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dc.contributor.authorLíndal, E
dc.contributor.authorBergmann, S
dc.contributor.authorThorlacius, S
dc.contributor.authorStefansson, J G
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-16T11:17:28Z
dc.date.available2010-09-16T11:17:28Z
dc.date.issued1997-09-01
dc.date.submitted2010-09-16
dc.identifier.citationActa Neurol. Scand. 1997, 96(3):158-62en
dc.identifier.issn0001-6314
dc.identifier.pmid9300068
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1600-0404.1997.tb00259.x
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/111236
dc.descriptionTo access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links fielden
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: In order to clarify the lifetime likelihood of developing psychiatric disorder following the Akureyri disease, we have investigated 55 well documented cases of the Akureyri disease. MATERIALS AND METHODS: All participants were interviewed and diagnosed as to psychiatric disorders according to DSM-III. RESULTS: Of the 55 subjects included in this analysis 53 were women. The mean age of the participants was 67.7 years. The most common problem was agoraphobia with panic attacks 12.7% (P < 0.0001); agoraphobia without panic attacks 21.8% (P < 0.0001); social phobia 14.5% (P < 0.001); simple phobia 18.1% (P < 0.05); schizophrenia 3.6% (P < 0.01); and alcohol dependence 5.4% (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Prolonged chronic fatigue most commonly results in anxiety disorders. Following the infection, the more serious psychiatric disorders do not seem to play a major role in the long run.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwellen
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-0404.1997.tb00259.xen
dc.subject.meshAdulten
dc.subject.meshAgeden
dc.subject.meshAgoraphobiaen
dc.subject.meshAnxiety Disordersen
dc.subject.meshDiagnosis, Differentialen
dc.subject.meshFatigue Syndrome, Chronicen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshFollow-Up Studiesen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshIcelanden
dc.subject.meshMaleen
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden
dc.subject.meshPersonality Assessmenten
dc.subject.meshPsychiatric Status Rating Scalesen
dc.titleAnxiety disorders: a result of long-term chronic fatigue--the psychiatric characteristics of the sufferers of Iceland diseaseen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Psychiatry, National University Hospital, Reykjavík, Iceland.en
dc.identifier.journalActa neurologica Scandinavicaen
html.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: In order to clarify the lifetime likelihood of developing psychiatric disorder following the Akureyri disease, we have investigated 55 well documented cases of the Akureyri disease. MATERIALS AND METHODS: All participants were interviewed and diagnosed as to psychiatric disorders according to DSM-III. RESULTS: Of the 55 subjects included in this analysis 53 were women. The mean age of the participants was 67.7 years. The most common problem was agoraphobia with panic attacks 12.7% (P < 0.0001); agoraphobia without panic attacks 21.8% (P < 0.0001); social phobia 14.5% (P < 0.001); simple phobia 18.1% (P < 0.05); schizophrenia 3.6% (P < 0.01); and alcohol dependence 5.4% (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Prolonged chronic fatigue most commonly results in anxiety disorders. Following the infection, the more serious psychiatric disorders do not seem to play a major role in the long run.


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