• Low rate of reoperations after acute type A aortic dissection repair from The Nordic Consortium Registry.

      Pan, Emily; Gudbjartsson, Tomas; Ahlsson, Anders; Fuglsang, Simon; Geirsson, Arnar; Hansson, Emma C; Hjortdal, Vibeke; Jeppsson, Anders; Järvelä, Kati; Mennander, Ari; et al. (MOSBY-ELSEVIER, 2018-09-01)
      To describe the relationship between the extent of primary aortic repair and the incidence of reoperations after surgery for type A aortic dissection. A retrospective cohort of 1159 patients treated for type A aortic dissection at eight Nordic low- to medium-sized cardiothoracic centers from 2005 to 2014. Data were gathered from patient records and national registries. Patients were separately divided into 3 groups according to the distal anastomoses technique (ascending aorta [n = 791], hemiarch [n = 247], and total arch [n = 66]), and into 2 groups for proximal repair (aortic root replacement [n = 285] and supracoronary repair [n = 832]). Freedom from reoperation was estimated with cumulative incidence survival and Fine-Gray competing risk regression model was used to identify independent risk factors for reoperation. The median follow-up was 2.7 years (range, 0-10 years). Altogether 51 out of 911 patients underwent reoperation. Freedom from distal reoperation at 5 years was 96.9%, with no significant difference between the groups (P = .22). Freedom from proximal reoperation at 5 years was 97.8%, with no difference between the groups (P = .84). Neither DeBakey classification nor the extent of proximal or distal repair predicted freedom from a later reoperation. The only independent risk factor associated with a later proximal reoperation was a history of connective tissue disease. Type A aortic dissection repair in low- to medium-volume centers was associated with a low reoperation rate and satisfactory midterm survival. The extent of the primary repair had no significant influence on reoperation rate or midterm survival.
    • Malperfusion in acute type A aortic dissection: An update from the Nordic Consortium for Acute Type A Aortic Dissection.

      Zindovic, Igor; Gudbjartsson, Tomas; Ahlsson, Anders; Fuglsang, Simon; Gunn, Jarmo; Hansson, Emma C; Hjortdal, Vibeke; Järvelä, Kati; Jeppsson, Anders; Mennander, Ari; et al. (Mosby-Elsevier, 2019-04)
      To evaluate the effect of preoperative malperfusion on 30-day and late mortality and postoperative complications using data from the Nordic Consortium for Acute Type A Aortic Dissection (ATAAD) registry. We studied 1159 patients who underwent ATAAD surgery between January 2005 and December 2014 at 8 Nordic centers. Multivariable logistic and Cox regression analyses were performed to identify independent predictors of 30-day and late mortality. Preoperative malperfusion was identified in 381 of 1159 patients (33%) who underwent ATAAD surgery. Thirty-day mortality was 28.9% in patients with preoperative malperfusion and 12.1% in those without. Independent predictors of 30-day mortality included any malperfusion (odds ratio, 2.76; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.94-3.93), cardiac malperfusion (odds ratio, 2.37; 95% CI, 1.34-4.17), renal malperfusion (odds ratio, 2.38; 95% CI, 1.23-4.61) and peripheral malperfusion (odds ratio, 1.95; 95% CI, 1.26-3.01). Any malperfusion (hazard ratio, 1.72; 95% CI, 1.21-2.43), cardiac malperfusion (hazard ratio, 1.89; 95% CI, 1.24-2.87) and gastrointestinal malperfusion (hazard ratio, 2.25; 95% CI, 1.18-4.26) were predictors of late mortality. Malperfusion was associated with significantly poorer survival at 1, 3, and 5 years (95.0% ± 0.9% vs 88.7% ± 1.9%, 90.1% ± 1.3% vs 84.0% ± 2.4%, and 85.4% ± 1.7% vs 80.8% ± 2.7%; log rank P = .009). Malperfusion has a significant influence on early and late outcomes in ATAAD surgery. Management of preoperative malperfusion remains a major challenge in reducing mortality associated with surgical treatment of ATAAD.
    • Medium-term survival after surgery for acute Type A aortic dissection is improving

