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dc.contributor.authorHelgason, Tomas
dc.date.accessioned2010-10-06T14:40:43Z
dc.date.available2010-10-06T14:40:43Z
dc.date.issued1996-01
dc.date.submitted2010-10-06
dc.identifier.citationNord J Psychiatry. 1996, 50(s36):31-8en
dc.identifier.issn0803-9488
dc.identifier.issn1502-4725
dc.identifier.doi10.3109/08039489609104312
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/112606
dc.descriptionTo access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links fielden
dc.description.abstractEpidemiological psychiatric research in Iceland illustrating the uses of epidemiology is reviewed briefly. The incidence and disease expectancy have not changed during the twentieth century except for alcoholism, which has increased during the latter half of the century. The prevalence of mental disorders in the population aged 5-59 years is about 20% but increases after the age of 70 due to organic mental disorders. The incidence rate for psychiatric consultations has been slightly less than 1% per year. Disease expectancy until the age of 61 years has been estimated to be 34%, and until the age of 87 years 85%. The prevalence of inpatients in psychiatric wards decreased from 1.87 per 1000 inhabitants in 1953 to 0.6 in 1989, while the number of admissions, day patients, and outpatient visits increased markedly. Approximately 19,400 psychiatric outpatient visits per 100,000 inhabitants were registered in 1992 in outpatient clinics and in private practice. The number of inpatient beds for short-term treatment of alcoholics increased sixfold during 1975-85, and first admission rates for alcoholism increased by 200%; at the same time the average alcohol consumption increased very little. During 1 month in 1984 the prescriptions for psychotropic medications in Reykjavik amounted to 92.7 DDD per 1000 adult men and 146.7 for women. This decreased slightly in 1989 due to a decrease in the use of tranquillizers and hypnotics, which was partly balanced by an increase in prescriptions for antidepressants. Psychiatrists issued only 17% of the prescriptions. Studies relating to course, disability and mortality are mentioned briefly, as is identification of risk groups.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor & Francisen
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.3109/08039489609104312en
dc.subject.meshIcelanden
dc.subject.meshMental Disordersen
dc.subject.meshEpidemiologic Studiesen
dc.subject.meshAlcoholismen
dc.subject.meshPsychotherapyen
dc.titleEpidemiology of psychiatric disorders in Icelanden
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalNordic Journal of Psychiatryen
html.description.abstractEpidemiological psychiatric research in Iceland illustrating the uses of epidemiology is reviewed briefly. The incidence and disease expectancy have not changed during the twentieth century except for alcoholism, which has increased during the latter half of the century. The prevalence of mental disorders in the population aged 5-59 years is about 20% but increases after the age of 70 due to organic mental disorders. The incidence rate for psychiatric consultations has been slightly less than 1% per year. Disease expectancy until the age of 61 years has been estimated to be 34%, and until the age of 87 years 85%. The prevalence of inpatients in psychiatric wards decreased from 1.87 per 1000 inhabitants in 1953 to 0.6 in 1989, while the number of admissions, day patients, and outpatient visits increased markedly. Approximately 19,400 psychiatric outpatient visits per 100,000 inhabitants were registered in 1992 in outpatient clinics and in private practice. The number of inpatient beds for short-term treatment of alcoholics increased sixfold during 1975-85, and first admission rates for alcoholism increased by 200%; at the same time the average alcohol consumption increased very little. During 1 month in 1984 the prescriptions for psychotropic medications in Reykjavik amounted to 92.7 DDD per 1000 adult men and 146.7 for women. This decreased slightly in 1989 due to a decrease in the use of tranquillizers and hypnotics, which was partly balanced by an increase in prescriptions for antidepressants. Psychiatrists issued only 17% of the prescriptions. Studies relating to course, disability and mortality are mentioned briefly, as is identification of risk groups.


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