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dc.contributor.authorQiu, Chengxuan
dc.contributor.authorCotch, Mary Frances
dc.contributor.authorSigurdsson, Sigurdur
dc.contributor.authorGarcia, Melissa
dc.contributor.authorKlein, Ronald
dc.contributor.authorJonasson, Fridbert
dc.contributor.authorKlein, Barbara E K
dc.contributor.authorEiriksdottir, Gudny
dc.contributor.authorHarris, Tamara B
dc.contributor.authorvan Buchem, Mark A
dc.contributor.authorGudnason, Vilmundur
dc.contributor.authorLauner, Lenore J
dc.date.accessioned2010-10-27T09:31:09Z
dc.date.available2010-10-27T09:31:09Z
dc.date.issued2008-06
dc.date.submitted2010-10-22
dc.identifier.citationDiabetes. 2008, 57(6):1645-50en
dc.identifier.issn1939-327X
dc.identifier.pmid18332097
dc.identifier.doi10.2337/db07-1455
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/113872
dc.descriptionTo access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links fielden
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: Diabetes increases the risk for microvascular disease. The retina and the brain both have intricate microvascular systems that are developmentally similar. We sought to examine whether microvascular lesions in the retina and in the brain are associated and whether this association differs among people with and without diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: The analysis included 4,218 participants of the Icelandic population-based Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility-Reykjavik Study who were born in 1907-1935 and who were previously followed as a part of the Reykjavik Study. Retinal focal arteriolar narrowing, arteriovenous (AV) nicking, and microaneurysms/hemorrhages were evaluated on digital retinal images of both eyes. Cerebral microbleeds (CMBs) were evaluated from magnetic resonance images. Data were analyzed with logistic and multinomial logistic regression models controlling for demographics, major cardiovascular risk factors, cerebral infarcts, and white matter lesions. RESULTS: Evidence of brain microbleeds was found in 485 (11.5%) people, including 192 with multiple (>or=2) microbleeds. Subjects with signs of retinal microvascular lesions were at a significantly increased likelihood for having multiple CMBs. People with diabetes in combination with the presence of either retinal AV nicking (odds ratio [OR] 2.47 [95% CI 1.42-4.31]) or retinal microaneurysms/hemorrhages (2.28 [1.24-4.18]) were significantly more likely to have multiple CMBs. CONCLUSIONS: Retinal microvascular abnormalities and brain microbleeds may occur together in older adults. People with both diabetes and signs of retinal microvascular lesions (AV nicking and microaneurysms/hemorrhages) are more likely to have multiple microbleeds in the brain. Microvascular disease in diabetes extends to the brain.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherAmerican Diabetes Associationen
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.2337/db07-1455en
dc.subject.meshAgeden
dc.subject.meshAged, 80 and overen
dc.subject.meshArteriolesen
dc.subject.meshCerebral Hemorrhageen
dc.subject.meshCerebrovascular Circulationen
dc.subject.meshDiabetes Mellitusen
dc.subject.meshEnvironmenten
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshGenetic Predisposition to Diseaseen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshIcelanden
dc.subject.meshMagnetic Resonance Imagingen
dc.subject.meshMaleen
dc.subject.meshMicrocirculationen
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden
dc.subject.meshRetinaen
dc.subject.meshRetinal Vesselsen
dc.subject.meshVenulesen
dc.titleRetinal and cerebral microvascular signs and diabetes: the age, gene/environment susceptibility-Reykjavik studyen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentLaboratory of Epidemiology, Demography, and Biometry, National Institute on Aging, National Institutes of Health (NIH), Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA.en
dc.identifier.journalDiabetesen
html.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: Diabetes increases the risk for microvascular disease. The retina and the brain both have intricate microvascular systems that are developmentally similar. We sought to examine whether microvascular lesions in the retina and in the brain are associated and whether this association differs among people with and without diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: The analysis included 4,218 participants of the Icelandic population-based Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility-Reykjavik Study who were born in 1907-1935 and who were previously followed as a part of the Reykjavik Study. Retinal focal arteriolar narrowing, arteriovenous (AV) nicking, and microaneurysms/hemorrhages were evaluated on digital retinal images of both eyes. Cerebral microbleeds (CMBs) were evaluated from magnetic resonance images. Data were analyzed with logistic and multinomial logistic regression models controlling for demographics, major cardiovascular risk factors, cerebral infarcts, and white matter lesions. RESULTS: Evidence of brain microbleeds was found in 485 (11.5%) people, including 192 with multiple (>or=2) microbleeds. Subjects with signs of retinal microvascular lesions were at a significantly increased likelihood for having multiple CMBs. People with diabetes in combination with the presence of either retinal AV nicking (odds ratio [OR] 2.47 [95% CI 1.42-4.31]) or retinal microaneurysms/hemorrhages (2.28 [1.24-4.18]) were significantly more likely to have multiple CMBs. CONCLUSIONS: Retinal microvascular abnormalities and brain microbleeds may occur together in older adults. People with both diabetes and signs of retinal microvascular lesions (AV nicking and microaneurysms/hemorrhages) are more likely to have multiple microbleeds in the brain. Microvascular disease in diabetes extends to the brain.


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