      Olsson, Christian; Ahlsson, Anders; Fuglsang, Simon; Geirsson, Arnar; Gunn, Jarmo; Hansson, Emma C; Hjortdal, Vibeke; Jarvela, Kati; Jeppsson, Anders; Mennander, Ari; et al. (Oxford University Press, 2017-11)
      OBJECTIVES: To report long-term survival and predictors of mortality in patients included in a large, contemporary, multicentre, multinational database: Nordic Consortium for Acute Type A Aortic Dissection (NORCAAD), which consists of 8 centres in 4 Nordic countries. METHODS: Currently, NORCAAD includes 1159 patients operated between 2005 and 2014. In 30-day survivors (n = 955, 82%), the Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazard methods were used to analyse medium-term (up to 8 years) survival and relative survival versus a matched normal population. Pre- and intraoperative predictors were expressed as hazard ratio (HR) with 95% confidence interval (95% CI). RESULTS: Cumulative follow-up was 3514 patient-years with a median of 3.2 years (range 0-10.2 years). Survival was 95% (95% CI 93-96) at 1 year, 86% (95% CI 83-88) at 5 years and 76% (95% CI 72-81) at 8 years. Relative survival versus a matched normal population was 95% (95% CI 94-97) at 1 year, 90% (95% CI 87-93) at 5 years and 85% (95% CI 80-90) at 8 years. In multivariable analysis, increased age (HR 1.05 per year, 95% CI 1.04-1.07), previous abdominal or thoracic aortic repair (HR 3.2, 95% CI 1.6-6.4) and chronic renal disease (HR 2.7, 95% CI 1.2-6.2) were associated with increased medium-term mortality. Open distal anastomosis (HR 0.55, 95% CI 0.35-0.87) and operation in the 2010-2014 period (HR 0.90, 95% CI 0.83-0.97) were associated with decreased medium-term mortality. CONCLUSIONS: Medium-term survival after acute Type A aortic dissection in the NORCAAD registry is satisfactory, close to a matched normal population and improved in the later part of the study period. The use of open distal anastomosis was associated with decreased medium-term mortality.
    • The Nordic Consortium for Acute type A Aortic Dissection (NORCAAD): objectives and design().

      Geirsson, Arnar; Ahlsson, Anders; Franco-Cereceda, Anders; Fuglsang, Simon; Gunn, Jarmo; Hansson, Emma C; Hjortdal, Vibeke; Jarvela, Kati; Jeppsson, Anders; Mennander, Ari; et al. (Taylor & Francis, 2016)
      The Nordic Consortium for Acute Type A Aortic Dissection (NORCAAD) is a collaborative effort of Nordic cardiac surgery centers to study acute type A aortic dissection (ATAAD). Here, we outline the overall objectives and the design of NORCAAD.
    • Outcome after type A aortic dissection repair in patients with preoperative cardiac arrest.

      Pan, Emily; Wallinder, Andreas; Peterström, Eric; Geirsson, Arnar; Olsson, Christian; Ahlsson, Anders; Fuglsang, Simon; Gunn, Jarmo; Hansson, Emma C; Hjortdal, Vibeke; et al. (ELSEVIER IRELAND, 2019-11)
      AIM OF THE STUDY: Patients presenting with acute type A aortic dissection (ATAAD) and cardiac arrest before surgery are considered to have very poor prognosis, but limited data is available. We used a large database to evaluate the outcome of ATAAD patients with a cardiac arrest before surgery. METHODS: We evaluated 1154 surgically treated ATAAD patients from the Nordic Consortium for Acute Type A Aortic Dissection (NORCAAD) database between 2005 and 2014. Patients with (n = 44, 3.8%) and without preoperative cardiac arrest were compared and variables univariably associated with mortality in the cardiac arrest group were identified. Median follow-up time was 2.7 years (interquartile range 0.5-5.5). RESULTS: Thirty-day mortality in the arrest and non-arrest group was 43.2% and 16.6%, respectively (odds ratio [OR] 3.83, CI 2.06-7.09; P < 0.001). In the nine patients with ongoing cardiopulmonary resuscitation when cardiopulmonary bypass was initiated, five died intraoperatively and one died after 65 days. In patients surviving the operation, stroke was significantly more common in the arrest group (48.4% vs 18.2%; OR 4.21, CI 2.05-8.67; P < 0.001). In total, 50.0% (22/44) of the arrest patients survived to the end of follow-up. Non-survivors in the arrest group more often had DeBakey type I dissection, cardiac tamponade, cardiac malperfusion and higher preoperative serum lactate (all P < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Early mortality and complications after ATAAD surgery in patients with a preoperative cardiac arrest are high, but mid-term outcome after surviving the initial period is acceptable. Preoperative cardiac arrest should not be considered an absolute contraindication for a surgical ATAAD repair.
    • Recombinant factor VIIa use in acute type A aortic dissection repair: A multicenter propensity-score-matched report from the Nordic Consortium for Acute Type A Aortic Dissection.

