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dc.contributor.authorGottfredsdottir, M S
dc.contributor.authorSverrisson, T
dc.contributor.authorMusch, D C
dc.contributor.authorStefansson, E
dc.date.accessioned2010-11-02T14:46:36Z
dc.date.available2010-11-02T14:46:36Z
dc.date.issued1999-04
dc.date.submitted2010-11-02
dc.identifier.citationJ. Glaucoma. 1999, 8(2):134-9en
dc.identifier.issn1057-0829
dc.identifier.pmid10209731
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2336/114374
dc.descriptionTo access publisher full text version of this article. Please click on the hyperlink in Additional Links fielden
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: To determine the concordance of glaucoma and ocular parameters in monozygotic twins and their spouses. METHODS: This was a prospective study that included 50 twin pairs 55 years of age or older and 47 of their spouses. Zygosity was determined by genetic laboratory testing. RESULTS: The concordance of open-angle glaucoma in monozygotic twin pairs was 98.0%, which significantly exceeded that of twin/spouse pairs (70.2%). There was a significant association in mean intraocular pressure (IOP), mean axial length, anterior chamber depth, and refractive error in the twin pairs. However, there was no association between the twins and their spouses for these ocular parameters. Eight twin pairs were found to have pseudoexfoliation syndrome (PXFS), five of which were concordant. There was no association between glaucoma and mean axial length or glaucoma and refractive error in the twin pairs studied. CONCLUSION: The statistically significant higher concordance of glaucoma--and the high correlation of mean IOP, mean axial length, anterior chamber depth, and refractive error--in twin pairs and the lack of association of these factors in twin/spouse pairs strongly suggests the importance of genetic factors for these ocular parameters.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherRaven Pressen
dc.relation.urlhttp://ovidsp.ovid.com/ovidweb.cgi?T=JS&CSC=Y&NEWS=N&PAGE=fulltext&D=ovftc&AN=00061198-199904000-00009en
dc.subject.meshAgeden
dc.subject.meshAged, 80 and overen
dc.subject.meshAnterior Chamberen
dc.subject.meshChronic Diseaseen
dc.subject.meshDiseases in Twinsen
dc.subject.meshExfoliation Syndromeen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshGlaucoma, Open-Angleen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshIcelanden
dc.subject.meshInfectious Disease Transmission, Verticalen
dc.subject.meshIntraocular Pressureen
dc.subject.meshMaleen
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden
dc.subject.meshOptic Disken
dc.subject.meshProspective Studiesen
dc.subject.meshRefractive Errorsen
dc.subject.meshTwins, Monozygoticen
dc.subject.meshVisual Acuityen
dc.titleChronic open-angle glaucoma and associated ophthalmic findings in monozygotic twins and their spouses in Icelanden
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Ophthalmology, University of Michigan School of Medicine, W. K. Kellogg Eye Center, Ann Arbor, USA.en
dc.identifier.journalJournal of glaucomaen
html.description.abstractPURPOSE: To determine the concordance of glaucoma and ocular parameters in monozygotic twins and their spouses. METHODS: This was a prospective study that included 50 twin pairs 55 years of age or older and 47 of their spouses. Zygosity was determined by genetic laboratory testing. RESULTS: The concordance of open-angle glaucoma in monozygotic twin pairs was 98.0%, which significantly exceeded that of twin/spouse pairs (70.2%). There was a significant association in mean intraocular pressure (IOP), mean axial length, anterior chamber depth, and refractive error in the twin pairs. However, there was no association between the twins and their spouses for these ocular parameters. Eight twin pairs were found to have pseudoexfoliation syndrome (PXFS), five of which were concordant. There was no association between glaucoma and mean axial length or glaucoma and refractive error in the twin pairs studied. CONCLUSION: The statistically significant higher concordance of glaucoma--and the high correlation of mean IOP, mean axial length, anterior chamber depth, and refractive error--in twin pairs and the lack of association of these factors in twin/spouse pairs strongly suggests the importance of genetic factors for these ocular parameters.


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