listeria spp. and Listeria monocytogenes contamination was evaluated in cooked peeled shrimp (final or semifinal product, 82 samples) and the shrimp-processing environment (two plants, 613 samples) in eight surveys conducted from 1998 through 2001. Listeria was detected in 12.5% (78) of the 695 samples (11.2% of the samples were positive for L. monocytogenes), but none of the samples of final product contained Listeria. One hundred seventy-two L. monocytogenes isolates were characterized by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Cleavage with macrorestriction enzymes AscI and ApaI yielded 14 different pulsotypes in the plants; two types were dominant, one in each plant. Sixty-three of the 106 isolates in plant A and 43 of the 66 isolates in plant B were of the dominant types. Certain strains, mainly of serotypes 1/2c and 4b and pulsotypes 1A and 2H, were persistent for long periods in both plants. Adaptation of good hygienic practices in the processing plants, including strict rules concerning traffic of staff and equipment, and existing hygienic requirements appeared to be effective in preventing contamination between areas within plants and in the final product. The persistence of Listeria strains in these two processing plants indicates the importance of detecting the places in the processing environment (e.g., transporters, equipment, floors, and drains) where L. monocytogenes can survive so that cleaning and disinfection efforts can be directed to such niches.
Description:
To access Publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links field
Additional Links:
http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/iafp/jfp/2006/00000069/00000006/art00010;jsessionid=2wtjoekfcvvet.alice

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorGudmundsdóttir, Sigrún-
dc.contributor.authorGudbjörnsdóttir, Birna-
dc.contributor.authorEinarsson, Hjörleifur-
dc.contributor.authorKristinsson, Karl G-
dc.contributor.authorKristjansson, Már-
dc.date.accessioned2007-01-10T11:20:19Z-
dc.date.available2007-01-10T11:20:19Z-
dc.date.issued2006-06-01-
dc.date.submitted2007-01-10-
dc.identifier.citationJ. Food Prot. 2006, 69(6):1304-11en
dc.identifier.issn0362-028X-
dc.identifier.pmid16786850-
dc.identifier.otherBAC12-
dc.identifier.otherTMD12-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/7167-
dc.descriptionTo access Publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links fielden
dc.description.abstractListeria spp. and Listeria monocytogenes contamination was evaluated in cooked peeled shrimp (final or semifinal product, 82 samples) and the shrimp-processing environment (two plants, 613 samples) in eight surveys conducted from 1998 through 2001. Listeria was detected in 12.5% (78) of the 695 samples (11.2% of the samples were positive for L. monocytogenes), but none of the samples of final product contained Listeria. One hundred seventy-two L. monocytogenes isolates were characterized by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Cleavage with macrorestriction enzymes AscI and ApaI yielded 14 different pulsotypes in the plants; two types were dominant, one in each plant. Sixty-three of the 106 isolates in plant A and 43 of the 66 isolates in plant B were of the dominant types. Certain strains, mainly of serotypes 1/2c and 4b and pulsotypes 1A and 2H, were persistent for long periods in both plants. Adaptation of good hygienic practices in the processing plants, including strict rules concerning traffic of staff and equipment, and existing hygienic requirements appeared to be effective in preventing contamination between areas within plants and in the final product. The persistence of Listeria strains in these two processing plants indicates the importance of detecting the places in the processing environment (e.g., transporters, equipment, floors, and drains) where L. monocytogenes can survive so that cleaning and disinfection efforts can be directed to such niches.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherInternational Association for Food Protectionen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/iafp/jfp/2006/00000069/00000006/art00010;jsessionid=2wtjoekfcvvet.aliceen
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen
dc.subject.meshListeriaen
dc.subject.meshElectrophoresis, Gel, Pulsed-Fielden
dc.subject.meshConsumer Product Safetyen
dc.subject.meshEquipment Contaminationen
dc.subject.meshFood Contaminationen
dc.subject.meshFood Handlingen
dc.subject.meshFood-Processing Industryen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshHygieneen
dc.subject.meshListeria monocytogenesen
dc.subject.meshPandalidaeen
dc.subject.meshSerotypingen
dc.subject.meshShellfishen
dc.titleContamination of cooked peeled shrimp (Pandalus borealis) by Listeria monocytogenes during processing at two processing plantsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.format.digYES-

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