Journal Articles

Tímaritsgreinar

Collections in this community

Recent Submissions

  • Giant gastric lipoma successfully removed by endoscopic submucosal dissection: case report and systematic review.

    Ingason, Arnar B; Theodors, Asgeir; Agustsson, Arnar S; Arnarson, Adalsteinn; 1 a Department of Medicine , University of Iceland , Reykjavik , Iceland. 2 b Department of Gastroenterology , Landspitali University Hospital , Reykjavik , Iceland. 3 c Department of General Surgery , Landspitali University Hospital , Reykjavik , Iceland. (Taylor & Francis, 2018-08-01)
    Gastric lipomas are rare adipose tumors that constitute less than 1% of gastric tumors. While lipomas generally do not need removal unless symptomatic, endoscopic resection has been proposed as safe for gastric lipomas smaller than 2 cm. Yet, there is no consensus on the optimal treatment method for larger lipomas. We report a case of a giant 7-cm gastric lipoma successfully removed by endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) and systematically review the literature for gastric lipomas removed by ESD. Systematic review was conducted by searching PubMed and Scopus databases, up to 15 February 2018, using combinations of relevant terms. We report a 55-year-old male with known gastroesophageal reflux disease and asthma, who sought medical attention due to chronic heartburn and asthma exacerbations. These symptoms were attributed to a large 7 cm × 3 cm gastric lipoma that caused gastric outlet obstruction. The lipoma was safely removed by ESD, allowing quick recovery and alleviation of symptoms. In our review, we identified 20 gastric lipomas treated with ESD, with 15 (75%) being 2 cm or larger. The average size of the lipomas was 4 cm (range: 1.2-9 cm). All lipomas were limited to the submucosa, with 80% of the tumors located in the antrum. Three lipomas were removed by submucosal tunneling. All tumors were successfully removed en bloc and no major complications were reported. Our findings support the conclusion that ESD may be a safe alternative to conventional surgery for removal of large symptomatic gastric lipomas.
  • Editor's Choice - The Impact of Centralisation and Endovascular Aneurysm Repair on Treatment of Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms Based on International Registries.

    Budtz-Lilly, Jacob; Björck, Martin; Venermo, Maarit; Debus, Sebastian; Behrendt, Christian-Alexander; Altreuther, Martin; Beiles, Barry; Szeberin, Zoltan; Eldrup, Nikolaj; Danielsson, Gudmundur; Thomson, Ian; Wigger, Pius; Khashram, Manar; Loftus, Ian; Mani, Kevin; 1 Department of Surgical Sciences, Vascular Surgery, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; Department of Cardio-Thoracic and Vascular Surgery, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark. Electronic address: jacobudt@rm.dk. 2 Department of Surgical Sciences, Vascular Surgery, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. 3 Department of Vascular Surgery, Helsinki University Hospital, Helsinki, Finland. 4 Department of Vascular Medicine, University Heart Centre Hamburg - Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany. 5 Department of Vascular Surgery, St Olavs Hospital, Trondheim, Norway. 6 Australian and New Zealand Society for Vascular Surgery, East Melbourne, Australia. 7 Department of Vascular Surgery, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary. 8 Department of Cardio-Thoracic and Vascular Surgery, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark. 9 National University Hospital of Iceland, Department of Surgery, Reykjavík, Iceland. 10 Department of Vascular Surgery, Dunedin School of Medicine, Dunedin Hospital, Dunedin, New Zealand. 11 Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Kantonsspital Winterthur, Switzerland. 12 Department of Surgery, University of Otago, Christchurch, New Zealand. 13 Department of Vascular Surgery, St George's University of London, London, UK. (W.B. Saunders, 2018-08-01)
    Current management of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms (RAAA) varies among centres and countries, particularly in the degree of implementation of endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) and levels of vascular surgery centralisation. This study assesses these variations and the impact they have on outcomes. RAAA repairs from vascular surgical registries in 11 countries, 2010-2013, were investigated. Data were analysed overall, per country, per treatment modality (EVAR or open aortic repair [OAR]), centre volume (quintiles IV), and whether centres were predominantly EVAR (≥50% of RAAA performed with EVAR [EVAR(p)]) or predominantly OAR [OAR(p)]. Primary outcome was peri-operative mortality. Data are presented as either mean values or percentages with 95% CI within parentheses, and compared with chi-square tests, as well as with adjusted OR. There were 9273 patients included. Mean age was 74.7 (74.5-74.9) years, and 82.7% of patients were men (81.9-83.6). Mean AAA diameter at rupture was 7.6 cm (7.5-7.6). Of these aneurysms, 10.7% (10.0-11.4) were less than 5.5 cm. EVAR was performed in 23.1% (22.3-24.0). There were 6817 procedures performed in OAR(p) centres and 1217 performed in EVAR(p) centres. Overall peri-operative mortality was 28.8% (27.9-29.8). Peri-operative mortality for OAR was 32.1% (31.0-33.2) and for EVAR 17.9% (16.3-19.6), p < .001, and the adjusted OR was 0.38 (0.31-0.47), p < .001. The peri-operative mortality was 23.0% in EVAR(p) centres (20.6-25.4), 29.7% in OAR(p) centres (28.6-30.8), p < .001; adjusted OR = 0.60 (0.46-0.78), p < .001. Peri-operative mortality was lower in the highest volume centres (QI > 22 repairs per year), 23.3% (21.2-25.4) than in QII-V, 30.0% (28.9-31.1), p < .001. Peri-operative mortality after OAR was lower in high volume centres compared with the other centres, 25.3% (23.0-27.6) and 34.0% (32.7-35.4), respectively, p < .001. There was no significant difference in peri-operative mortality after EVAR between centres based on volume. Peri-operative mortality is lower in centres with a primary EVAR approach or with high case volume. Most repairs, however, are still performed in low volume centres and in centres with a primary OAR strategy. Reorganisation of acute vascular surgical services may improve outcomes of RAAA repair.
  • Dramatically improved survival in multiple myeloma patients in the recent decade: results from a Swedish population-based study.

