• Evaluation of ICU practice in Scandinavia [editorial]

      Wernerman, J; Stefánsson, T (Blackwell Munksgaard, 2003-11-01)
      Intensive care medicine is a relatively young discipline, which in the Scandinavian countries is within the Anaesthesia speciality. Throughout the world the organization of intensive care medicine is very variable. Intensive care units (ICUs) may serve only one medical discipline or they may, as is most common in the Scandinavian countries, be multidisciplinary. The speciality of the doctors in charge of ICUs, the intensivists, also varies. In the Scandinavian countries an anaesthesiologist, profiled towards intensive care medicine is most common, but in other countries pulmonologists, surgeons, paediatricians, gastroenterologists etc, may also become intensivists. This
    • Scientific contributions and citations [editorial]

      Stefansson, Einar (Munksgaard, 2005-06-01)
      The academic and economic strength of Acta is based on the quality of Nordic ophthalmology. Acta has modernized in recent years, introducing computer technology and Internet use into manuscript submission and processing, as well as electronic publishing and access. The academic quality of the journal is ever increasing, as is its international exposure. The readership of Acta consists of practically all ophthalmologists in the Nordic countries and subscribers and libraries all over the world. Online usage of Acta has been increasing rapidly, with more than 100 000 articles downloaded in 2004 (Fig. 1). Online access to Acta is utilized by ophthalmologists and eye health care researchers all over the world: in 2004, for example, more than 2400 articles were downloaded in Australia and 2200 in South Korea.
    • Solving the enigma of exfoliation glaucoma: a breakthrough in glaucoma research [editorial]

      Jonasson, Fridbert (Munksgaard, 2007-12-01)
      Exfoliation syndrome (XFS) is an age-related disorder common in many populations although there are also considerable ethnic and geographical differences (Ringvold 1999). XFS is characterized by the accumulation of abnormal microfibrillar deposits that line the aqueous bathed surfaces of the anterior segment of the eye; this may lead to elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) and exfoliation glaucoma (XFG), the latter being characterized by rapid progression, high resistance to medical therapy and worse prognosis than primary open-angle glaucoma (Schlotzer-Schrehardt & Naumann 2006). This condition was first reported by the Finnish ophthalmologist Lindberg in his doctoral theses in 1917, some 90 years ago. An English version was published in this journal in 1989 (Lindberg 1989). A recent study found 15-year risk of XFS conversion to XFG to be about 60% (Jeng et al. 2007).