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dc.contributor.authorThorsteinsson, Haraldur
dc.contributor.authorReynisson, Hjortur M
dc.contributor.authorSigurdardottir, Laufey Y
dc.contributor.authorDagbjartsson, Atli
dc.contributor.authorKarlsson, Karl AE
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-14T13:37:57Z
dc.date.available2010-09-14T13:37:57Z
dc.date.issued2010-07-29
dc.date.submitted2010-09-14
dc.identifier.citationBehav. Brain Res. 2010, 211(1):11-5en
dc.identifier.issn1872-7549
dc.identifier.pmid20188125
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.bbr.2010.02.034
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/111157
dc.descriptionTo access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links fielden
dc.description.abstractThe co-expression of behavioral and neural events represents a situation conducive to Hebbian-type neuroplasticity and may provide a reasonable explanation for how the amount of movement during the perinatal period contributes to neuromotor development. Direct current-coupled electrographic recordings in premature infants indicate that the majority of the electrographic activity is exhibited in a slow frequency range that is either distorted or not visible using traditional recording methods. Therefore, we provide a description of the behavioral correlates of direct current-coupled electrographic recordings in six premature human infants (3 males and 3 females; 30-34 weeks). We report, in concert with prior data, that electrographic activity and movements occur in tightly coupled discrete bouts. Surprisingly, spontaneous activity transients, which are slow, high amplitude, multiband electrographic events, typically precede startles; thereby revealing a previously unknown coupling of early neural and behavioral events in humans. Taken together, the present findings open novel venues for studying and dissecting mammalian neuromotor development.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevier/North-Holland Biomedical Pressen
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbr.2010.02.034en
dc.subject.meshArousalen
dc.subject.meshBehavioren
dc.subject.meshCerebral Cortexen
dc.subject.meshElectroencephalographyen
dc.subject.meshEvoked Potentialsen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshInfant, Newbornen
dc.subject.meshInfant, Prematureen
dc.subject.meshMaleen
dc.subject.meshMotor Activityen
dc.subject.meshMovementen
dc.subject.meshNeuronal Plasticityen
dc.subject.meshStartle Reactionen
dc.subject.meshTime Factorsen
dc.titleBehavioral correlates of direct current-coupled electrographic activity in premature infants.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Biomedical Engineering, School of Science and Engineering, Reykjavik University, Reykjavik, Iceland.en
dc.identifier.journalBehavioural brain researchen
html.description.abstractThe co-expression of behavioral and neural events represents a situation conducive to Hebbian-type neuroplasticity and may provide a reasonable explanation for how the amount of movement during the perinatal period contributes to neuromotor development. Direct current-coupled electrographic recordings in premature infants indicate that the majority of the electrographic activity is exhibited in a slow frequency range that is either distorted or not visible using traditional recording methods. Therefore, we provide a description of the behavioral correlates of direct current-coupled electrographic recordings in six premature human infants (3 males and 3 females; 30-34 weeks). We report, in concert with prior data, that electrographic activity and movements occur in tightly coupled discrete bouts. Surprisingly, spontaneous activity transients, which are slow, high amplitude, multiband electrographic events, typically precede startles; thereby revealing a previously unknown coupling of early neural and behavioral events in humans. Taken together, the present findings open novel venues for studying and dissecting mammalian neuromotor development.


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