FAQ about Hirsla and Open Access

  1. What is Hirsla?
  2. Who can submit items (articles) to Hirsla and how?
  3. Will I retain copyright to the items (articels) I submit to Hirsla?
  4. How do I register?
  5. Why should I submit my research articles) to Hirsla?
  6. Why is library department building and supporting IR like Hirsla?
  7. What is Handle?
  8. What kind of file types can be stored in Hirsla?
  9. Can I find articles (items) in Hirsla using external search engine like Google?
  10. What is Social bookmarking links?
  11. What is a researcher page and can anyone have one?
  12. What is the technology behind Hirsla?
  13. Do you have a list of all Icelandic health science journals that allow you to archive full text version of their articles in Hirsla?
  14. Common terms used in context with Open Access
  15. What is Open Access?
  16. What Open Access is not?
  17. What is Open Access journal?
  18. I have free online access to all the journals I need at my institution, so why do we need Open Access?

What is Hirsla?

Hirsla is Landspitali's (LSH) repository or digital archive. It is intended to capture, store and preserve LSH employees' scholarly works and to make it available to the research community through Open Access protocols. Hirsla contains articles from both Icelandic and international journals

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Who can submit items (articles) to Hirsla and how?

Any employe of LSH is able to deposit data in Hirsla. Submission policies are decided by the LSH library department and implemented by the Hirsla administrators. Please note that you must be the copyright holder or authorized by the copyright holder to make a submission.

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Will I retain copyright to the items (articels) I submit to Hirsla?

That depends on whether your work has previously been published. If your work has not been published before then yes, you retain your copyright. However, if you have been published in a traditional journal then most likely you will not retain copyright, but most traditional publishers now allow you to self-archive in your institutional repository like Hirsla.

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How do I register?

To register, go to http://hirsla.lsh.is/lsh/password-login You will be prompted to enter an email address. Once you have done this, you will be sent a token that, when clicked, will prompt you for more information and will create your account.

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Why should I submit my research (articles) to Hirsla?

"Online articles are more highly cited because of easier availability”. (Lawrence, Nature, 2001, 411:521)

To archive, preserve and increase the exposure of your work, both on a personal and institutional level. Research has shown that Open Access articles can increase the number of citations to your work by between 50 to 300% http://opcit.eprints.org/oacitation-biblio.html. More citations means more exposure means more citations which can ultimately assist with funding proposals as well as increasing the amount of available knowledge and research information to those who do not have access to high priced subscription based journals. Research papers hosted in Hirsla are also retrieved by a search engine, and have a higher ranking because of high quality metadata attached to them. Hirsla is (OAI-PMH) compliant.

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Why is library department building and supporting IR like Hirsla?

An IR like Hirsla is central to the mission of the Library, which is to plan for, and provide access to a broad spectrum of information resources and services to support the teaching, learning and research activities in the hospital. This mission flows from the purpose of the University, which is the discovery, communication and preservation of knowledge.

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What is Handle?

When your item becomes a part of the Hirsla repository it is assigned a persistent URL. This means that, unlike most URLs, this identifier will not have to be changed when the system migrates to new hardware, or when changes are made to the system. DSpace is committed to maintaining the integrity of this identifier so that you can safely use it to refer to your item when citing it in publications or other communications. Our persistent urls are registered with the Handle System, a comprehensive system for assigning, managing, and resolving persistent identifiers, known as "handles," for digital objects and other resources on the Internet. The Handle System is administered by the Corporation for National Research Initiatives (CNRI), which undertakes, fosters, and promotes research in the public interest.

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What kind of file types can be stored in Hirsla?

There is no limit to the file types you can store in Hirsla (e.g. PDFs, Word documents, Excel Spreadsheets, HTML, XML, multimedia files such as MP3, WAV or GIF and JPEGs, right down to proprietary file structures). It is even possible to store complete web pages and sites!

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Can I find articles (items) in Hirsla using external search engine like Google?

