Optimum expression of adult lung function based on all-cause mortality: Results from the Reykjavik study

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2336/8328
Title:
Optimum expression of adult lung function based on all-cause mortality: Results from the Reykjavik study
Authors:
Chinn, S; Gislason, T; Aspelund, T; Gudnason, V
Citation:
Respir Med 2007, 101(3):601-9
Issue Date:
1-Mar-2007
Abstract:
A variety of reference curves are used to derive predicted values for adult lung function, even within ethnically similar populations. Alternatives to percentage predicted value are sometimes used to allow for height in research. Strength of association with total mortality can be used to choose the optimal expression, between forced expiratory volume in 1s (FEV(1)) divided by height(2), FEV(1)/height(3), FEV(1)% predicted and difference from predicted. Data from the Reykjavik Study cohort, 1976-2002, included 5544 men and 8062 women randomly selected from the population. Total mortality was analysed by Cox proportional hazards regression in relation to each height-adjusted measure, allowing for age group, period of recruitment and body mass index, and smoking before or at baseline. FEV(1)/height(2) and FEV(1)/height(3) had stronger associations with mortality than FEV(1)% predicted and difference from predicted in men and in women. There were similar findings for forced vital capacity (FVC) in non-smokers and in women. FEV(1)/height(2) was slightly better predictive than FEV(1)/height(3) in men, but distributions of FEV(1)/height(3) in men and women were closer than those of FEV(1)/height(2). Clinical practise and epidemiological research would benefit from agreement on how to adjust lung function for height. Replication of these analyses in other cohort studies would inform the choice between FEV(1)/height(2) and FEV(1)/height(3).
Description:
To access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links field
Additional Links:
http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0954-6111(06)00317-9

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorChinn, S-
dc.contributor.authorGislason, T-
dc.contributor.authorAspelund, T-
dc.contributor.authorGudnason, V-
dc.date.accessioned2007-02-12T11:38:09Z-
dc.date.available2007-02-12T11:38:09Z-
dc.date.issued2007-03-01-
dc.date.submitted2007-02-12T11:38:09Z-
dc.identifier.citationRespir Med 2007, 101(3):601-9en
dc.identifier.issn0954-6111-
dc.identifier.pmid16889951-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.rmed.2006.06.009-
dc.identifier.otherPAD12-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/8328-
dc.descriptionTo access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links fielden
dc.description.abstractA variety of reference curves are used to derive predicted values for adult lung function, even within ethnically similar populations. Alternatives to percentage predicted value are sometimes used to allow for height in research. Strength of association with total mortality can be used to choose the optimal expression, between forced expiratory volume in 1s (FEV(1)) divided by height(2), FEV(1)/height(3), FEV(1)% predicted and difference from predicted. Data from the Reykjavik Study cohort, 1976-2002, included 5544 men and 8062 women randomly selected from the population. Total mortality was analysed by Cox proportional hazards regression in relation to each height-adjusted measure, allowing for age group, period of recruitment and body mass index, and smoking before or at baseline. FEV(1)/height(2) and FEV(1)/height(3) had stronger associations with mortality than FEV(1)% predicted and difference from predicted in men and in women. There were similar findings for forced vital capacity (FVC) in non-smokers and in women. FEV(1)/height(2) was slightly better predictive than FEV(1)/height(3) in men, but distributions of FEV(1)/height(3) in men and women were closer than those of FEV(1)/height(2). Clinical practise and epidemiological research would benefit from agreement on how to adjust lung function for height. Replication of these analyses in other cohort studies would inform the choice between FEV(1)/height(2) and FEV(1)/height(3).en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherW.B. Saundersen
dc.relation.urlhttp://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0954-6111(06)00317-9en
dc.subject.meshBody Heighten
dc.subject.meshBody Mass Indexen
dc.subject.meshCardiovascular Diseasesen
dc.subject.meshCause of Deathen
dc.subject.meshForced Expiratory Volumeen
dc.subject.meshIceland/epidemiologyen
dc.subject.meshLungen
dc.subject.meshPredictive Value of Testsen
dc.subject.meshProportional Hazards Modelsen
dc.subject.meshSmokingen
dc.titleOptimum expression of adult lung function based on all-cause mortality: Results from the Reykjavik studyen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalRespiratory medicineen
dc.format.digYES-

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