    Thorsteinsdottir, Sigrun; Dickman, Paul W; Landgren, Ola; Blimark, Cecilie; Hultcrantz, Malin; Turesson, Ingemar; Björkholm, Magnus; Kristinsson, Sigurdur Y; 1 Department of Internal Medicine, Landspitali - The National University Hospital of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland. 2 Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland. 3 Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. 4 Myeloma Service, Division of Hematologic Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, NY, USA. 5 Department of Internal Medicine, Hematology Section, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden. 6 Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology, Karolinska University Hospital and Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. 7 Department of Hematology and Coagulation Disorders, Skane University Hospital, Malmo, Sweden. 8 Department of Internal Medicine, Landspitali - The National University Hospital of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland sigyngvi@hi.is. (Ferrata Storti Foundation, 2018-09-01)
  • Menntun, störf og tækifæri hér og erlendis

    Júlíana Sigurveig Guðjónsdóttir; Agnar Óli Snorrason (Sjúkraliðafélag Íslands, 2018-10)
  • Adrenergic and metabolic effects of electrical weapons: review and meta-analysis of human data.

    Kunz, S N; Calkins, H G; Adamec, J; Kroll, M W; [ 1 ] Landspitali Univ Hosp, Dept Forens Pathol, IS-101 Reykjavik, Iceland Show more [ 2 ] Johns Hopkins Med Inst, Baltimore, MD 21205 USA Show more [ 3 ] Ludwig Maximilians Univ Munchen, Inst Forens Med, Munich, Germany Show more [ 4 ] Univ Minnesota, Dept Biomed Engn, Minneapolis, MN USA Show more [ 5 ] Calif Polytech Inst, San Luis Obispo, CA USA (Springer, 2018-09-01)
    Electronic control with the CEW (conducted electrical weapon) has gained widespread acceptance as the preferred force option due to its significant injury reduction. However, a CEW application does stress the human body. In the case of the CEW, the human body response is similar to the challenge of physical exercise combined with emotional stress over a very short time interval. There has been concern whether the tension of the skeletal-muscle system together with the emotional stress of being exposed to the effects of a CEW, can lead to severe metabolic dysfunction. A systematic and careful search of the MedLine database was performed to find publications describing pathophysiological effects of CEWs. Additional publications were collected through a manual search of reference lists in retrieved articles. After preliminary exclusions, we carefully reviewed the remaining publications and found 24 papers reporting prospective human clinical research data on adrenergic, ventilation, or metabolic effects. Where there were multiple studies on the same endpoints, we performed meta-analyses. A CEW exposure provides a clinically insignificant increase in heart rate (7.5 BPM) and a drop in both systolic and diastolic blood pressure. Alpha-amylase goes down but cortisol levels increase-both epinephrine and norepinephrine levels are increased by levels similar to mild exercise. A CEW exposure increases ventilation but does not appear to interfere with gas exchange. Lactate is increased slightly while the pH is decreased slightly with changes equivalent to mild exercise. The lactate and pH changes appear quickly and do not appear to be affected by increasing the exposure duration from 5 to 30 s. Thorough review and meta-analyses show that electrical weapon exposures have mixed and mild adrenergic effects. Ventilation is increased and there are metabolic changes similar to mild exercise.
  • Frá bræðralagi til fagmennsku. Siðferðileg viðmið íslenskra lækna í hundrað ár. Vilhjálmur Árnason