      Zindovic, Igor; Sjögren, Johan; Ahlsson, Anders; Bjursten, Henrik; Fuglsang, Simon; Geirsson, Arnar; Ingemansson, Richard; Hansson, Emma C; Mennander, Ari; Olsson, Christian; et al. (Mosby-Elsevier, 2017-12)
      Surgery for acute type A aortic dissection (ATAAD) is often complicated by excessive bleeding. Recombinant factor VIIa (rFVIIa) effectively treats refractory bleeding associated with ATAAD surgery; however, adverse effects of rFVIIa in these patients have not been fully assessed. Here we evaluated rFVIIa treatment in ATAAD surgery using the Nordic Consortium for Acute Type A Aortic Dissection (NORCAAD) database.
    • Stroke in acute type A aortic dissection: the Nordic Consortium for Acute Type A Aortic Dissection (NORCAAD).

      Chemtob, Raphaelle A; Fuglsang, Simon; Geirsson, Arnar; Ahlsson, Anders; Olsson, Christian; Gunn, Jarmo; Ahmad, Khalil; Hansson, Emma C; Pan, Emily; Arnadottir, Linda O; et al. (Oxford University Press, 2020-07-20)
      Objectives: Stroke is a serious complication in patients with acute type A aortic dissection (ATAAD). Previous studies investigating stroke in ATAAD patients have been limited by small cohorts and have shown diverging results. We sought to identify risk factors for stroke and to evaluate the effect of stroke on outcomes in surgical ATAAD patients. Methods: The Nordic Consortium for Acute Type A Aortic Dissection database included patients operated for ATAAD at 8 Scandinavian Hospitals between 2005 and 2014. Results: Stroke occurred in 177 (15.7%) out of 1128 patients. Patients with stroke presented more frequently with cerebral malperfusion (20.6% vs 6.3%, P < 0.001), syncope (30.6% vs 17.6%, P < 0.001), cardiogenic shock (33.1% vs 20.7%, P < 0.001) and pericardial tamponade (25.9% vs 14.7%, P < 0.001) and more often underwent total aortic arch replacement (10.7% vs 4.7%, P = 0.016), compared to patients without stroke. In the 86 patients presenting with cerebral malperfusion, 38.4% developed stroke. Thirty-day and 5-year mortality in patients with and without stroke were 27.1% vs 13.6% and 42.9% vs 25.6%, respectively. Stroke was an independent predictor of early- [odds ratio 2.02, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.34-3.05; P < 0.001] and midterm mortality (hazard ratio 1.68, 95% CI 1.27-2.23; P < 0.001). Conclusions: Stroke in ATAAD patients is associated with increased early- and midterm mortality. Preoperative cerebral malperfusion and impaired haemodynamics, as well as total aortic arch replacement, were more frequent among patients who developed stroke. Importantly, a large proportion of patients presenting with cerebral malperfusion did not develop a permanent stroke, indicating that signs of cerebral malperfusion should not be considered a contraindication for surgery. Keywords: Acute type A aortic dissection; Cardiac surgery; Cerebral malperfusion; Stroke.