Decrease in adiponectin levels correlates to growth response in growth hormone-treated children

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2336/78077
Title:
Decrease in adiponectin levels correlates to growth response in growth hormone-treated children
Authors:
Andersson, B; Carlsson, L M S; Carlsson, B; Albertsson-Wikland, K; Bjarnason, R
Citation:
Horm. Res. 2009, 71(4):213-8
Issue Date:
1-Apr-2009
Abstract:
BACKGROUND/AIMS: Adiponectin is secreted by adipose tissue and circulates in human plasma at high levels. Decreased adiponectin levels are associated with insulin resistance and obesity. The aim of this study was to investigate whether changes in serum adiponectin levels are related to the growth response, insulin levels and insulin resistance during growth hormone (GH) treatment. METHODS: The study included 94 short prepubertal children (19 girls and 75 boys). The mean age at the start of daily GH injections was 9.04 +/- 2.38 years. Adiponectin levels in serum were measured using an ELISA. Results: At baseline, adiponectin correlated with the first-year growth response (r = 0.26, p = 0.012). Adiponectin decreased significantly after 1 week, 3 months and 1 year from 14.5 +/- 5.71 to 13.1 +/- 5.22 (p < 0.0001), 10.3 +/- 4.82 (p < 0.0001) and 12.5 +/- 5.34 microg/ml (p < 0.0001), respectively. There were significant correlations between the first-year growth response and the decrease in adiponectin levels after 3 months and 1 year (r = -0.38, p < 0.0001 and r = -0.47, p < 0.0001, respectively). No correlations between adiponectin, insulin and the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance were seen. CONCLUSIONS: GH treatment in prepubertal children decreases serum adiponectin levels, and the decrease is correlated to the growth response. No correlations between adiponectin and insulin levels or insulin resistance were found.
Description:
To access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links field
Additional Links:
http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000201110

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorAndersson, B-
dc.contributor.authorCarlsson, L M S-
dc.contributor.authorCarlsson, B-
dc.contributor.authorAlbertsson-Wikland, K-
dc.contributor.authorBjarnason, R-
dc.date.accessioned2009-08-20T15:38:25Z-
dc.date.available2009-08-20T15:38:25Z-
dc.date.issued2009-04-01-
dc.date.submitted2009-08-20-
dc.identifier.citationHorm. Res. 2009, 71(4):213-8en
dc.identifier.issn1423-0046-
dc.identifier.pmid19258713-
dc.identifier.doi10.1159/000201110-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/78077-
dc.descriptionTo access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links fielden
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND/AIMS: Adiponectin is secreted by adipose tissue and circulates in human plasma at high levels. Decreased adiponectin levels are associated with insulin resistance and obesity. The aim of this study was to investigate whether changes in serum adiponectin levels are related to the growth response, insulin levels and insulin resistance during growth hormone (GH) treatment. METHODS: The study included 94 short prepubertal children (19 girls and 75 boys). The mean age at the start of daily GH injections was 9.04 +/- 2.38 years. Adiponectin levels in serum were measured using an ELISA. Results: At baseline, adiponectin correlated with the first-year growth response (r = 0.26, p = 0.012). Adiponectin decreased significantly after 1 week, 3 months and 1 year from 14.5 +/- 5.71 to 13.1 +/- 5.22 (p < 0.0001), 10.3 +/- 4.82 (p < 0.0001) and 12.5 +/- 5.34 microg/ml (p < 0.0001), respectively. There were significant correlations between the first-year growth response and the decrease in adiponectin levels after 3 months and 1 year (r = -0.38, p < 0.0001 and r = -0.47, p < 0.0001, respectively). No correlations between adiponectin, insulin and the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance were seen. CONCLUSIONS: GH treatment in prepubertal children decreases serum adiponectin levels, and the decrease is correlated to the growth response. No correlations between adiponectin and insulin levels or insulin resistance were found.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherKargeren
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000201110en
dc.subject.meshAdiponectinen
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten
dc.subject.meshChilden
dc.subject.meshChild Developmenten
dc.subject.meshChild, Preschoolen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshHuman Growth Hormoneen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshInsulinen
dc.subject.meshInsulin Resistanceen
dc.subject.meshMaleen
dc.titleDecrease in adiponectin levels correlates to growth response in growth hormone-treated childrenen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Pediatrics, Goteborg Pediatric Growth Research Center, The Institute of Clinical Sciences, Göteborg, Sweden.en
dc.identifier.journalHormone researchen

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