Inattention, hyperactivity/impulsivity and antisocial personality disorder. Which is the best predictor of false confessions?

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2336/95835
Title:
Inattention, hyperactivity/impulsivity and antisocial personality disorder. Which is the best predictor of false confessions?
Authors:
Gudjonsson, G H; Sigurdsson, J F; Einarsson, E; Bragason, O O
Citation:
Pers Individ Dif. 2010, 48(6):720-4
Issue Date:
1-Apr-2010
Abstract:
The aim of the study was to investigate the relative importance of Antisocial Personality Disorder (APD) and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) in predicting a history of false confessions to police. The participants were 90 male prisoners who were interviewed within 10 days of admission to prison. They completed the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview and the Wender-Utah Rating Scale (WURS) and DSM-IV-TR Checklist for childhood and adult ADHD symptoms, respectively. Over half of the participants (58%) met criteria for APD, half (50%) had ADHD in childhood and of those 60% were either fully symptomatic or in partial remission of their symptoms. Twenty-two (24%) reported a history of giving false confessions during police interrogation. Adult inattention and hyperactivity symptoms were significantly more common among the false confessors than the other prisoners with high and moderate effect size (1.03 and 0.58), respectively. Binary logistic regression ('forced entry method') was used to determine the order of the predictor variables of false confession and the data were entered in three blocks (APD, hyperactivity/impulsivity, and inattention). Inattention was the only remaining significant predictor after controlling for APD and hyperactivity/impulsivity. The findings suggest that inattention is a more powerful predictor of false confession than hyperactivity/impulsivity and APD.
Description:
To access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links field
Additional Links:
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.paid.2010.01.012

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorGudjonsson, G Hen
dc.contributor.authorSigurdsson, J Fen
dc.contributor.authorEinarsson, Een
dc.contributor.authorBragason, O Oen
dc.date.accessioned2010-04-07T09:59:19Z-
dc.date.available2010-04-07T09:59:19Z-
dc.date.issued2010-04-01-
dc.date.submitted2010-04-07-
dc.identifier.citationPers Individ Dif. 2010, 48(6):720-4en
dc.identifier.issn0191-8869-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.paid.2010.01.012-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/95835-
dc.descriptionTo access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links fielden
dc.description.abstractThe aim of the study was to investigate the relative importance of Antisocial Personality Disorder (APD) and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) in predicting a history of false confessions to police. The participants were 90 male prisoners who were interviewed within 10 days of admission to prison. They completed the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview and the Wender-Utah Rating Scale (WURS) and DSM-IV-TR Checklist for childhood and adult ADHD symptoms, respectively. Over half of the participants (58%) met criteria for APD, half (50%) had ADHD in childhood and of those 60% were either fully symptomatic or in partial remission of their symptoms. Twenty-two (24%) reported a history of giving false confessions during police interrogation. Adult inattention and hyperactivity symptoms were significantly more common among the false confessors than the other prisoners with high and moderate effect size (1.03 and 0.58), respectively. Binary logistic regression ('forced entry method') was used to determine the order of the predictor variables of false confession and the data were entered in three blocks (APD, hyperactivity/impulsivity, and inattention). Inattention was the only remaining significant predictor after controlling for APD and hyperactivity/impulsivity. The findings suggest that inattention is a more powerful predictor of false confession than hyperactivity/impulsivity and APD.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevier BVen
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.paid.2010.01.012en
dc.subjectADHDen
dc.subject.meshAttention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivityen
dc.subject.meshAntisocial Personality Disorderen
dc.titleInattention, hyperactivity/impulsivity and antisocial personality disorder. Which is the best predictor of false confessions?en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalPersonality and Individual Differencesen
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