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dc.contributor.authorLove, T J
dc.contributor.authorGudjonsson, J E
dc.contributor.authorValdimarsson, H
dc.contributor.authorGudbjornsson, B
dc.date.accessioned2010-08-19T11:22:28Z
dc.date.available2010-08-19T11:22:28Z
dc.date.issued2010-08-01
dc.date.submitted2010-08-19
dc.identifier.citationScand. J. Rheumatol. 2010, 39(4):299-302en
dc.identifier.issn1502-7732
dc.identifier.pmid20476857
dc.identifier.doi10.3109/03009741003604559
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/109935
dc.descriptionTo access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links fielden
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVES: Psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis (PsA) are associated with nail changes. Recent reports suggest that nail changes may be a part of the enthesitis of PsA and that they predict the onset of arthritis among patients with psoriasis, but they have not reported on subclasses of nail changes. However, earlier reports suggested that onycholysis is the nail change most strongly associated with PsA. If nail changes in PsA are a sign of enthesitis, they might be associated with small joint disease in general and the objective of this study was to test this hypothesis. METHODS: A total of 154 patients recruited through the Reykjavik Psoriatic Arthritis Study had a joint, skin, and nail evaluation. Associations with small joint disease were tested using univariate analysis, and confirmed in a multivariate model. RESULTS: Onycholysis had a strong association with small joint involvement [odds ratio (OR) 3.42, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.41-8.92], while other types of nail changes did not. The number of swollen joints and shorter disease duration were also associated with small joint disease. CONCLUSIONS: Onycholysis is associated with small joint disease in PsA. Future studies of PsA should report the subtypes of nail changes. Longitudinal studies are needed to determine whether onycholysis predicts PsA.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherInforma Healthcareen
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.3109/03009741003604559en
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten
dc.subject.meshAdulten
dc.subject.meshAgeden
dc.subject.meshAged, 80 and overen
dc.subject.meshArthritis, Psoriaticen
dc.subject.meshChi-Square Distributionen
dc.subject.meshCross-Sectional Studiesen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshFinger Jointen
dc.subject.meshHealth Surveysen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshIcelanden
dc.subject.meshInflammationen
dc.subject.meshMaleen
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden
dc.subject.meshOnycholysisen
dc.subject.meshPatient Selectionen
dc.subject.meshRegression Analysisen
dc.subject.meshSeverity of Illness Indexen
dc.subject.meshToe Jointen
dc.titleSmall joint involvement in psoriatic arthritis is associated with onycholysis: the Reykjavik Psoriatic Arthritis Study.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentBrigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.en
dc.identifier.journalScandinavian journal of rheumatologyen
html.description.abstractOBJECTIVES: Psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis (PsA) are associated with nail changes. Recent reports suggest that nail changes may be a part of the enthesitis of PsA and that they predict the onset of arthritis among patients with psoriasis, but they have not reported on subclasses of nail changes. However, earlier reports suggested that onycholysis is the nail change most strongly associated with PsA. If nail changes in PsA are a sign of enthesitis, they might be associated with small joint disease in general and the objective of this study was to test this hypothesis. METHODS: A total of 154 patients recruited through the Reykjavik Psoriatic Arthritis Study had a joint, skin, and nail evaluation. Associations with small joint disease were tested using univariate analysis, and confirmed in a multivariate model. RESULTS: Onycholysis had a strong association with small joint involvement [odds ratio (OR) 3.42, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.41-8.92], while other types of nail changes did not. The number of swollen joints and shorter disease duration were also associated with small joint disease. CONCLUSIONS: Onycholysis is associated with small joint disease in PsA. Future studies of PsA should report the subtypes of nail changes. Longitudinal studies are needed to determine whether onycholysis predicts PsA.


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