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dc.contributor.authorGudjonsson, Gisli
dc.contributor.authorSveinsdottir, Thorbjorg
dc.contributor.authorSigurdsson, Jon Fridrik
dc.contributor.authorJonsdottir, Johanna
dc.date.accessioned2010-08-19T11:18:03Z
dc.date.available2010-08-19T11:18:03Z
dc.date.issued2010-08-01
dc.date.submitted2010-08-19
dc.identifier.citationJ Forens Psychiatry Psychol. 2010, 21(4):569-86en
dc.identifier.issn1478-9949
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/14789940903540784
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/109916
dc.descriptionTo access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links fielden
dc.description.abstractThe main objective of the study was to further the understanding of age-related differences in children's ability to give an account of suspected sexual abuse during questioning. Video recordings of 285 Investigative Interviews referred by police and judges to the Children's House in Reykjavik over a five-year period were analysed. The great majority of the youngest children (31/2-5 years), and almost all of the older children, had the basic abilities to give testimony, although there were major age-related differences in their understanding of why they were being interviewed, their ability to answer open-ended questions about the suspected abuse, describe the immediate antecedents, conversation with the perpetrator, events immediately after the abuse, and ability to sustain concentration during the interview. The findings show that the interview technique used in the Children's House, which is based on Child Advocacy Model principles and protocol, is being used effectively in Iceland.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBrunner - Routledge (US)en
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14789940903540784en
dc.subject.meshChild Abuse, Sexualen
dc.titleThe ability of suspected victims of childhood sexual abuse (CSA) to give evidence. Findings from the Children's House in Icelanden
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Forensic Psychiatry & Psychologyen
html.description.abstractThe main objective of the study was to further the understanding of age-related differences in children's ability to give an account of suspected sexual abuse during questioning. Video recordings of 285 Investigative Interviews referred by police and judges to the Children's House in Reykjavik over a five-year period were analysed. The great majority of the youngest children (31/2-5 years), and almost all of the older children, had the basic abilities to give testimony, although there were major age-related differences in their understanding of why they were being interviewed, their ability to answer open-ended questions about the suspected abuse, describe the immediate antecedents, conversation with the perpetrator, events immediately after the abuse, and ability to sustain concentration during the interview. The findings show that the interview technique used in the Children's House, which is based on Child Advocacy Model principles and protocol, is being used effectively in Iceland.


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