2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2336/86775
Title:
Orofacial granulomatosis: review on aetiology and pathogenesis.
Authors:
Tilakaratne, W M; Freysdottir, J; Fortune, F
Citation:
Oral Pathol. Med. 2008, 37(4):191-5
Issue Date:
1-Apr-2008
Abstract:
Orofacial granulomatosis (OFG) is considered as an uncommon disease and nomenclature of the disease was subjected to debate for a long time. Although various aetiological agents such as food substances, food additives, dental materials and various microbiological agents have been implicated in the disease process its precise pathogenesis is yet to be elucidated. Delayed type of hypersensitivity reaction appears to play a significant role, although the exact antigen inducing the immunological reaction varies in individual patients. However, evidence for the role of genetic predisposition to the disease is sparse. The underlying immunological mechanism appears to show some similarities between OFG and Crohn's disease, emphasizing the need for more comparative studies of the two entities. Therefore, we propose the term idiopathic OFG as a better term for those cases restricted to oral region without any identifiable known granulomatous disease and the diagnosis should not be changed until the patient develops systemic manifestations of a specific granulomatous condition. This review attempts to discuss the role of different aetiological agents and certain aspects of pathogenesis of OFG.
Description:
To access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links field
Additional Links:
http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/119406826/abstract

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorTilakaratne, W Men
dc.contributor.authorFreysdottir, Jen
dc.contributor.authorFortune, Fen
dc.date.accessioned2009-11-24T11:40:59Z-
dc.date.available2009-11-24T11:40:59Z-
dc.date.issued2008-04-01-
dc.date.submitted2009-11-24-
dc.identifier.citationOral Pathol. Med. 2008, 37(4):191-5en
dc.identifier.issn1600-0714-
dc.identifier.pmid18321344-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1600-0714.2007.00591.x-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/86775-
dc.descriptionTo access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links fielden
dc.description.abstractOrofacial granulomatosis (OFG) is considered as an uncommon disease and nomenclature of the disease was subjected to debate for a long time. Although various aetiological agents such as food substances, food additives, dental materials and various microbiological agents have been implicated in the disease process its precise pathogenesis is yet to be elucidated. Delayed type of hypersensitivity reaction appears to play a significant role, although the exact antigen inducing the immunological reaction varies in individual patients. However, evidence for the role of genetic predisposition to the disease is sparse. The underlying immunological mechanism appears to show some similarities between OFG and Crohn's disease, emphasizing the need for more comparative studies of the two entities. Therefore, we propose the term idiopathic OFG as a better term for those cases restricted to oral region without any identifiable known granulomatous disease and the diagnosis should not be changed until the patient develops systemic manifestations of a specific granulomatous condition. This review attempts to discuss the role of different aetiological agents and certain aspects of pathogenesis of OFG.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherMunksgaarden
dc.relation.urlhttp://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/119406826/abstracten
dc.subject.meshCrohn Diseaseen
dc.subject.meshDental Alloysen
dc.subject.meshFood Hypersensitivityen
dc.subject.meshGenetic Predisposition to Diseaseen
dc.subject.meshGranulomatosis, Orofacialen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshImmunity, Cellularen
dc.subject.meshMouth Mucosaen
dc.subject.meshTerminology as Topicen
dc.titleOrofacial granulomatosis: review on aetiology and pathogenesis.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentCentre for Research in Clinical and Diagnostic Oral Sciences, The School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary, University of London, London, UK. wmtilak@pdn.ac.uken
dc.identifier.journalJournal of oral pathology & medicine : official publication of the International Association of Oral Pathologists and the American Academy of Oral Pathologyen

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