C-reactive protein in migraine sufferers similar to that of non-migraineurs: the Reykjavik Study

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2336/88776
Title:
C-reactive protein in migraine sufferers similar to that of non-migraineurs: the Reykjavik Study
Authors:
Gudmundsson, L S; Aspelund, T; Scher, A I; Thorgeirsson, G; Johannsson, M; Launer, L J; Gudnason, V
Citation:
Cephalalgia 2009, 29(12):1301-10
Issue Date:
1-Dec-2009
Abstract:
C-reactive protein (CRP), a marker of inflammation, has been associated with cardiovascular disease. Risk of cardiovascular disease is increased in migraineurs with aura. Results from a clinical report, case-control and a cohort study suggest that CRP is elevated in migraineurs compared with non-migraineurs. We examined the proposed association in a case-control study nested within two large population-based studies. The relationship between migraine and CRP (high-sensitivity CRP) was studied in 5906 men and women aged 55.0 +/- 8.5 years in the Reykjavik Study and 1345 men and women aged 27.7 +/- 5.5 years from the Reykjavik Study for the Young. A modified version of the International Headache Society's criteria was used to categorize people into migraineurs (two or more symptoms) or non-migraineurs. Migraineurs with visual or sensory symptoms were further defined as having migraine with aura (MA) or without aura (MO). Multivariable-adjusted CRP levels were similar in migraineurs and non-migraineurs for men (0.83 vs. 0.79 mg/l, P = 0.44) and for women (0.87 vs. 0.87 mg/l, P = 0.90). When further stratified by migraine aura and age, no differences were found between non-migraineurs, MO and MA among men. In women, CRP levels were borderline higher in those with MO compared with non-migraineurs and those with MA (1.01 mg/l vs. 0.81 and 0.75 mg/l, P = 0.08 and P = 0.08) in age group 19-34 years, but significantly lower in age group 60-81 years (0.52 mg/l vs. 1.07 and 1.01 mg/l, P = 0.007 and P = 0.03). CRP levels were not increased among migraine sufferers compared with non-migraineurs. Older women migraineurs without aura had lower CRP values than non-migraineurs and migraineurs with aura.
Description:
To access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links field
Additional Links:
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-2982.2009.01865.x

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorGudmundsson, L Sen
dc.contributor.authorAspelund, Ten
dc.contributor.authorScher, A Ien
dc.contributor.authorThorgeirsson, Gen
dc.contributor.authorJohannsson, Men
dc.contributor.authorLauner, L Jen
dc.contributor.authorGudnason, Ven
dc.date.accessioned2010-01-05T15:49:18Z-
dc.date.accessioned2010-01-05T15:50:27Z-
dc.date.available2010-01-05T15:49:18Z-
dc.date.available2010-01-05T15:50:27Z-
dc.date.issued2009-12-01-
dc.date.submitted2010-01-05-
dc.identifier.citationCephalalgia 2009, 29(12):1301-10en
dc.identifier.issn1468-2982-
dc.identifier.pmid19438929-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1468-2982.2009.01865.x-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/88775-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/88776-
dc.descriptionTo access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links fielden
dc.description.abstractC-reactive protein (CRP), a marker of inflammation, has been associated with cardiovascular disease. Risk of cardiovascular disease is increased in migraineurs with aura. Results from a clinical report, case-control and a cohort study suggest that CRP is elevated in migraineurs compared with non-migraineurs. We examined the proposed association in a case-control study nested within two large population-based studies. The relationship between migraine and CRP (high-sensitivity CRP) was studied in 5906 men and women aged 55.0 +/- 8.5 years in the Reykjavik Study and 1345 men and women aged 27.7 +/- 5.5 years from the Reykjavik Study for the Young. A modified version of the International Headache Society's criteria was used to categorize people into migraineurs (two or more symptoms) or non-migraineurs. Migraineurs with visual or sensory symptoms were further defined as having migraine with aura (MA) or without aura (MO). Multivariable-adjusted CRP levels were similar in migraineurs and non-migraineurs for men (0.83 vs. 0.79 mg/l, P = 0.44) and for women (0.87 vs. 0.87 mg/l, P = 0.90). When further stratified by migraine aura and age, no differences were found between non-migraineurs, MO and MA among men. In women, CRP levels were borderline higher in those with MO compared with non-migraineurs and those with MA (1.01 mg/l vs. 0.81 and 0.75 mg/l, P = 0.08 and P = 0.08) in age group 19-34 years, but significantly lower in age group 60-81 years (0.52 mg/l vs. 1.07 and 1.01 mg/l, P = 0.007 and P = 0.03). CRP levels were not increased among migraine sufferers compared with non-migraineurs. Older women migraineurs without aura had lower CRP values than non-migraineurs and migraineurs with aura.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBlackwell Science Ltd.en
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-2982.2009.01865.xen
dc.subject.meshMigraine Disordersen
dc.subject.meshCardiovascular Diseasesen
dc.subject.meshPubMed in Processen
dc.titleC-reactive protein in migraine sufferers similar to that of non-migraineurs: the Reykjavik Studyen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Iceland, Hagi Hofsvallagata 53, IS-107 Reykjavik, Iceland. lsg@hi.isen
dc.identifier.journalCephalalgia : an international journal of headacheen

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