Absolutely, Google loves Hirsla, because Hirsla is Open Access Initiative Protocol for Metadata Harvesting (OAI-PMH) compliant. The OAI-PMH makes the metadata for each item available to external harvesters. That means that once an item is submitted into Hirsla it will be made available to search engines such as Google, Yahoo or Open Access search engines such as OAIster.

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What is Social bookmarking links?

Every item (article) page on Hirsla website now includes links to a range of social bookmarking / sharing websites.( Del.icio.us - Citeulike - Connotea - Facebook - Stumble it! ) Social bookmarking links can be found at the top of all items (articles) pages. These sites allow you to store, tag and share links across the internet. You can share these links both with friends and people with similar interests. You can also access your links from any computer you happen to be using. So, if you come across a item (article) in Hirsla that you find interesting and want to save for future reference or share it with other people, simply click on one of these links to add to your list.

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What is a researcher page and can anyone have one?

A researcher page is a unique web page, accessible from within the Hirsla repository, that allows a researcher to list more detailed information about themselves. Researcher pages can display links to personal websites, teaching or research information, additional personal details, a picture and links to research work both within and external to the repository. If you are intresting in making your own researcher page just ask our administrator osvaldur@landspitali.is to set one up for you.

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What is the technology behind Hirsla?

The software used for Hirsla is called DSpace. DSpace is an open source software package that provides the tools for management of digital assets, and is commonly used as the basis for an institutional repository. Open Repository is a service from BioMed Central we use to host and maintain our repository.

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Do you have a list of all Icelandic health science journals that allow you to archive full text version of their articles in Hirsla?

1. Læknablaðið : Icelandic medical journal - 2. Tímarit hjúkrunarfræðinga : Icelandic nursing journal - 3. Sálfræðiritið : tímarit Sálfræðingafélags Íslands - 4. Ljósmæðrablaðið : Icelandic  midwifery journal  - 5. Tímarit lífeindafræðinga - 6. Iðjuþjálfinn : Icelandic journal of occupational t herapy - 7. Sjúkraþjálfarinn - 8. Öldrun : tímarit um öldrunarmál - 9. Tannlæknablaðið : Icelandic dental journal

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Common terms used in context with Open Access

Eprint: an electronic copy of a research paper

Postprint: post-refereed paper

Publisher's version: published paper with the publisher's layout

Self-archiving: where you submit the material yourself

SHERPA: Securing a Hybrid Environment for Research, Preservation and Access

Read, Wikipedia defination about Open access publishing
 

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What is Open Access?

Open access means everything published is immediately available online for free. Read it, host it, print it, copy it, distribute it - all use is fair use, so long as the original authors and source are credited. Open access also means that a complete version of the published work is deposited in an archival public repository (such as PubMed Central and Hirsla), which enhances the utility of all deposited papers by allowing sophisticated searching, manipulation, and mining of the literature, using new and emerging tools.

Read, Wikipedia defination about: Open access publishing
 

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What Open Access is not?

There are various misunderstandings about Open Access. It is not self-publishing, nor a way to bypass peer-review and publication, nor is it a kind of second-class, cut-price publishing route. It is simply a means to make research results freely available online to the whole research community.

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What is Open Access journal?

Open access journals are scholarly journals that are available to the reader "without financial or other barrier other than access to the internet itself." Some are subsidized, and some require payment on behalf of the author.

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I have free online access to all the journals I need at my institution, so why do we need Open Access?

Although the journals might seem free, in reality your institution has paid a substantial site license fee to provide online access to journals at any computer (even your home computer) that accesses them through your institutional server. There are also strict conditions associated with this access, which limit uses such as archiving the journal content locally, creating teaching materials, incorporating published information into databases, posting articles on institutional web sites, and so on. Site licenses are expensive and cumbersome and can involve complex negotiations, because publishers use many different ways to figure out how much to charge, and of course, many institutions simply cannot afford these licenses. Open Access solves all of these problems.

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Ósvaldur Þorgrímsson.
Revised: 16/06/08