    Vilhjálmur Árnason; Prófessor í heimspeki við Háskóla Íslands (Læknafélag Íslands, 2018-09)
    Læknar hafa frá öndverðu haft siðferðileg viðmið í starfi sínu. Elsta og þekktasta dæmið er eiðurinn sem kenndur er við gríska lækninn Hippókrates (460-370 f. Kr.). Segja má að hinn siðferðilegi kjarni eiðsins sé fólginn í þessu ákvæði: „Ég heiti því að beita læknisaðgerðum til líknar sjúkum, eftir því sem ég hef vit á og getu til, en aldrei í því skyni að valda miska eða tjóni.“1 Hér er velferð sjúklingsins í fyrirrúmi og enn er vísað til kröfunnar primum non nocere, umfram allt valdið ekki miska, sem meginsiðareglu læknislistarinnar. Samkvæmt nútímalegri greiningu á siðareglum eru slík ákvæði um að gæta hagsmuni sjúklinga hluti af frumskyldum lækna.2,3 Aðrir meginflokkar siðareglna eru félagslegar skyldur við almenning og samfélag, hæfniskyldur að viðhalda þekkingu og færni og skyldur gagnvart starfssystkinum (stundum nefndar bróðurlegar skyldur).
  • Ormur í auga og endurteknar bólgur á útlimum - Sjúkratilfelli

    Davíð Þór Bragason; María Soffía Gottfreðsdóttir; Birgir Jóhannsson; Magnús Gottfreðsson; 1) 2) Augndeild Landspítala 3) 4) Smitsjúkdómadeild Landspítala (Læknafélag Íslands, 2018-09)
    Lýst er tveimur tilfellum af lóasýki hjá konum búsettum hér á landi, 35 ára konu sem fæddist í Afríku og 31 árs konu sem hafði ferðast um Afríku. Þær leituðu til læknis vegna óþæginda frá auga. Við skoðun sást í báðum tilfellum ormur, um 3 cm á lengd og 0,5 mm á breidd, sem hreyfðist undir slímhúð augans. Báðar konurnar höfðu einnig einkenni frá útlimum: endurteknar lotubundnar bólgur og kláða, og vöðvaverki. Greiningin var í báðum tilfellum lóasýki með Calabar-bólgum á útlimum og meðferð með albendazóli og díetýlcarbamazíni leiddi til lækningar. Aukinnar árvekni er þörf gagnvart sýkingum sem hafa verið sjaldgæfar í okkar heimshluta hingað til.
  • Vísindastörf íslenskra lækna - framþróun fræðanna

    Þórður Harðarson; Guðmundur Þorgeirsson; Fyrrum prófessorar í lyflæknisfræði við Háskóla Íslands og Landspítala (Læknafélag Íslands, 2018-07)
  • Cardiac and skeletal muscle effects of electrical weapons : A review of human and animal studies.

    Kunz, Sebastian N; Calkins, Hugh; Adamec, Jiri; Kroll, Mark W; [ 1 ] Landspitali Univ Hosp, Dept Forens Pathol, V Baronstig 101, Reykjavik, Iceland Show more [ 2 ] Univ Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland Show more [ 3 ] Johns Hopkins Med Inst, Baltimore, MD 21205 USA Show more [ 4 ] Ludwig Maximilians Univ Munchen, Inst Forens Med, Munich, Germany Show more [ 5 ] Univ Minnesota, Dept Biomed Engn, Minneapolis, MN USA Show more [ 6 ] Calif Polytech Inst, San Luis Obispo, CA USA (Humana Press, 2018-09-01)
    Conducted Electrical Weapons (CEWs) are being used as the preferred non-lethal force option for police and special forces worldwide. This new technology challenges an exposed opponent similarly to the way they would be challenged by physical exercise combined with emotional stress. While adrenergic and metabolic effects have been meta-analyzed and reviewed, there has been no systematic review of the effects of CEWs on skeletal and cardiac muscle. A systematic and careful search of the MedLine database was performed to find publications describing pathophysiological cardiac and skeletal muscle effects of CEWs. For skeletal muscle effects, we analyzed all publications providing changes in creatine kinase, myoglobin and potassium. For cardiac effects, we analyzed reported troponin changes and arrhythmias related to short dart-to-heart-distances. Conducted electrical weapons satisfy all relevant electrical safety standards and there are, to date, no proven electrocution incidents caused by CEWs. A potential cardiovascular risk has been recognized by some of the experimental animal data. The effects on the heart appear to be limited to instances when there is a short dart-to-heart-distance. The effect on the skeletal muscle system appears to be negligible. A responsible use of a CEW on a healthy adult, within the guidelines proposed by the manufacturer, does not imply a significant health risk for that healthy adult.
  • Corrigendum to "Quantitative UPLC-MS/MS assay of urinary 2,8-dihydroxyadenine for diagnosis and management of adenine phosphoribosyltransferase deficiency" [J. Chromatogr. B 1036-1037 (2016) 170-177].

