2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2336/82834
Title:
Epidemiology of the optic nerve grey crescent in the Reykjavik Eye Study.
Authors:
Jonsson, O; Damji, K F; Jonasson, F; Arnarsson, A; Eysteinsson, T; Sasaki, H; Sasaki, K
Citation:
Br J Ophthalmol. 2005, 89(1):36-9
Issue Date:
1-Jan-2005
Abstract:
AIM: To establish the epidemiology of the grey crescent in a white population within the age range most susceptible to glaucoma. METHODS: Bruce Shields was first to use this term to describe a localised, physiological pigmentation of the optic nerve neuroretinal rim tissue that is distinct from peripapillary pigmentation. An experienced glaucomatologist (KFD) evaluated stereofundus photographs of the participants of the Reykjavik Eye Study (RES)-a random sample from the national population census including people 50 years and older. 1012 right eyes could be evaluated for grey crescent. RESULTS: The prevalence of grey crescent in the right eyes was 22.0% (95% CI 10 to 25). It was more commonly found in women (27.0%: 95% CI 23 to 30) than in men (17.0%: 95% CI 14 to 21), and was most often located temporally (36.9%), 360 degrees (15.9%), or nasally (15.4%). The spherical equivalent was +1.30 dioptres (D) for those with and +0.80 D for those without grey crescent (p = 0.002), respectively. Vertical optic disc diameters were 0.203 v 0.195 units (p<0.001). There was no difference in the prevalence of grey crescent in glaucomatous or non-glaucomatous eyes (OR = 1.05, 95% CI 0.49 to 2.26). The prevalence of a grey crescent was inversely related to the prevalence of peripapillary atrophy (p = 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: The grey crescent needs to be recognised as a physiological variant in order to avoid falsely labelling eyes as having glaucomatous optic nerve damage.
Description:
To access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links field
Additional Links:
http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bjo.2004.044305

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorJonsson, Oen
dc.contributor.authorDamji, K Fen
dc.contributor.authorJonasson, Fen
dc.contributor.authorArnarsson, Aen
dc.contributor.authorEysteinsson, Ten
dc.contributor.authorSasaki, Hen
dc.contributor.authorSasaki, Ken
dc.date.accessioned2009-09-28T09:58:04Z-
dc.date.available2009-09-28T09:58:04Z-
dc.date.issued2005-01-01-
dc.date.submitted2009-09-28-
dc.identifier.citationBr J Ophthalmol. 2005, 89(1):36-9en
dc.identifier.issn0007-1161-
dc.identifier.pmid15615743-
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/bjo.2004.044305-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/82834-
dc.descriptionTo access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links fielden
dc.description.abstractAIM: To establish the epidemiology of the grey crescent in a white population within the age range most susceptible to glaucoma. METHODS: Bruce Shields was first to use this term to describe a localised, physiological pigmentation of the optic nerve neuroretinal rim tissue that is distinct from peripapillary pigmentation. An experienced glaucomatologist (KFD) evaluated stereofundus photographs of the participants of the Reykjavik Eye Study (RES)-a random sample from the national population census including people 50 years and older. 1012 right eyes could be evaluated for grey crescent. RESULTS: The prevalence of grey crescent in the right eyes was 22.0% (95% CI 10 to 25). It was more commonly found in women (27.0%: 95% CI 23 to 30) than in men (17.0%: 95% CI 14 to 21), and was most often located temporally (36.9%), 360 degrees (15.9%), or nasally (15.4%). The spherical equivalent was +1.30 dioptres (D) for those with and +0.80 D for those without grey crescent (p = 0.002), respectively. Vertical optic disc diameters were 0.203 v 0.195 units (p<0.001). There was no difference in the prevalence of grey crescent in glaucomatous or non-glaucomatous eyes (OR = 1.05, 95% CI 0.49 to 2.26). The prevalence of a grey crescent was inversely related to the prevalence of peripapillary atrophy (p = 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: The grey crescent needs to be recognised as a physiological variant in order to avoid falsely labelling eyes as having glaucomatous optic nerve damage.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBritish Medical Associationen
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bjo.2004.044305en
dc.subject.meshAgeden
dc.subject.meshAged, 80 and overen
dc.subject.meshAtrophyen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshFluorescein Angiographyen
dc.subject.meshGlaucomaen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshIcelanden
dc.subject.meshMaleen
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden
dc.subject.meshOptic Disken
dc.subject.meshOptic Nerve Diseasesen
dc.subject.meshPigmentation Disordersen
dc.subject.meshPrevalenceen
dc.subject.meshSex Distributionen
dc.titleEpidemiology of the optic nerve grey crescent in the Reykjavik Eye Study.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Ottawa Eye Institute, 501 Smyth Road, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1H 8L6.en
dc.identifier.journalBritish journal of ophthalmologyen

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