Body mass index, weight gain, and other determinants of lung function decline in adult asthma

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2336/73643
Title:
Body mass index, weight gain, and other determinants of lung function decline in adult asthma
Authors:
Marcon, Alessandro; Corsico, Angelo; Cazzoletti, Lucia; Bugiani, Massimiliano; Accordini, Simone; Almar, Enrique; Cerveri, Isa; Gislason, David; Gulsvik, Amund; Janson, Christer; Jarvis, Deborah; Martínez-Moratalla, Jesús; Pin, Isabelle; de Marco, Roberto
Citation:
J. Allergy Clin. Immunol. 2009, 123(5):1069-74.e4
Issue Date:
1-May-2009
Abstract:
BACKGROUND: Little is known about factors associated with lung function decline in asthma. OBJECTIVE: To identify the determinants of FEV(1) decline in adults with asthma with and without airflow obstruction at baseline. METHODS: An international cohort of 638 subjects with asthma (20-44 years old) was identified in the European Community Respiratory Health Survey (1991-1993) and followed up from 1998 to 2002. Spirometry was performed on both occasions. FEV(1) decline was related to potential determinants evaluated at baseline and during the follow-up by random intercept linear regression models. The analyses were stratified by the presence of airflow obstruction (FEV(1)/forced vital capacity < 0.70) at baseline. RESULTS: In the group of individuals without airflow obstruction (n = 544), a faster FEV(1) decline was observed for subjects with intermediate body mass index (BMI) than for lean and obese subjects. FEV(1) decline was associated with weight gain independently of baseline BMI, and this association was stronger in men (20; 95% CI, 10-30, mL/y/kg gained) than in women (6; 95% CI, 1-11, mL/y). In the group of individuals with airflow obstruction (n = 94), the absence of allergen sensitization and a low BMI at baseline were associated with a faster FEV(1) decline, whereas weight gain was not associated with decline. CONCLUSIONS: The detrimental effect of weight gain on FEV(1) decline is particularly relevant in subjects with asthma who still do not have an established airflow obstruction. Our findings support the importance of weight management in asthma and recommend weight loss in overweight or obese individuals with asthma.
Description:
To access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links field
Additional Links:
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaci.2009.01.040

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMarcon, Alessandro-
dc.contributor.authorCorsico, Angelo-
dc.contributor.authorCazzoletti, Lucia-
dc.contributor.authorBugiani, Massimiliano-
dc.contributor.authorAccordini, Simone-
dc.contributor.authorAlmar, Enrique-
dc.contributor.authorCerveri, Isa-
dc.contributor.authorGislason, David-
dc.contributor.authorGulsvik, Amund-
dc.contributor.authorJanson, Christer-
dc.contributor.authorJarvis, Deborah-
dc.contributor.authorMartínez-Moratalla, Jesús-
dc.contributor.authorPin, Isabelle-
dc.contributor.authorde Marco, Roberto-
dc.date.accessioned2009-07-14T11:54:46Z-
dc.date.available2009-07-14T11:54:46Z-
dc.date.issued2009-05-01-
dc.date.submitted2009-07-14-
dc.identifier.citationJ. Allergy Clin. Immunol. 2009, 123(5):1069-74.e4en
dc.identifier.issn1097-6825-
dc.identifier.pmid19321196-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jaci.2009.01.040-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/73643-
dc.descriptionTo access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links fielden
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Little is known about factors associated with lung function decline in asthma. OBJECTIVE: To identify the determinants of FEV(1) decline in adults with asthma with and without airflow obstruction at baseline. METHODS: An international cohort of 638 subjects with asthma (20-44 years old) was identified in the European Community Respiratory Health Survey (1991-1993) and followed up from 1998 to 2002. Spirometry was performed on both occasions. FEV(1) decline was related to potential determinants evaluated at baseline and during the follow-up by random intercept linear regression models. The analyses were stratified by the presence of airflow obstruction (FEV(1)/forced vital capacity < 0.70) at baseline. RESULTS: In the group of individuals without airflow obstruction (n = 544), a faster FEV(1) decline was observed for subjects with intermediate body mass index (BMI) than for lean and obese subjects. FEV(1) decline was associated with weight gain independently of baseline BMI, and this association was stronger in men (20; 95% CI, 10-30, mL/y/kg gained) than in women (6; 95% CI, 1-11, mL/y). In the group of individuals with airflow obstruction (n = 94), the absence of allergen sensitization and a low BMI at baseline were associated with a faster FEV(1) decline, whereas weight gain was not associated with decline. CONCLUSIONS: The detrimental effect of weight gain on FEV(1) decline is particularly relevant in subjects with asthma who still do not have an established airflow obstruction. Our findings support the importance of weight management in asthma and recommend weight loss in overweight or obese individuals with asthma.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherMosbyen
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaci.2009.01.040en
dc.subject.meshAdulten
dc.subject.meshAsthmaen
dc.subject.meshBody Mass Indexen
dc.subject.meshEuropeen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshFollow-Up Studiesen
dc.subject.meshForced Expiratory Volumeen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshLungen
dc.subject.meshMaleen
dc.subject.meshSmokingen
dc.subject.meshSpirometryen
dc.subject.meshWeight Gainen
dc.titleBody mass index, weight gain, and other determinants of lung function decline in adult asthmaen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Medicine and Public Health, Unit of Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, University of Verona, Verona, Italy. alessandro.marcon@univr.iten
dc.identifier.journalJournal of allergy and clinical immunologyen

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