• Immediate surge in female visits to the cardiac emergency department following the economic collapse in Iceland: an observational study.

      Guðjónsdóttir, Guðlaug Rakel; Kristjánsson, Már; Ólafsson, Örn; Arnar, Davíð O; Getz, Linn; Sigurðsson, Jóhann Ágúst; Guðmundsson, Sigurður; Valdimarsdóttir, Unnur; Department of Emergency, Landspítali University Hospital, Reykjavík, Iceland. (BMJ Publishing Group, 2012-09)
      The dramatic economic collapse in Iceland in October 2008 was associated with an immediate short-term increase in female attendance at the cardiac ED.
    • Risk of repeat visits, hospitalisation and death after uncompleted and completed visits to the emergency department: a prospective observation study.

      Geirsson, Oli Pall; Gunnarsdottir, Oddny Sigurborg; Baldursson, Jon; Hrafnkelsson, Birgir; Rafnsson, Vilhjalmur; Department of Mathematics, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland 2Office of Education, Research and Development, the Landspitali, the National University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland 3Ministry of Welfare, Reykjavik, Iceland 4Department of Preventive Medicine, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland (BMJ Pub. Group, 2013-08)
      The needs of patients with uncompleted visits to the emergency department (ED) are uncertain. The aim was to evaluate ED patients who leave against medical advice (AMA) and who leave without being seen (WBS) regarding repeat ED visits, hospitalisation and mortality within 30 days.
    • Risk of suicide and fatal drug poisoning after discharge from the emergency department: a nested case-control study

      Gunnarsdottir, Oddny S; Rafnsson, Vilhjalmur; Office of Education, Research and Development, Landspitali, Reykjavik, Iceland. (BMJ Pub. Group, 2010-02-01)
      OBJECTIVES: The objectives were to study the risk of suicide and fatal drug poisoning among emergency department users who had been discharged home, based on the main diagnoses selected by the emergency physician upon discharge. METHODS: This is a case-control study nested in a cohort of users of the emergency department who had been discharged. The cases of suicide (n=41) and fatal drug poisoning (n=21) were identified from the National Cause-of-death Registry, and five times as many controls were selected from users of the emergency department. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to calculate the OR and 95% CI adjusted for age and gender. RESULTS: Frequent visits to the emergency department were significantly associated with suicide and fatal poisoning. The study period spanned 7 years. The OR for suicide among cases and controls was 7.84 for those diagnosed as having mental disorders, 96.89 for those with use of alcohol, 24.51 for those with drug intoxication and 2.69 for those with a non-causative diagnosis. The OR for fatal poisoning for cases and controls was 12.26 for those with use of alcohol, 37.22 for those with drug intoxication and 5.76 for those with the classification category factors influencing health status. CONCLUSIONS: The clinical implication is that patients with any combination of previous main diagnoses of mental disorder, alcohol use, drug intoxication, a non-causative diagnosis or with the classification category factors influencing health status should be evaluated and assessed for potential risk of suicide or fatal drug poisoning.