    Thorsteinsdottir, Margret; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur A; Eiriksson, Finnur F; Runolfsdottir, Hrafnhildur L; Agustsdottir, Inger M Sch; Oddsdottir, Steinunn; Sigurdsson, Baldur B; Hardarson, Hordur K; Kamble, Nilesh R; Sigurdsson, Snorri Th; Edvardsson, Vidar O; Palsson, Runolfur; [ 1 ] Univ Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland [ 2 ] ArcticMass, Reykjavik, Iceland [ 3 ] Landspitali Natl Univ Hosp Iceland, Childrens Med Ctr, Reykjavik, Iceland [ 4 ] Landspitali Natl Univ Hosp Iceland, Dept Clin Biochem, Reykjavik, Iceland Show more [ 5 ] European Acad Bolzano Bozen, Ctr Biomed, Bolzano, Italy [ 6 ] Landspitali Natl Univ Hosp Iceland, Div Nephrol, Reykjavik, Iceland (Elsevier Science, 2018-08-15)
  • Inflammatory Breast Cancer: What surgeons need to know.

    Rafnsdóttir, Svanheiður Lóa; Audisio, Riccardo A; 1 Oncoplastic Breast Surgery, Department of Surgery, Landspitali University Hospital, 13-A Hringbraut, IS-101, Reykjavik, Iceland; Department of Surgery, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Blå Stråket 5, 413 45, Göteborg, Sweden. Electronic address: svanhra@landspitali.is. 2 Department of Surgery, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Blå Stråket 5, 413 45, Göteborg, Sweden. Electronic address: raudisio@doctors.org.uk. (Elsevier, 2018-01-01)
    Strict criteria to identify Inflammatory Breast Cancer (IBC) have been made available - these are based on pathological as well as clinical observations. It is mandatory to confirm the criteria used in any further report. Scientific evidence accumulated so far is confusing, and unclear therefore no hard conclusion can be drawn from the available literature on the management of IBC. The advent of new medications results into an up-to-date management and different outcomes. It is mandatory to follow these criteria if reliable guidelines are to be made available in the next future.
  • A Case of Complete Scotoma Following Intake of Conjugated Linoleic Acid Supplement

    Eliasson, Jon H.; Birgisdottir, Bryndis E.; Gudmundsson, Larus S.; 1 ] Centralsjukhuset, Dept Neurol, Kristianstad, Sweden Show more [ 2 ] Univ Iceland, Fac Food Sci & Nutr, Unit Nutr Res, Reykjavik, Iceland Show more [ 3 ] Landspitali Univ Hosp, Reykjavik, Iceland Show more [ 4 ] Univ Iceland, Fac Pharmaceut Sci, Hagi Hofsvallagata 53, IS-107 Reykjavik, Iceland; Department of Neurology; Centralsjukhuset; Kristianstad Sweden; Unit for Nutrition Research; Faculty of Food Science and Nutrition University of Iceland and Landspitali University Hospital; Reykjavik Iceland; Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences; University of Iceland; Reykjavik Iceland (Wiley, 2018-05)
  • Geðveikin, Batasetrið og ég

    Jóna Heiðdís Guðmundsdóttir; Batasetur Suðurlands (Iðjuþjálfafélag Íslands, 2017)
  • Ævintýrameðferð á Æfingastöðinni

    Jónína Aðalsteinsdóttir; Sæunn Pétursdóttir; Æfingastöðinni (Iðjuþjálfafélag Íslands, 2017)
  • Umbótastarf iðjuþjálfa á bráðadeildum LSH

    Elísabet Unnsteinsdóttir; Guðríður Erna Guðmundsdóttir; Bráðadeildum Landspítala (Iðjuþjálfafélag Íslands, 2017)
  • Gagnsemi ADL þjálfunar fyrir heilablóðfallssjúklinga

    Guðrún Árnadóttir; Landspítala og Háskóla Íslands (Iðjuþjálfafélag Íslands, 2017)
  • Gagnsemi iðjuþjálfunar: undirbúningsgögn fyrir úttektir iðjuþjálfa LSH

    Guðrún Árnadóttir; Landspítala og Háskóla Íslands (Iðjuþjálfafélag Íslands, 2017)
  • Notkun þjónustuyfirlits við iðjuþjálfun einstaklinga með mænuskaða

    Sigþrúður Loftsdóttir; Grensásdeild Landspítala (Iðjuþjálfafélag Íslands, 2016)
  • Þjónustuyfirlit og klínísk vinna iðjuþjálfa

    Guðrún Árnadóttir; Lillý H Sverrisdóttir; Landspítala (Iðjuþjálfafélag Íslands, 2016)
  • Iðjuþjálfun Landspítala: Eðli og eiginleikar matstækja í notkun

    Guðrún Árnadóttir; Landspítala (Iðjuþjálfafélag Íslands, 2016)

View more